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Thread: Call for Professional Reading Lists

  1. #61
    Council Member William F. Owen's Avatar
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    Principles of War for the Information Age
    I consider this one essential for really understanding the enduring and unchanging nature of war.

    For CvC I consider this about the best analysis I have read so far.

    Another Bloody Century by Colin Gray is an excellent antidote to the US "new war" fad, and War, Peace, and International Relations: An Introduction to Strategic History is an excellent primer to understanding what strategy actually is.

    Strategy for Chaos is also very good.
    Infinity Journal "I don't care if this works in practice. I want to see it work in theory!"

    - The job of the British Army out here is to kill or capture Communist Terrorists in Malaya.
    - If we can double the ratio of kills per contact, we will soon put an end to the shooting in Malaya.
    Sir Gerald Templer, foreword to the "Conduct of Anti-Terrorist Operations in Malaya," 1958 Edition

  2. #62
    Council Member sabers8th's Avatar
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    Dave,
    Hello. Scott Shaw and myself wrote an article soon to be published in Infantry magazine inregards to a Platoon Leader Six pack of books: Here is the excerpt of the article:


    The PL Six-Pack
    We selected books that appealed to us and others on both personal and professional levels. These books are constantly revisited on the website, commented on, and discussed. They are perennial favorites of ours and many others. They are combat focused. They are listed in no certain order.

    The Killing Zone: My Life in the Vietnam War – Frederick Downs (ISBN-10: 0393310892)
    The Killing Zone is the story of a platoon leader in Company D, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry as part of 3rd Bde, 4th Infantry Division during 1967. Downs goes through a growing period from green lieutenant to seasoned platoon leader. This book enables you to put lieutenants into a situation that they are comfortable with – a tactical situation not unlike something that they did in ROTC or at West Point. It presents ethical, moral, and tactical challenges such as asking what they might do in certain situations. Several company commanders have used it as a primer for deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Stalking the Vietcong: Inside Operation Phoenix: A Personal Account – Stuart Herrington (ISBN-10: 0345472519)
    This book is a look inside both the intelligence world and the world of tactical advising. It shows how one man was able to break into the Vietcong at the local level. Herrington’s description of the “usual methods” and then his later use of cultural knowledge, language, and charm are brilliant and something that a platoon leader on the streets could emulate. This book shows why the step “Understand” was added to the battle command process.

    The Defense of Jisr al-Doreaa: With E. D. Swinton's "The Defence of Duffer's Drift" - Michael L. Burgoyne, Albert J. Marckwardt (ISBN-10: 0226080935)
    This book, by two amazing captains of cavalry, presents a modern day look at countering insurgency. It is “The Defense of Duffer’s Drift” using Iraq as a backdrop and includes that book as well – one of our favorite books. This short read takes LT Phil Connors (of Groundhog Day fame) from the receipt of his first mission – control the town of Jisr al-Doreaa – and follows his actions through the six times that it takes to get it right. The book by itself is an excellent discussion primer, and the accompanying website (http://www.defenseofjad.com) includes the dreams in a series of vignettes that leaders can use, free of charge, before or after reading what LT Connors did. It can be an, “I can do better” or a “Here’s what this guy did” for your officers.

    Platoon Leader: A Memoir of Command in Combat – James McDonough (ISBN-10: 0891418008)
    Platoon Leader, the story of 2LT James McDonough and his platoon in the 173rd Airborne Brigade in Vietnam, is the narrative of a platoon leader assuming command in combat. It is an intimate look at complacency in units and the aftermath of that complacency. McDonough’s book is open and honest to the point of him freely admitting the mistakes he made that would be natural to any platoon leader.

    Band of Brothers: E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne from Normandy to Hitler's Eagle's Nest – Stephen Ambrose (ISBN-10: 074322454X)

    This book is a classic study of one unit from its inception to end and illustrates how much leadership matters. Band of Brothers (and the corresponding HBO series) follows one American airborne infantry company from its formation at the beginning of World War II to its deactivation at the end of the war while the books Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters, by Dick Winters and Cole C. Kingseed ISBN-10: 0425213757, and others written by Don Malarkey, Buck Compton, David Keynon Webster, and Bill Guarnere serve as material to understand other viewpoints on how Soldiers view their leaders at all levels within a company.

    On Combat: The Psychology and Physiology of Deadly Conflict in War and Peace– Dave Grossman, Loren W. Christensen (ISBN-10: 0964920514)

    On Combat is an “examination of what it takes to perform, cope and survive in the toxicity of deadly combat.” This book offers a look at PTSD from how to survive and cope with its symptoms to helping others who may be suffering. As a book, it is particularly valuable to understanding what is happening to both the leader and those being led in combat.

    An Added Bonus Shot - Once an Eagle Anton Meyer (ISBN-10 0060084359)

    Hailed as the book that re-defined our values as an Army after Vietnam, Once an Eagle is the story of Sam Damon from his enlistment in the Army prior to the Punitive Expedition into Mexico through two World Wars, Korea, and Vietnam. This book provides a look at the hard ethical choices that our leaders must make in and out of combat and is a good primer for discussion within a company. It’s a little long, but the read is worth it.

    Hope this helps out.

    VR

    Kelly Jones and Scott Shaw

  3. #63
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    Moderator adds this link no longer works.

    Land Warfare Studies Centre, September 2009:

    The Australian Army Counterinsurgency and Small Wars Reading Guide

    Insurgency is a form of warfare as old as warfare itself, and it has gone by many names in the past: guerrilla warfare, partisan warfare, revolutionary warfare, insurrectionary warfare, irregular warfare, unconventional warfare, peoples' war and terrorism. All have been—and are—used to describe the same broad phenomenon, though they do not all have the exact same meaning and have not necessarily been used simultaneously. Modern insurgency, closely identified in the second half of the twentieth century with national liberation struggles and revolutionary Marxism derived from the writings—and practice—of Mao (among others), has a well defined theoretical literature. So, too, does counterinsurgency. There is, likewise, a sizeable historical literature that provides numerous case studies in the field. To borrow an observation of T E Lawrence, himself an insurgent leader: ‘With 2000 years of examples behind us, we have no excuse when fighting for not fighting well'.

    This reading list is intended to counter such tempting delusions, or at least to subject them to rigorous scrutiny. It makes no attempt, and no claim, to be exhaustive or definitive: such a list would run to many thousands of entries and quickly prove self-defeating. The list is divided into two parts: a strongly historical section, and a contemporary one. Arguments about insurgency in the present are frequently couched in historical terms, or by appeal to historical precedent. The quality of the argument is often determined by the quality of the history and depth of historical understanding conscripted to support it.
    Last edited by davidbfpo; 04-12-2014 at 01:54 PM. Reason: Add note

  4. #64

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    Lot of great books on these lists, but there's been a few I've found especially informative and enjoyable that I haven't seen so far:

    Inside CIAs Private World: Declassified Articles from the Agency's Internal Journal 1955-1992 , selected and edited by H. Bradford Westerfield.

    There's a lot of good material about the CIA out there, but you can't beat now-declassified articles by actual CIA agents and analysts (the agency has an internal journal, Studies in Intelligence weblink: https://www.cia.gov/library/center-f...ies/index.html , aimed at improving their methods). Besides being a fascinating glimpse into the methods of the organization, many of them are brilliant pieces by some of the finest minds the agency has to offer. The pieces examining methods of political analysis are invaluable for the improvement of one's mental toolbox, but the whole book was incredibly exciting to me. Heuer's piece on the Nosenko case was great too.

    Also I'd recommend, America Unrivaled: The Future of the Balance of Power, edited by G. John Ikenberry. It's a collection of highly readable and exhilarating essays by international relations theorists offering their explanation of the state of the world as of 2001, when it was published. Kenneth Waltz and Stephen Walt have my two favorite essays, but none of them are dull or unpersuasive. For anyone who wants to interpret foreign policy on the largest scale; that of grand strategy and the international system.

    Also great, but needing no explanation are:

    The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers, by Paul Kennedy.
    Perception and Misperception in International Politics, by Robert Jervis.

    I think someone already mentioned Command in War, by Martin van Creveld, but that's a risk I'm willing to take.
    Last edited by davidbfpo; 11-15-2009 at 11:46 AM. Reason: Add link to CIA Studies...

  5. #65
    Council Member Commando Spirit's Avatar
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    This is the UK Afghan Coin Centre's reading list:

    AFGHAN COIN CENTRE RECOMMENDED READING LIST

    Introduction

    1. There is now a wealth of literature focussing on Afghanistan and the Taliban, insurgencies and counterinsurgencies. This Recommended Reading List aims to highlight those that the Afghan COIN Centre considers to be the most useful for individuals with limited time preparing for deployment. As such, the books are listed in priority order in each thematic area.

    On Afghanistan



    Ahmed Rashid, Taleban: The Power of Militant Islam in Afghanistan and Beyond, London: I B Tauris & Co Ltd, 2010 and Descent into Chaos, London: Penguin, 2009. Rashid is one of the leading writers on the situation in South-West Asia. Well-connected in Afghanistan and Pakistan, his book Taleban, was the first really authoritative and readable account of its rise and subsequent removal from power. Descent into Chaos provides a provocative assessment of the region and the causes of and possible outcomes of instability.

    Antonio Giustozzi (ed), Decoding the New Taliban, London: C. Hurst & Co, 2009. Giustozzi builds on the success of his book The Laptop, Koran and the Kalashnikov to edit this timely book providing a detailed insight into the ‘New Taliban’ via a series of case studies across Afghanistan and Pakistan. Contributors include David Kilcullen, Thomas Ruttig and Giustozzi himself.

    Martin McCauley, Afghanistan and Central Asia: A Short History, London: Longman, 2002. McCauley draws on his vast knowledge of the region and its history to provide a clear and highly readable account of Afghanistan and the other Central Asian republics from their medieval pasts to the unpredictable present. He examines the rise of militant Islam and its impact on the region, the push and pull of global economics and politics, and possibilities for stability in an inherently unstable part of the world.

    Sarah Chayes, The Punishment of Virtue, Walking the Frontline of the War on Terror With a Woman Who Has Made it Her Home, London: Portabello Books Ltd, 2007. This excellent book provides a detailed insight into the Afghan mindset as well as that of the Taliban. Chayes examines the Afghan in an affectionate and understanding manner. It is an excellent source for troops deploying to work closely with the ANSF in a partnering capacity.

    On Insurgency and Counterinsurgency


    AFM Volume 1, Part 10, Countering Insurgency, January 2010. This is the core text and all personnel deploying on a COIN operation must be familiar with it and commanders even more so. It is the conceptual bedrock for the conduct of COIN operations.
    JDP 3-40, Security and Stabilisation: The Military Contribution, November 2009. This Joint Doctrine Publication sets the strategic context for the military contribution to Stability Operations which includes the COIN campaign in Afghanistan. Commanders and planning staff at Battle Group level and above must be familiar with its content.

    David Kilcullen, The Accidental Guerrilla: Fighting Small Wars in the Midst of a Big One, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Kilcullen argues a classical approach to COIN but sets it in a contemporary context. It is highly readable and Kilcullen makes full use of his operational experience to bring the hypothesis to life.

    John Mackinlay, The Insurgent Archipelago, London: Hurst & Company, 2009. Mackinlay’s careful analysis of the contemporary insurgent, and his thesis of post-Maoist, information age, religiously motivated insurgency is the most compelling British academic publication since Kitson. His arguments, particularly in the last third of the book, are provocative and presented in a lively, very readable style.

    Frank Kitson, Bunch of Five, London: Faber &Faber, 1977. Bunch of Five is the more readable, arguably more interesting sequel to the comprehensive but inevitably academic Low Intensity Operations (1972). Kitson explains, using his own extensive experience, why low-level, bottom-up intelligence is so crucial to successful COIN.

    Sir Robert Thompson, Defeating Communist Insurgency: The Lessons of Malaya and Vietnam, New York, NY: Frederick A. Praeger, 1966. Delete the word ‘communist’ from Thompson’s classic analysis, and his arguments are as relevant and applicable today as they were nearly fifty years ago: politics, law and legitimacy, planning, intelligence, strategic communications, and security operations to protect the population. His principles still have a profound effect on COIN theory.

    Thomas Rid and Thomas Keaney (eds), Understanding Counterinsurgency: Doctrine, Operations and Challenges, London: Routledge, 2010. Rid has collected essays by the leading writers in the field to examine how thinking about COIN has developed in the West, what COIN means to the armed services and indigenous forces, and the challenges COIN faces: governance, culture, ethics, information operations, civil-military integration and time.

    Daniel Marston and Carter Malkasian (eds), Counterinsurgency in Modern Warfare, Oxford: Osprey, April 2008. Marston and Malkasian present expertly written, succinct analyses of thirteen crucial counter-insurgency campaigns: Afghanistan today, Iraq, Ireland 1919-21, the US in the Philippines and Vietnam, the French in Algeria and Indo-China, the British totems of Malaya and Northern Ireland and its nadir in Aden, Rhodesia 1962-80, and the Israeli response to the Al-Aqsa Intifada.

    Tony Jeapes, SAS Secret War, London: William Kimber, 1980, republished HarperCollins, 2000. Although not as historically detailed as John Akehurst’s We Won A War, Jeapes describes the SAS operation to raise and train the Firqa. His insights into the cross-discipline approach to civil and military development, PSYOPS and the tribal dimension of the campaign are of direct relevance to operations in Afghanistan.

    The US Dimension

    US Department of the Army, Field Manual 3-24 – Counterinsurgency, Washington, DC: Headquarters Department of the Army, December 2006. Commanders deploying on COIN operations need to know what the manual which prompted such a widespread reform of COIN, and so influenced commanders in the US and British Armies, actually says, and how it differs from the UK AFM on COIN.

    Linda Robinson, Tell Me How This Ends: General David Petraeus and the Search for a Way Out of Iraq, New York, NY: Public Affairs, 2008. Robinson’s book details Gen Petraeus, the US Army’s COIN revolution, and the Surge in Iraq. It is a lively, accurate and very well-informed account which brings the turning point of the war in Iraq, and the practical challenges of ‘Securing the Population’ to life.

    Thomas Ricks, The Gamble: General Petraeus and the Untold Story of the American Surge In Iraq, 2006-2008, London: Allen Lane, 2009. The Gamble is a balanced counterpoint to his previous book Fiasco. He explains how the case for the Surge was developed in 2006 and, against all evidence and advice, was accepted and then implemented successfully in 2007. He focuses on the central role of Gen Petraeus and his leadership.

    Further Guidance

    16. Further reference material and guidance can be found at the Afghan COIN Centre Webpage on the Army Knowledge Exchange (AKX) at the link below or direct from the Afghan COIN Centre via the contact details on the AKX page.



    Afghan COIN Centre
    LWC, Warminster
    Commando Spirit:
    Courage, Determination, Unselfishness, and Cheerfulness in the face of adversity

  6. #66
    Council Member USMC-03's Avatar
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    Default Recommended Reading?

    Since my schedule keeps me busy from before dawn to well after dusk I don't read nearly as much as I'd like, but I'm planning making up for that at lease a little over the upcoming holidays. With that in mind I thought I'd ask for opinions from the members here on their recommended reading lists; mostly interested in the small wars theme but I'll be more than interested in any other topics as well. From perusing other threads I've already made note of quite a few books, but let's see what the collective wisdom comes up with…

  7. #67
    Council Member jcustis's Avatar
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    I read from your intro that you are learning to apply Sun Tzu and Liddell Hart to the business world, so you might be interested in Paul Howe's Training and Leadership for the Fight.

    Although he writes from the perspective of being a former member of Delta and now a tactical firearms trainer, he beats the drums nicely and I think his tone will resonate well for you.

    Also, anything Kilcullen makes for good reads.

    But if you don't have much time, I'd recommend reading the past issues of the Small Wars Journal. If you have not dipped a toe into the waters there, the articles tend to make for easy reading just before turning out the bedside table lamp.

  8. #68
    Council Member bourbon's Avatar
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    You are an MBA grad student? I suggest The 4-Hour Work Week by Timothy Ferriss, his philosophy is not for everyone but there is at least something in the book for everybody. His time management tips are worthwhile alone.

  9. #69
    Council Member Sergeant T's Avatar
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    Man, if I lived in Portland I'd be dropping some serious coin at Powell's.

