Page 12 of 12 FirstFirst ... 2101112
Results 221 to 237 of 237

Thread: Iraq catch-all: after Operation Iraqi Freedom ended

  1. #221
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,167

    Default Inside The Surge An Interview With Prof Peter Mansoor Former Executive Officer To Gen

    The Surge in Iraq created a huge controversy in American politics when it started in 2007. There were arguments about whether the U.S. should send in more troops or withdraw its forces to solve Iraq’s increasing chaos. Since then there has been a lively discussion about how much of a factor the Surge was in combination with other events such as the sectarian cleansing of Baghdad, the Anbar Awakening, the Sons of Iraq, Moqtada al-Sadr’s cease fire, and more in reducing the violence in the country. To provide an inside view of the Surge is Professor Peter Mansoor the General Raymond E. Mason Jr. Chair of Military History at Ohio State University and General David Petraeus’ former Executive Officer from 2007-2008. He recently published a book about his experience during that time entitled Surge, My Journey with General David Petraeus and the Remaking of the Iraq War.

    continued

  2. #222
    Council Member carl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Denver on occasion
    Posts
    2,460

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JWing View Post
    The Surge in Iraq created a huge controversy in American politics when it started in 2007. There were arguments about whether the U.S. should send in more troops or withdraw its forces to solve Iraq’s increasing chaos. Since then there has been a lively discussion about how much of a factor the Surge was in combination with other events such as the sectarian cleansing of Baghdad, the Anbar Awakening, the Sons of Iraq, Moqtada al-Sadr’s cease fire, and more in reducing the violence in the country. To provide an inside view of the Surge is Professor Peter Mansoor the General Raymond E. Mason Jr. Chair of Military History at Ohio State University and General David Petraeus’ former Executive Officer from 2007-2008. He recently published a book about his experience during that time entitled Surge, My Journey with General David Petraeus and the Remaking of the Iraq War.

    continued
    That was a very fine interview. Very discouraging though in that Big Army and Big Navy got it wrong...again. And then they tried to sabotage the effort.

    I wonder if Gian Gentile will see this and respond.
    "We fight, get beat, rise, and fight again." Gen. Nathanael Greene

  3. #223
    Council Member carl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Denver on occasion
    Posts
    2,460

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JWing View Post
    Dr. Michael Knights of the Washington Institute for Near East Studies recently testified to a joint committee of the United States House of Representatives that Al Qaeda in Iraq (AQI) couldn’t help but overstep itself. During the early part of the Iraq War the Islamist organization tried to impose its foreign version of Islam upon Iraq, and intimidated and executed those that disagreed with it. It was actions such as those that eventually turned many Iraqis against it. Today, AQI is making a comeback establishing bases again within the country and carrying out a dizzying array of bombings. As the group looks to gain territory once again it is returning to its bad habits, which will eventually cost it sometime down the road.
    It will cost it but how long do you think it will take? If it takes at all. The last time they got fed up with AQ, the American Army was there. This time we won't be there. Will they be able to overthrow AQ without Bradley's to back them up?

    I've read that the takfiri killers are starting to impose similar regimes in the parts of Syria they control. How do you think it will play out there?
    "We fight, get beat, rise, and fight again." Gen. Nathanael Greene

  4. #224
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,167

    Default Divisions & AQI

    Hi Carl,
    Glad you liked the interview. Couple responses

    1) I've talked to people who worked in the govt & White House during the Bush years and they have different opinions on what happened. Some think the Bush admin was just as divided as others others say it was a real battle between organizations. It seems like each individual and institution had its own view of Iraq. Rumsfeld was against national building for example and wanted out of Iraq as soon as the invasion was over. Gen. Abizaid and Adm Fallon believed that the US was destabilizing Iraq so wanted out. The Joint Chiefs thought the troops deployments was breaking the military and wanted out. Rice & The NSC were looking for ways to win, etc. I take the view that there were deep internal divisions within the administration that hamstrung Iraq policy until 07 and the Surge.

    2) Al Qaeda seems to be taking a two different strategies in Syria & Iraq. In Syria they appear to be doing a lot of hearts & minds ops learning from Iraq. In Iraq however its all terror, although they are trying to portray themselves as the protector of the Sunnis. I think Iraq's previous experience with AQI is the reason why they're gaining little traction there.

