Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 125

Thread: Sudan Watch (to July 2012)

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Small Wars Journal SWJED's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Largo, Florida
    Posts
    3,989

    Default Sudan Watch (to July 2012)

    Moderators Note: This thread was a catch all thread for posts on the Sudan, there is a separate thread on 'South Sudan - stabilisation' and both contain a variety of subjects. On 6th July 2012 this thread was closed after a new catch all thread for Sudan 2012 was opened:
    http://council.smallwarsjournal.com/...ad.php?t=16026

    (ends)

    14 Jan. Reuters - U.N. Envoy Cites Darfur Failure; Wants 20,000 Troops.

    Attempts to bring peace to Sudan's Darfur region have failed and a U.N. peacekeeping force of 12,000 to 20,000 troops is needed to stop the killings and rape, the top U.N. official in Sudan said.

    Jan Pronk gave his most pessimistic assessment yet to the U.N. Security Council on Friday. He said marauding Arab militia were succeeding in their ethnic cleansing campaign, erasing village after village.

    "Looking back at three years of killings and cleansing in Darfur we must admit that our peace strategy so far has failed," Pronk said. "All we did was picking up the pieces and muddling through, doing too little too late."

    "At least once a month groups of 500 to 1000 militia on camel and horseback attack villages, killing dozens of people and terrorizing the others who flee away," Pronk said.

    The United Nations is contemplating a peacekeeping force in Darfur, where the African Union has fielded a force of 7,000 with a limited mandate and scarce funds. But U.N. peacekeeping officials have not planned for the high numbers of troops Pronk suggested...
    Last edited by davidbfpo; 07-06-2012 at 03:31 PM. Reason: Add Mods note updated today

  2. #2
    Small Wars Journal SWJED's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Largo, Florida
    Posts
    3,989

    Default Annan Pushes Bush on U.S. Troops for U.N. Darfur Force

    9 Feb Reuters - Annan Pushes Bush on U.S. Troops for U.N. Darfur Force.

    The United States should contribute troops and equipment to a planned new U.N. force designed to stop the killings and rape in Sudan's Darfur region, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said on Thursday.

    Annan said he would press President George W. Bush on the issue when the two meet on Monday in Washington, along with expected discussions on Iran, Iraq and the controversy over cartoons lampooning the Prophet Mohammad.

    Underfinanced African Union troops are now the only bulwark in Sudan against marauding militia and rebels, with some 7,000 monitors and soldiers on the ground. The U.N. Security Council this week authorized Annan to draw up contingency plans for U.N. peacekeepers to go into Darfur...

  3. #3
    Small Wars Journal SWJED's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Largo, Florida
    Posts
    3,989

    Default WFP: Lack of Security Threatens Darfur Relief Operation

    9 Feb Voice of America - WFP: Lack of Security Threatens Darfur Relief Operation.

    The World Food Program warns increasing insecurity in Sudan's conflict-ridden province of Darfur is jeopardizing its operations. The U.N. agency says attacks on food convoys and drivers are hampering efforts to get crucial supplies to thousands of needy people.

    The World Food Program says during the past two or three weeks, 20 trucks were attacked in northern and southern Darfur. WFP spokeswoman Christiane Berthiaume says this particularly dangerous area is under rebel control. She says it is unclear whether bandits or members of the Sudan Liberation Army are behind the attacks...

  4. #4
    Small Wars Journal SWJED's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Largo, Florida
    Posts
    3,989

    Default Bush Calls For More Muscle In Darfur

    18 Feb Washington Post - Bush Calls For More Muscle In Darfur .

    President Bush on Friday called for doubling the number of international troops in the war-ravaged Darfur region of Sudan and a bigger role for NATO in the peacekeeping effort.

    Bush has concluded that peace talks will not halt the violence that has left tens of thousands dead and more than 2 million homeless in Darfur and that a more muscular military response is required, administration officials said.

    After private talks with world leaders, including U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan, Bush decided to call for an additional 7,000 or more troops to be placed under U.N. command, along with the 7,000 African Union troops already there, because such an expansion would be the quickest way to intervene in the bloody conflict, the officials said. But many details of the policy shift need to be worked out, including how many U.S. troops would be part of the beefed-up international peacekeeping effort. Lt. Cmdr. Joe Carpenter, a Pentagon spokesman, said it is "premature to speculate" on potential increases in U.S. troops...

