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  1. #1
    燕山剑
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    Angry Wow riots in Bobai China against brutal 'one-child' blitz!

    Moderator's Note. In February 2013 three older, smaller threads on internal disorder were merged into this thread. A year later the Tienanmen Square attack and the Kunming train station attack thread were merged in.

    There is a separate thread in the Central Asia theme, for China's Far West provinces (inc. Tibet), with 131 posts and 79k views. It mainly covers the Uighur / ETIM violence and China's response
    :http://council.smallwarsjournal.com/...read.php?t=246


    "Many women have been forced to have abortions. Authorities are going into their homes and destroying their homes to implement the policy," said a woman in Bobai county.

    People here said, birth control bureaucrats showed up in a half-dozen towns with sledgehammers and threatened to knock holes in the homes of people who had failed to pay fines imposed for having more than one child. Other family planning officials, backed by hired toughs, pushed their way into businesses owned by parents of more than one child and confiscated everything from sacks of rice to color televisions, they said.

    Bobai was at the heart of riots that erupted late last week across Guangxi region and saw thousands of people take to the streets in anger against local authorities' efforts to enforce China's so-called "one-child policy".

    The CCP has devoted the nation’s resources to destroying China’s independant thinking,uproot all independent organisations. With better social security and pay ,who will have so many children?
    Last edited by davidbfpo; 01-03-2016 at 12:07 AM. Reason: Update Mod's Note

  2. #2
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    Red face A missish minister of China sentenced to death!

    Zheng Xiaoyu, former director of China's State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA), was sentenced to death by a Beijing court Tuesday morning.

    The bribes taken by Zheng, including cash and gifts, were worth more than 6.49 million yuan (about 850,000 U.S. dollars), according to the court. The bribes were given either directly or through his wife and son.

    The consequences of Zheng's dereliction of duty have proved extremely serious. Six types of medicine approved by the administration during that period were fake medicines. Some pharmaceutical companies used false documents to apply for approvals, the court said.

    How hapless! If he had flattered Jiang or Hu more,he would die?
    Last edited by SWCAdmin; 05-30-2007 at 11:10 AM. Reason: removed Chinese "version". We are an English language board.

  3. #3
    Council Member sullygoarmy's Avatar
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    If only we could get our politicians to worry about being executed for corruption. Hell, I'd be happy with just some jail time!
    "But the bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet withstanding, go out to meet it."

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  4. #4
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    Amen to that - I'd like to see the convicted crooks at least do some hard time instead of resting at some cushy, countryclub joint

  5. #5
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    Lightbulb China's elementary school teachers need better salaries!

    The headmasters are keen on cost. Elementary school teachers are paid as badly as unskilled workers! For example,one in Beijing gets a little more than 1000 yuan a month.They have to pluralize and can not concentrate on their pupils.

    The commie regime of China says that teachers are in the civil servant system.But it is not serious about this.In fact ,the bureaucrats only care about themselves and bribers.

    All professionals ,including teachers,engineers,accountants etc are all regarded as rebellious.Of course! Thinking people see right through the propaganda and know there is a better way.While GDP inflates and inflates,the Chinese Communist Party monopolize moer and more money, the professionals are falling into relative poverty.

    I thought pretty much everyone in China is paid badly.Whitout indepent trade uions,they can not earn better.
    Last edited by SWCAdmin; 06-07-2007 at 10:40 AM. Reason: Stop posting extra Chinese text without direct translation or at least an intro!

  6. #6
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
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    Default Beijing Wary Of Rising Tide Of Veterans' Discontent

    Bear with me : this article touched on the fairly large population of disgruntled Chinese veterans (core being the Sino-Viet '79 vets), their efforts at organizing public disobedience and the potentials of them becoming a political force (or loose-cannon, depending on your perspective).

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...ryId=128852968

    A consequence of China's military modernization program is that some veterans have been left behind, which has led them to protest their condition. Once the backbone of the communist revolution, soldiers are now considered among the groups that should be suppressed.

    China has embarked on an ambitious program to streamline its military, cutting manpower and improving technology. But some demobilized soldiers have fallen through the cracks and have taken to the streets to protest lack of jobs, health care and other benefits. It is a seldom-seen aspect of China's military modernization that has the Chinese government worried.
    A scrimmage in a Border Station
    A canter down some dark defile
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    I remember I was once on a train in China when a fellow came down the aisle on his knuckle calling out stuff. My translator told me he was a soldier who lost his legs somehow in service and he was asking for money to support him and his family. I got a brief chance to talk to the guy and it turns out they didn't even pay the guy out a pension, just turfed him out of the army.