  5. #225
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,167

    Default Aftermath of Shutting Down Ramadi Protest Site In Iraq

    On December 30, 2013, Iraq’s Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki in conjunction with Anbar Governor Ahmed Diab took down the protest site in Ramadi. The province was already inflamed by the arrest of Parliamentarian Ahmed Alwani two day before from the Iraqi Islamic Party who was one of the leaders of the demonstrations. Immediately fighting broke out in Ramadi and Fallujah, which has continued to the present time. This has brought the internal divisions within Anbar to the forefront with different groups and individuals coming out for and against Baghdad in this conflict. In the bigger picture, the premier’s actions have probably succeeded in turning a large part of Anbar opinion towards armed struggle, which will undermine Iraq’s already precarious security situation.

    continued

  6. #226
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,167

    Default Videos of Rebels in Anbar

    VIDEO: Fallujah Rebels Burn 6 Police Humvees

    http://musingsoniraq.blogspot.com/20...-6-police.html

    VIDEO: Revolution In Fallujah Burning Government Vehicles

    http://musingsoniraq.blogspot.com/20...h-burning.html

    ISLAMIC STATE OF IRAQ VIDEO: Al Qaeda In Iraq Fighters In Falluja

    http://musingsoniraq.blogspot.com/20...-qaeda-in.html

    VIDEO: Gunmen Driving Through Ramadi

    http://musingsoniraq.blogspot.com/20...gh-ramadi.html

    VIDEO: Mujahadeen In Control Of Fallujah, Jan. 1, 2014

    http://musingsoniraq.blogspot.com/20...-fallujah.html

  7. #227
    Council Member carl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Denver on occasion
    Posts
    2,460

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JWing View Post
    1) I've talked to people who worked in the govt & White House during the Bush years and they have different opinions on what happened. Some think the Bush admin was just as divided as others others say it was a real battle between organizations. It seems like each individual and institution had its own view of Iraq. Rumsfeld was against national building for example and wanted out of Iraq as soon as the invasion was over. Gen. Abizaid and Adm Fallon believed that the US was destabilizing Iraq so wanted out. The Joint Chiefs thought the troops deployments was breaking the military and wanted out. Rice & The NSC were looking for ways to win, etc. I take the view that there were deep internal divisions within the administration that hamstrung Iraq policy until 07 and the Surge.
    That's fascinating. Despite all the wrangling around here and other places over cointras, coindinistas, pop-centric, enemy centric and everything else, it may all have been a matter of divided command and a leader that needed to finally decide to take command and tell people what to do.
    "We fight, get beat, rise, and fight again." Gen. Nathanael Greene

  8. #228
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,167

    Default Bush Admin & Iraq

    I think that's what Mansoor would say. Before the Surge Bush delegated Iraq policy to the Pentagon and almost everyone there wanted out of Iraq. There was no real policy to win or beat the insurgency outside of some individual commanders out in the field. When things finally deteriorated into full scale civil war Bush suddenly realized that he had to do something and took more direct control and that's what led to the Surge, his constant video conferencing with Maliki, etc.

  9. #229
    Council Member CrowBat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Haxbach, Schnurliland
    Posts
    1,561

    Default

    Since around 20 December, the Iraqi Army is running an offensive against the ISIS in Anbar and Ninive Provinces. The operation in question is including units from the 1st and 7th Divisions of the Iraqi Army, plus air force assets like Beechcraft King Airs, Cessna AC-208s, and (recently acquired) Mi-35s of the Iraqi Air Force.

    Here a video of one of Mi-35 attacks:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6kE9FPr0l9U

    ...and here a King Air in action:
    http://www.aparat.com/v/Adqy6

  10. #230
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    11,799

    Default Basra invites British back for security role

    Almost an April Fool's Day headline I thought on reading, but it is not.

    Anxious to rid itself of the lawlessness that still plagues Iraq’s southern capital, Basra’s governor has hired a private military company run by a British general who helped capture the city from Saddam Hussein.
    Maj Gen Graham Binns, who is the chief executive of Aegis Defence Services, commanded the 7th Armoured Brigade when it led the siege of Basra in 2003.
    Four years later he supervised the handover of the city to Iraqi security forces. Now, amid growing concern about a fresh wave of terrorist violence across the country, Basra’s governor has invited Maj Gen Binns’s company back to assist at a “strategic level”.
    Link:http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl...rity-role.html
    davidbfpo

