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georgev
11-29-2006, 12:12 PM
Hi!
I recommend this study to all who are interested in Middle East policy.
Respectfully,
George

http://www.ctc.usma.edu/aar/CTC-JAAR-Syria.pdf

Tom Odom
11-29-2006, 02:26 PM
George,

Thanks for posting that link. I visited Hama in 1988 while on UN duty and my guide (a "retired" Syrian policeman) would not allow us to go into the part of the city that had been leveled. He was extremely reticent in discussing what had happened.

Best

Tom

Rob Thornton
11-30-2006, 02:39 PM
I've seen allot of the same thoughts (and specific language) put forward in AIF propaganda coming into Mosul- after reading this, I understand more about where they are coming from. I'll pass it along.
Thanks, Rob

georgev
12-01-2006, 03:51 PM
I've seen allot of the same thoughts (and specific language) put forward in AIF propaganda coming into Mosul- after reading this, I understand more about where they are coming from. I'll pass it along.
Thanks, Rob


Hi!
What do you mean specific language? Be more precise and explain the significance of your very good english. I just wanted to share the the information to my friends. I was there, too.

Respectfully,
George

Jedburgh
07-20-2007, 01:54 PM
CSIS, 16 Jul 07: Improving US and Syrian Relations: Some Possible Beginnings (http://www.csis.org/media/csis/pubs/071907_syrian-us_relations.pdf)

I recently traveled to Syria with two of my colleagues at CSIS, Jon Alterman and Thomas Sanderson. We did so at the invitation of the Orient Center in Damascus to discuss US and Syrian relations and met with a range of Syrians concerned with the distance and tensions between our countries. We also met with President Asad and the Foreign Minister Walid al-Moallem....

...the Syrian perspective was that the Bush Administration had no serious interest in talking to Syria, and that any progress would have to come after it left office. I will not attempt to speak for my colleagues, but my perspective was that we faced serious problems in our relations over Syria’s polices towards Lebanon, Hezbollah, and Iran.

At the same time, I was again struck by the fact that Syria remains one of the more secular and modern societies in the Middle East. Its people are often well educated, almost always friendly, and are not anti-American in the broad sense of the term. The people we spoke to showed considerable pragmatism and flexibility in their views, and Syrians are an easy people to talk with. Unlike some of the region’s ideologues, it is possible to have a real dialogue....

kaur
07-30-2007, 06:21 AM
The Syrian regime no longer feels weak and as its prospects of survival improve, its self-confidence is increasingly apparent.
The tactics of Syria's opponents have mostly been counterproductive, giving the Syrian regime increased leverage. Attempted isolation has not weakened the regime and external pressure has strengthened its domestic position.
Meanwhile, its regional position has been bolstered by policy failures in Iraq and Lebanon.
The Syrian leadership is now betting on certain favourable developments which will continue to boost its confidence, both in the region and vis--vis Western policy.
It is futile to conduct policy towards Syria on the basis of antipathy towards the regime. Syria's national interests must be recognized for there to be progress.
Syria will not 'capitulate' to US demands merely to become another 'moderate ally'. The Syrian regime is not looking for popularity, but for recognition. It seeks a business deal rather than a love affair.

http://www.chathamhouse.org.uk/publications/papers/view/-/id/513/