  5. #5
    Small Wars Journal SWJED's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Largo, Florida
    Posts
    3,989

    Default NATO Considering Putting Troops in Darfur

    11 June Voice of America - NATO Considering Putting Troops with African Units in Darfur by Al Pessin.

    Officials at NATO headquarters, and in NATO capitals across Europe and North America, are considering a request from the African Union to put western trainers into African military units that are trying to establish security in Sudan's Darfur region.

    NATO Secretary General Jaap de hoop Scheffer said the request to expand NATO's involvement in Darfur arrived in time to be discussed Thursday during the NATO defense ministers meeting.

    "That is a positive reaction to what has been discussed in the North Atlantic Council, and we are now moving on with this." Scheffer says.

    The head of NATO's Strategic Direction Center, British Colonel David Short is to put together a detailed mission plan, if NATO leaders approve the African request.

    "To me, this latest letter from the African Union is beginning to open a new chapter, if you like, in terms of NATO's engagement," Short says.

    Colonel Short says the A.U. request asks NATO to continue its current support for the Union's mission in Darfur - flying troops in and out of the region, helping with training and providing a liaison officer at the mission headquarters. But he says it also includes new requests, including the one involving NATO trainers working in Darfur in the A.U. units that have been deployed.

    "Could you look at, further, these sort of 'on the job' capacity building activities? By this, we are talking, potentially, about assisting units on the ground," Short says. "But, I would hasten to say that is very much something which needs further discussion and reconnaissance."

    Colonel Short says the A.U. request also asks NATO to expand its training of senior African officers, and to help establish a system for certifying that military units from the various countries are fully qualified to participate in the organization's military activities.

    No NATO official can say whether or when the alliance might expand its Darfur mission, as requested. But Colonel Short says the groundwork has been laid for the political decision and the potential military deployments.

    "I would not be held to a specific length of time, but because NATO and the North Atlantic Council have been warmed up to these as potential options - because, clearly, we have always tried to forward plan and anticipate what might come in - we have prepared work that can be launched very quickly," Short says.

    Years of violence involving militia groups and attacks on civilians have killed hundreds of thousands of people. The U.S. government and others have labeled it genocide. A peace accord reached last month has contributed to an increase in violence, as all groups have not accepted it.

    The U.N. Security Council has agreed to take over the African Union military effort in Darfur, but Sudan's government has not accepted the plan. A local leader told VOA on Friday, after meeting with a UN delegation, that the people will not accept troops from outside of Africa. A U.N. force could include both African and non-African troops, including possibly some from NATO countries.

    But at NATO military headquarters, Colonel Short says there is no plan for the alliance to organize forces to go to Darfur in large numbers to confront the militias themselves.

    He says training teams that may work with the deployed African forces would be small, and the African Union Mission in Sudan, known as AMIS, would still be responsible for trying to restore order in the region.

    "The key principle for the AMIS mission is that the Africans are looking for African solutions for African problems. They must remain in the lead. And NATO, who are just one of the partners, are there in support," Short says.

    Colonel Short and other officials say NATO will have to ask member nations to provide troops and equipment for the additional Darfur missions. NATO has a new Reaction Force standing by to respond to emergencies, but officials say the training and other services being requested by the African Union are not the type of mission the Force was created to handle.

  6. #6
    Small Wars Journal SWJED's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Largo, Florida
    Posts
    3,989

    Default Sudan - catch all thread

    Brokering Peace in Sudan by Major Patrick Christian, US Army. Special Warfare Magazine, March-April 2006.

    In August 2004, the author found himself in just such a role when he deployed to the Darfur region of Sudan as part of a small joint-special operations advisory team dispatched there by the commander of the Joint Special Operations Task Force-Horn of Africa. The team, deployed from Camp Lemonier, Djibouti, consisted of a Navy SEAL lieutenant commander, a Marine recon major, and the author, then an Army Special Forces major. The team was tasked to work as advisers to the African Union’s 12 military-observer teams, or MILOBS, which were attempting to document cease-fire violations among the multiple parties in Sudan’s civil war. The mission was simple: to keep the MILOBS collecting information on the conflict, as well as to stay positioned between the warring parties as advisers without getting killed in the process. The mission originated when the United States partnered with the European Union, or EU, in an effort to avoid a full-scale civil war in Sudan. The coalition focus is on funding and supporting the newly formed African Union, or AU, in a role designed to mediate between the Government of Sudan, or GoS (which is primarily in the control of the Northern Arab Sudanese), and the armed rebel groups in the Darfur region. The government-supported militias were created when the GoS armed a large number of Arab nomadic civilians, known as the Janjaweed. The Janjaweed have since begun attempting to clear the African Muslim tribes out of Darfur in a form of political/cultural cleansing...

  7. #7
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Stafford, VA
    Posts
    262

    Default

    I think one day, a new generation will review the death "scorecard" for Rwanda, DPR Congo, and the Sudan, and ask - "where was the global outrage and response?"

  8. #8
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Stafford, VA
    Posts
    262

    Default Diplomacy and Sudan

    So, the President will speak to Minni Minnawi, the head of the SLA from Darfur, but will not speak with Bashar Assad, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, or Kim Jong-il, all heads of state, for fear of sending the wrong message and rewarding bad behavior? I could be wrong, but I believe Minnawi has been indicted for war crimes by the ICC. What message does this send? Does this help the crisis in Darfur, Sudan?

  9. #9
    Council Member tequila's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    1,665

    Default

    An interesting article in CSMonitor: In Darfur, some Arabs now fight alongside rebels. Just as the Darfur rebel movements have fragmented, so too have the janjaweed militias. This is turning into a near-replica of the southern Sudanese disaster, which saw similar fragmentation.

    There was once only one reason for Tusher Mohamed Mahdi, a member of one of Darfur's many Arab tribes, to venture into the mountainous rebel enclave of Jebel Mara: to kill as many non-Arab guerrilla fighters and their supporters as possible.

    Now he comes here to take orders.

    Mr. Mahdi used to lead a band of 150 Arab fighters, part of the brutal janjaweed militia that fights as the Sudanese government's proxy army in the country's troubled Darfur region, which has seen more than 200,000 people killed and more than 2.5 million displaced since fighting erupted in 2003.

    But like a growing number of Arab militia leaders now disenchanted with the Sudanese government, he has thrown in his lot with the Sudan Liberation Army (SLA) rebel force, as Darfur's four-year conflict enters a new chapter.

    "In the beginning we were proud to fight because the government was telling us that all this land would belong to us," he says over a glass of sweet, black tea in the small hillside town of Gorolang Baje.

    "But later we discovered that would not be true."

    Rebel leaders claim that dozens of janjaweed commanders are joining their struggle against the Sudanese government after promises of land, cattle, and money proved worthless.

    In Jebel Mara they say 4,000 Arabs have bolstered their forces in the past year ...

  10. #10
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,098

    Default

    CH, 9 Jan 09: Against the Gathering Storm: Securing Sudan’s Comprehensive Peace Agreement
    This report is divided into four sections. The Introduction sets out the main provisions of the CPA and briefly assesses progress on these provisions. The second section highlights some of the main issues in the drafting and implementation of the CPA. The third section looks at existing trends towards fragmentation in Sudan, and tries to assess how they will play out in the next few years. The final section contains recommendations for international supporters of the CPA. One of the report’s main assumptions is that conflicts in Sudan arise from an unbalanced relationship between the centre and many of its peripheries. The report focuses on three or four areas of current or former conflict in Southern Sudan, Southern Kordofan and Darfur. There are important lessons to draw from conflicts and peace processes in other areas, such as Eastern Sudan, Blue Nile and parts of the Northern Nile Valley affected by dams. Rather than giving a tally of progress in these different peripheries, the report focuses on the often overlooked problem of the centre.

  11. #11
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    13,209

    Default Moderator's Note

    Moderators Note: This thread is a catch all thread for posts on the Sudan, except the current (Jan '10) thread on 'South Sudan - stabilisation' and contains a variety of subjects.

    The South Sudan thread is: http://council.smallwarsjournal.com/...ead.php?t=8460
    Last edited by davidbfpo; 02-01-2010 at 09:04 PM. Reason: Add link
    davidbfpo

  12. #12
    Small Wars Journal SWJED's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Largo, Florida
    Posts
    3,989

    Default Sudan OKs Peacekeepers for Darfur

    12 June LA Times - Sudan OKs Peacekeepers for Darfur by Maggie Farley.

    Sudan on Tuesday accepted a combined United Nations and African Union peacekeeping force of up to 23,000 troops and police to stabilize to the war-torn Darfur region.

    But U.N. diplomats, cautious after months of waffling by the regime, were not ready to celebrate a breakthrough.

    The agreement came before a Security Council mission to Khartoum on Saturday to press for an end to the government-stoked conflict in Darfur. At the end of a two-day summit of Sudanese, U.N. and African Union officials in Ethiopia, Sudan also agreed Tuesday on the need for an immediate cease-fire and peace talks with rebel groups to end four years of fighting.

    Sudan had initially agreed to the joint force in November, but it has backtracked and added conditions in the months since...