  11. #231
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,167

    Default Violence In Iraq’s Anbar Highlights Divided Tribes There

    As fighting continues in Iraq’s western Anbar province, the various tribes there have found themselves in a precarious situation. Some have aligned themselves with the central government against insurgents, some are opposed to both the federal forces and the militants, while still others have joined the gunmen. Anbar was always a very divisive place in part because of the deep-seated tribal rivalries. Those are all being exasperated by the current rebellion in the governorate.

    continued

  12. #232
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,167

    Default Iraq’s Premier Maliki Continues To Issue Arrest Warrants For Protest Leaders

    The fighting in Anbar has not stopped Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki from going after the leaders of the country’s protest movement. One of the original causes of the conflict in the governorate was the arrest of Iraqi Islamic Party Parliamentarian Ahmed Alwani who was known for giving inflammatory speeches about Shiites at the Ramadi sit-in square. Now Baghdad has warrants out for Sheikh Ali Hatem Sulaiman and Sheikh Mohammed Taha Hamdun both prominent members of the demonstrations.

    continued

  13. #233
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,167

    Default 2013 Ends With Deaths And Violence Going Up In Iraq

    2013 ended on a bad note for Iraq. The open rebellion in Anbar province against the central government was just the latest sign of the decline in the country’s security. Overall, violence increased last year as the insurgency, especially the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant saw a revival. That led to deaths being two to three times as high at the end of the year as the beginning. 2014 looks to be just as bad if not worse.

    continued

  14. #234
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,167

    Default Security In Iraq's Anbar Province December 2013

    Anbar is now in open rebellion against the Iraqi government. By December 2013 the signs were there that the province was about to explode. During the first two-thirds of the month there was a concerted effort to kill and intimidate local sheikhs. In the last part security incidents took off, and switched to targeting the security forces. That was topped off by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant’s (ISIS) ambush of the leadership of the 7th Division that led to the death of its commander and two brigade leaders. Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki then ordered a major offensive in the desert and border regions of Anbar, which was met by an upsurge in operations by the ISIS. Then the premier made a grave mistake by arresting Parliamentarian Ahmed Alwani who was a leader in the protest movement, and then had the Ramadi sit-in square closed down. That brought out tribes and the insurgency, and led to the current crisis.

    continued

  15. #235
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,167

    Default Islamic State of Iraq And The Levant Continues To Overplay Its Hand

    As the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS) attempts a comeback it continues to repeat the same mistakes that turned most of the country against it in the past. Part of its current Soldiers’ Harvest campaign is to gain and hold territory in Iraq. As a result it has moved into certain towns and cities and begun issuing warnings and orders to the population about what it will not accept based upon its interpretation of Islam. Recently it has banned wearing western clothing and listening to music. Another bad trend is its tendency to attack anyone that does not agree with it. These extremist ideas and tactics were exactly what the group did from 2004-2006, and which eventually led to groups like the Anbar Awakening and the Sons of Iraq being formed. These same missteps will likely cost it again, it is just a matter of time.

    continued

  16. #236
    Council Member Firn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,295

    Default

    If we consider it's history in Iraq and the reactions in Syria it sounds indeed quite likely, but of course one can not be sure that it will work out like that again.

    By the way does that ban on 'Western clothing' just go for women? ISIS fighters seem to wear partly just that.
    Last edited by Firn; 01-13-2014 at 07:32 PM.
    ... "We need officers capable of following systematically the path of logical argument to its conclusion, with disciplined intellect, strong in character and nerve to execute what the intellect dictates"

    General Ludwig Beck (1880-1944);
    Speech at the Kriegsakademie, 1935

  17. #237
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,167

    Default ISIS Banning Western Clothes

    That was for men. They said people couldn't wear t-shirts, slacks, ties, etc.! For women it was the traditional, cover themselves.

Similar Threads

  1. What happens in Iraq now?
    By MikeF in forum Catch-All, OIF
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-21-2011, 04:17 PM
  2. Freedom in the World 2009: Freedom Retreats for Third Year
    By Rex Brynen in forum International Politics
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-12-2009, 10:33 PM
  3. Top 10 USAID Strategic Accomplishments in Iraq
    By Jedburgh in forum The Information War
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-03-2006, 09:40 PM
  4. Situation Called Dire in West Iraq
    By SWJED in forum The Whole News
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 10-05-2006, 02:01 PM
  5. Election Day in Iraq
    By DDilegge in forum Iraqi Governance
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 12-27-2005, 08:42 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •