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Thread: Iraq's a Lost Cause? Ask the Real Experts

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    Default Iraq's a Lost Cause? Ask the Real Experts

    23 Nov. Los Angeles Times Op-Ed by Max Boot - Iraq's a Lost Cause? Ask the Real Experts.

    When it comes to the future of Iraq, there is a deep disconnect between those who have firsthand knowledge of the situation Iraqis and U.S. soldiers serving in Iraq and those whose impressions are shaped by doomsday press coverage and the imperatives of domestic politics.

    A large majority of the American public is convinced that the liberation of Iraq was a mistake, while a smaller but growing number thinks that we are losing and that we need to pull out soon...

    Yet in a survey last month from the U.S.-based International Republican Institute, 47% of Iraqis polled said their country was headed in the right direction, as opposed to 37% who said they thought that it was going in the wrong direction. And 56% thought things would be better in six months. Only 16% thought they would be worse.

    American soldiers are also much more optimistic than American civilians. The Pew Research Center and the Council on Foreign Relations just released a survey of American elites that found that 64% of military officers are confident that we will succeed in establishing a stable democracy in Iraq...

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    Default Public Ignores Iraq War Naysayers

    24 Nov. Washington Times - Public Ignores Iraq War Naysayers.

    Negative press coverage of the war in Iraq in recent weeks has emphasized rising pessimism among the American public about the conflict. But a new survey found that 56 percent of the public thinks that efforts to establish a stable democracy in the country will succeed.

    The survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press -- which also plumbed opinions of journalists, university presidents and others in academe, diplomats, government officials, religious leaders, members of the military, scientists and international security specialists -- revealed a marked disconnect between the perceptions of the general public and many of the so-called opinion leaders.

    When asked whether they thought democracy would succeed in Iraq, only 33 percent of the journalists agreed that it had a chance. The number was even worse in academe -- 27 percent of respondents thought the effort would succeed. Among the military, however, the number stood at 64 percent...

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