    So really, no wonder old soldiers there are pissed off.

  8. #8
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
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    Default China's internal troubles (not the Far West)

    There is another separate thread on the domestic security situation in China's far west provinces, called 'China's Far West provinces: a Small War', which is in the Central Asia arena and on:http://council.smallwarsjournal.com/...read.php?t=246

    China's internal security has popped up once before in a thread, in 2007:http://council.smallwarsjournal.com/...ead.php?t=3019

    So I have created this new thread.
    Last edited by davidbfpo; 12-14-2011 at 11:01 PM.
    davidbfpo

  9. #9
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
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    Default China's internal troubles (not the Far West)

    Not just the Western reaches....

    BEIJING– For years, in the name of social harmony, China’s ruling Communist Party has been highly successful in masking, placating or simply distorting the tens of thousands of protests – dubbed “mass demonstrations” – that occur here ever year.
    The Wukan rebellion will prove a tougher dilemma for Beijing to solve.
    From The Telegraph newspaper’s Malcolm Moore comes details of the stunning story of Wukan, a fishing village of 20,000 in China’s southern Guangdong Province. Earlier this week, the entire town rose up and threw out local party officials and police forces following years of having the people’s land sold out from underneath them.
    http://behindthewall.msnbc.msn.com/

    For the first time on record, the Chinese Communist party has lost all control, with the population of 20,000 in this southern fishing village now in open revolt.
    The last of Wukan’s dozen party officials fled on Monday after thousands of people blocked armed police from retaking the village, standing firm against tear gas and water cannons.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl...ught-back.html
    A scrimmage in a Border Station
    A canter down some dark defile
    Two thousand pounds of education
    Drops to a ten-rupee jezail


    http://i.imgur.com/IPT1uLH.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dayuhan View Post
    Probably exaggerated, still of interest... the list could be a whole lot longer:

    http://www.foreignpolicy.com/article...mic_apocalypse
    Keep an eye on iTulip.com forum for analysis of the China slowdown.

    It's well worth putting on the reading list for analysis on China as well as the entire GFC.
    Last edited by davidbfpo; 07-04-2012 at 10:05 AM. Reason: Copied from China superpower thread to give context

  11. #11
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
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    Default Under the spotlight

    The BBC report, with links to three related reports, is from a Beijing-based correspondent:http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-16173768

    It is noteworthy that this incident is in Guangdong Province, the richest, most populous province and a quarter of it's exports. For a glimpse check:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guangdong

    Nearby are Hong Kong and Macau, which remain significant entry points and places to watch events from.

    With the exception of say a city like Shanghai and the national capital Beijing, this incident couldn't happen in a worse place IMHO.
    davidbfpo

  12. #12
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
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    Default From inside the revolt

    A BBC reporter has gained access to the town, his short report:http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-16195113
    davidbfpo

  13. #13
    Council Member bourbon's Avatar
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    Villagers say five people have been snatched from Wukan by police in recent days, prompting local people to mount nightly patrols to defend the village, he adds.
    The villagers should grab some cops or government officials as counterhostages.
    “[S]omething in his tone now reminded her of his explanations of asymmetric warfare, a topic in which he had a keen and abiding interest. She remembered him telling her how terrorism was almost exclusively about branding, but only slightly less so about the psychology of lotteries…” - Zero History, William Gibson

  14. #14
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
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    Default 'As villagers get smarter, they become harder to manage.'

    FP Blog has a good update on the situation in Wukan; it opens with:
    Peasants do not have a good record facing off with the Communist Party. Rural standoffs usually end with the arrest of the ringleaders and an increased security presence for the remaining residents. Yet on Thursday afternoon, Dec. 22, residents of the embattled village of Wukan scored a major achievement in their 11-day stand-off with local government, securing the release of one of the village's three detained leaders; the other two were released today.
    Then asks is Wukan a crisis barometer:
    The small farming village of 13,000 thousand embodies social changes brought about by more than 30 years of economic reforms in China.
    I would suggest not:
    ...most Wukanese stressed that they only wanted resolution of their local issues, and that they maintained trust in the Communist Party.
    Link:http://www.foreignpolicy.com/article...ption?page=0,0
    davidbfpo

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    Council Member TheCurmudgeon's Avatar
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    Default Chinese Riots over I-Phones - are they really the enemy of the future

    http://www.latimes.com/business/la-f...,7243366.story

    The Chinese have a burgeoning middle class and some commentators expect it to transition to to a democracy in the next twenty years.

    http://books.google.com/books/about/...d=T0Yvwq2eYTAC

    Is this really the country we want to hang our hats on as the new threat to the United States?
    "I can change almost anything ... but I can't change human nature."