    A few that have stood out to me in the last few years:

    The Long Tail by Chris Anderson
    Global Brain by Howard Bloom
    Terror at Beslan by John Giduck
    The Fourth Turning by Strauss & Howe
    The Medici Effect by Frans Johansson
    Predictably Irrational by Daniel Ariely
    The Science of Fear by Daniel Gardner
    Denialism by Michael Specter
    The Management Myth by Matthew Stewart
    The Big Short by Michael Lewis
    The Black Swan and Fooled by Randomness by Nassim Nicholas Taleb

    The math in The Black Swan gave me a headache, but you'll probably be right at home with it. If you're looking for some good non-fiction that's a bit off the above topics I'd highly recommend Tim Egan's The Worst Hard Time or The Big Burn. Egan's a great story teller.

  10. #70
    Council Member USMC-03's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bourbon View Post
    You are an MBA grad student? I suggest The 4-Hour Work Week by Timothy Ferriss, his philosophy is not for everyone but there is at least something in the book for everybody. His time management tips are worthwhile alone.
    Looked up Timothy Ferriss for my Kindle; thanks for the tip. I've been reading a lot of Peter Drucker and Warren Bennis over the past couple of years so it will be interesting to compare.

    Quote Originally Posted by jcustis View Post
    I read from your intro that you are learning to apply Sun Tzu and Liddell Hart to the business world, so you might be interested in Paul Howe's Training and Leadership for the Fight.

    ...Also, anything Kilcullen makes for good reads.
    I marked Howe's book also, looks interesting. I've had Kilcullen's The Accidental Guerrilla on my long list for a short while, I'll move it up.

    I've also been delving into Small Wars Journal articles little by little as I have a bit of free time; almost always learn something.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sergeant T View Post
    Man, if I lived in Portland I'd be dropping some serious coin at Powell's.
    Powell's; been there, done that…

    Going to take a little while to look all those you recommended Sergeant T; I'll get there though, thanks.

    I'll throw out a few of my own favorites for everyone's consideration:

    Thunder Over the Ochoco by Gale Ontko
    Chasing Villa by Maj. Frank Tompkins
    The First and the Last by Adolf Galland
    The Mystery of Capital by Hernando De Soto

    And for a bit of fiction:

    The Power of One by Bryce Courtenay

  11. #71
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
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    Default War Stories by junior officers

    USMC-03,

    I trust this old thread has been found:http://council.smallwarsjournal.com/...ead.php?t=8283
    davidbfpo

  12. #72
    Council Member Bob's World's Avatar
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    A couple days ago I pulled my dusty old copy of John Del Vecchio's "The 13th Valley" off the shelf, am reading it with a very different perspective than when I first read it 20+ years ago.

    There is really three layers to this story. There is the war story of small unit tactics vs the NVA in the Central Highlands in 1970. Great stuff. (and what I primarily remember from my first read). Then there is the personal dramas of deployed soldiers and their strained relationships with their significant others, with all of the complicating factors of distance, politics, and the barrier created by the changes a man goes through in that type of combat situation that are as significant as they are impossible to explain. Lastly, he uses the wise company commanders guided debates between the street smart platoon sergeant, the long-suffering, well educated Vietnamese scout, the angry black soldier with ties to the civil rights movement back home, and the studious Chicano RTO and the culturally shocked new guy to weave in a very sophisticated debate about the nature of insurgency, the problems of intervention, etc. It is that third story line that has me re-reading this book today. I highly recommend it to senior policy leaders.

    When I read "Street Without Joy" during the Q-Course in '90 I thought "How could we have made all of the huge mistakes we made in Vietnam when we had these tremendous lessons learned from the French experience to guide us?"

    As I read "The 13th Valley" I am having a Deja vu experience, thinking "How could we be making all of the huge mistakes we are making in the GWOT when we had these tremendous lessons learned from the U.S. experience in Vietnam to guide us?"

    I guess every guy figures he's smarter or better than the last guy and can overcome the inherent problems of such operations; even when the last guy was himself.

