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Old 11-30-2012   #304
ganulv
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Location: Berkshire County, Mass.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuchs View Post
I'm still confused there's such a thing as a Snowshoe magazine.
There is a magazine of everything on the Internet. Also, Rule 34.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuchs View Post
Still, after having a glance at the article I cannot but wonder if the Russian wicker overshoes of days gone by wouldn't qualify as snowshoes as well, being meant for harsh winter (inevitably deep snow) and increasing the footprint a lot.
There is also the waraji in Japan which is sometimes used in the winter by climbers (well, trekkers, at least). Snowshoes in the North American sense typically combine traction and flotation. The lapti and waraji are essentially traction devices when used in ice and snow. As far as I know, prior to the Atlantic exchange Europeans had skis only for flotation and the native peoples of North America had snowshoes only for the same (I do not know about Japan). The going theory relates this to differences in groundcover. The forested areas of North America were not welcoming to skis, though the longer types of snowshoes glissade pretty well.

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