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    Consumerism causes discontent amongst the haves and havenots.

    A great tool to disintegrate society?

    Who is doing it?

    Is it a part of a plan that is succeeding?

  17. #17
    Council Member MikeF's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray View Post
    Consumerism causes discontent amongst the haves and havenots.

    A great tool to disintegrate society?

    Who is doing it?

    Is it a part of a plan that is succeeding?
    Westernization and Modernization- part of the continued process of adding a Walmart and McDonalds in every city. This issue is better articulated by Samuel Huntington and Fareed Zakaria.

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    Council Member TheCurmudgeon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeF View Post
    Westernization and Modernization- part of the continued process of adding a Walmart and McDonalds in every city. This issue is better articulated by Samuel Huntington and Fareed Zakaria.
    With a middle class comes social and political change ala Huntington. The Western power are doing this but not through any coherent plan. As the middle class spreads there are two possible outcomes. First, slow transition to a more liberal form of "democracy" then is currently practiced in China or the "J-Curve" where there is a tightening of authority that goes too far and there is social upheaval (if they will riot over not getting the latest I-Phone just wait to see what they will do if you try to take them away).

    The question for the Western Liberal Democracies is how do you foster this change and where do our military fit into that transition.

    If China were to become a more democratic state but still very nationalist and very much wanting to demonstrate its renewed place as a major power in Asia what likelihood is there that it will use its military to demonstrate its power (versus using its economic influence as in the case of Africa)?

    What is China's military likely to do? Will it feel the need to continue the Maoist revolution and crack down independent of the Party or will it quietly accept the changes?

    What will happen in large part will be based on the value system of the middle class. If they remain Confucianist then change will probably come slowly if at all. If they embrace individualism then change may come sooner. I am assuming that if they are rioting for cell phones they are leaning towards individualism. In any case the rural poor will probably remain Confucionist and simply accept whatever the middle class dictate.
    Last edited by TheCurmudgeon; 01-15-2012 at 02:25 PM.
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  19. #19
    Council Member Dayuhan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCurmudgeon View Post
    With a middle class comes social and political change ala Huntington. The Western power are doing this but not through any coherent plan.
    I don't see how you can say that "the Western powers are doing this". They aren't, by plan or otherwise. he Chinese are doing it themselves.

    It's interesting too see people saying that "consumerism" spas strength and disintegrates society, when the strongest and most integrated societies on the planet are unabashedly consumerist.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheCurmudgeon View Post
    As the middle class spreads there are two possible outcomes. First, slow transition to a more liberal form of "democracy" then is currently practiced in China or the "J-Curve" where there is a tightening of authority that goes too far and there is social upheaval (if they will riot over not getting the latest I-Phone just wait to see what they will do if you try to take them away).
    A third alternative, and IMO most likely, is a serious economic crash followed by serious disorder. That could lead to a conservative backlash and an effort to return to the pure way of communism under military leadership, it could lead to the emergence of a more democratic order, or a whole buch of other things.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheCurmudgeon View Post
    The question for the Western Liberal Democracies is how do you foster this change and where do our military fit into that transition.
    A simple answer is that we don't do anything. We accept that it's not about us, and we watch.
    “The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary”

    H.L. Mencken

  20. #20
    Council Member Firn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray View Post
    Consumerism causes discontent amongst the haves and havenots.

    A great tool to disintegrate society?

    Who is doing it?

    Is it a part of a plan that is succeeding?
    Sounds almost like the great Satan is succeding in sapping the Dragons strenght before it is able to rise. Sometimes I think the cui bono gets streched a bit too far.

    In general the Western Way after WWII has led to far more equal societies then in pretty much ages before. This trend has been reversed to a different degree in Western countries, due to a couple of economic and political trends, but in general it is hard to find a period in which societies have been more equal and stable for such a long time. And that even at times such as this ones, with irregular mass protests in some countries and one of the European countries, Greece at the verge of bankruptcy.

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