    (Fond memories of my days as a Deputy DA in Portland. I'd commute 12 miles in from Tualatin on my bike 2-4 days a week over Terwilliger. One wet, snowy day, with those icey winds blowing down the Columbia Gorge like they do, I mentioned in a down moment in court that it had made my bike ride in interesting that morning. The judge looked at me increduously and declared "you're a Jackass Mr. Jones" (meaning she believed such behavior to be suicidal). I took it as a complement. Plus burning all those calories allowed for guilt-free enjoyment of all the tremendous microbrews available there).
    Robert C. Jones
    Intellectus Supra Scientia
    (Understanding is more important than Knowledge)

    "The modern COIN mindset is when one arrogantly goes to some foreign land and attempts to make those who live there a lesser version of one's self. The FID mindset is when one humbly goes to some foreign land and seeks first to understand, and then to help in some small way for those who live there to be the best version of their own self." Colonel Robert C. Jones, US Army Special Forces (Retired)

  13. #73
    Council Member slapout9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob's World View Post
    The judge looked at me increduously and declared "you're a Jackass Mr. Jones" (meaning she believed such behavior to be suicidal).
    Don't you just hate it when the judge is right. Get a pick up Truck man!

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob's World View Post
    I guess every guy figures he's smarter or better than the last guy and can overcome the inherent problems of such operations; even when the last guy was himself.

    The judge looked at me increduously and declared "you're a Jackass Mr. Jones" (meaning she believed such behavior to be suicidal). I took it as a complement.
    Egos will be the ruin of us...

  15. #75
    Council Member Sergeant T's Avatar
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    Default Digression

    Plus burning all those calories allowed for guilt-free enjoyment of all the tremendous microbrews available there
    Widmer, Bridgeport, Deschutes, Tug Boat, VooDoo Donuts, etc., etc. That town is a serious challenge to those wanting to stay in shape.

  16. #76
    Moderator Steve Blair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob's World View Post
    A couple days ago I pulled my dusty old copy of John Del Vecchio's "The 13th Valley" off the shelf, am reading it with a very different perspective than when I first read it 20+ years ago.

    There is really three layers to this story. There is the war story of small unit tactics vs the NVA in the Central Highlands in 1970. Great stuff. (and what I primarily remember from my first read). Then there is the personal dramas of deployed soldiers and their strained relationships with their significant others, with all of the complicating factors of distance, politics, and the barrier created by the changes a man goes through in that type of combat situation that are as significant as they are impossible to explain. Lastly, he uses the wise company commanders guided debates between the street smart platoon sergeant, the long-suffering, well educated Vietnamese scout, the angry black soldier with ties to the civil rights movement back home, and the studious Chicano RTO and the culturally shocked new guy to weave in a very sophisticated debate about the nature of insurgency, the problems of intervention, etc. It is that third story line that has me re-reading this book today. I highly recommend it to senior policy leaders.
    I highly second any recommendation of "The 13th Valley." Del Vecchio's stuff is ALL multi-layered (including his look at Cambodia "For the Sake of all Living Things").
    "On the plains and mountains of the American West, the United States Army had once learned everything there was to learn about hit-and-run tactics and guerrilla warfare."
    T.R. Fehrenbach This Kind of War

  17. #77
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    Default US Army's Reading List Published

    US Army's Reading List Published

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    Default Another Reading List, And How We Do Love Them...

    Another Reading List, And How We Do Love Them...

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    Default The 2012 Warlord Loop Reading List

    The 2012 Warlord Loop Reading List

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  20. #80
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    Default UK's top soldier recommends

    Thanks to a "lurker" I have found the UK Chief of Defence Staff, Sir David Richards, has a created a list, broken down into: Context, Strategy, Warfare, Partners, People, Organisation, plus Links and is on:http://www.da.mod.uk/sites/da/recommended-reading

    His opening statement:
    I cannot predict the future. But I can predict that it will test our intellectual mettle. We will have to deal with uncertainty and ambiguity, to decide how best to achieve the necessary outcomes, and to persuade others of the need to act in a timely and effective fashion. We will have to do this in ways that reflect and advance our national interest and make best use of the resources that we are provided with.

    This will increasingly require a breadth and depth of contextual understanding, an ability to interpret the lessons of history, agile and creative thinking, and a dedicated professional approach to all that we do, be that on operations or in the office. This web page is designed to tempt readers into developing such attributes. It contains lists of books and articles that will provide intellectual stimulus for those who work in or with Defence, be they military or civilian.
    Sir David has now retired handing over to a General.

    Moderator's Note: There are a number of reading lists on SWC and some on SWBlog so I can see some merging one day! Some have now been merged, but there are a number on COIN, which should stay separate, but another day to consider merging
    Last edited by davidbfpo; 04-21-2013 at 10:14 PM.
    davidbfpo

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