  13. #13
    Council Member sgmgrumpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ft Leavenworth Kansas
    Posts
    168

    Default

    Officials from the U.N., AU and Sudan met in Addis Ababa, the Ethiopian capital, to jump-start a three-stage plan for a joint force to back up 7,000 overwhelmed and underpaid African Union troops already in Darfur.
    How about NOT being paid.

    Well hopefully the UN will not screw up the payment of the soldiers as the AU did almost often as noted in this SA blg on his year tour of duty in al-fashier under a AU hat.

    I recall numerous problems with NIBATTS and ECOMOG forces in other peacekeeping duties under the blue hat, not getting paid on time and soldiers/units going as far as refusing to get onto helo transports until they were paid. Pretty bad when your trying to insert PKs into area because the place is about to get real bad in a hurry and all they need to do is pay them.

    I would think they had it right by now since the 90s, but after reading some of the blogs, it's obvious some things never change.


    I hope the UN don't screw this one up.


    If you want the truth, anything more than Boots on the Ground is BS.

    http://rsasoldier.blogspot.com/searc...max-results=20

    http://www.rsasoldier.blogspot.com/


    On another note: 32 AMIS Camps where built by PAE. Here is a report to GAO on Darfur. Good resource for background information. Another interesting note is that of the 16 authorized US Military Observers, only 11 were filled at the time of report.? Probably figure out why.

    GAO Report on Darfur Nov 2006
    http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d079.pdf
    Last edited by sgmgrumpy; 06-13-2007 at 07:53 PM. Reason: Additional Info

  14. #14
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    The Green Mountains
    Posts
    356

    Default Peacekeepers to Darfur?

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...cle2174209.ece

    Looks like most of the developed world won't be putting boots on the ground though.

  15. #15
    Council Member marct's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    3,682

    Default China?

    I'm on one of the Darfur support lists and this just came ver it.

    NBA Dream Team Rallies for Darfur
    For immediate release - May 10, 2007
    Contact: Jill Savitt, Dream for Darfur, (917)-941-3530, Jill.Savitt@dreamfordarfur.org
    Steve Kauffman, for Ira Newble, (310) 456-5400, Ksmg4@aol.com

    NBA “Dream Team of Conscience” Urges China to Protect the People of Darfur
    Cleveland Cavalier Ira Newble Rallies Players to Stop the Genocide

    Cleveland – May 10 – Cleveland Cavalier small forward Ira Newble announced today that 11 of his teammates have joined him in co-signing an open letter to the government of the People’s Republic of China, urging the Chinese government to take immediate action on the crisis in Darfur, in advance of the 2008 Summer Olympic Games in Beijing. Read the full text of the letter and signatures.


    “I have been distraught about the crisis in Darfur, and especially with recent news that shows the situation has not improved – and more innocent people are continuing to die,” said Newble. “China is playing a major role in the crisis. The 2008 Beijing Olympics gives professional athletes the chance to speak out about the ideas of peace and brotherhood that the Olympics represent. I urge all athletes to ask China to do what it can to protect civilians in Darfur.” For information on China’s role in the Darfur crisis, see below.

    More...
    Sic Bisquitus Disintegrat...
    Marc W.D. Tyrrell, Ph.D.
    Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies,
    Senior Research Fellow,
    The Canadian Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies, NPSIA
    Carleton University
    http://marctyrrell.com/

  16. #16
    Council Member Tom Odom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    DeRidder LA
    Posts
    3,949

    Default Unamid

    26,000 personnel--7,000 AU, 6400 UN civilians, 12500 other military, supposedly to come mainly from Africa with US airlift and money, British financial aid and logistics. All of this is supposedly to be finalized in 90 days.

    I will be quite surprised if they do it in 90 days. I am equally doubtful they will be able to draw another 12,000 troops from Africa. MONUC in the Congo has been and still is a struggle with 16,700 troops, 700 milobs, 1000 police, and 1800 expatriate civilian workers (permanent or UN volunteer).

    Plus one can make the argument that the Congo is relatively developed when it comes to infrastructure avaliable when compared to Darfur and Kordofan.

    Tom
    Last edited by Tom Odom; 07-31-2007 at 06:33 PM.

  17. #17
    Small Wars Journal SWJED's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Largo, Florida
    Posts
    3,989

    Default In Sudan, Help Comes From Above

    6 July NY Times commentary - In Sudan, Help Comes From Above by Julie Flint.

    The one bright light in the dismal international response to the slaughter and starvation in Sudan’s Darfur region has been a humanitarian effort that has kept more than two million displaced people alive. In the fifth year of the war, mortality levels among Darfurians reached by relief are marginally better than they were before the war and lower than in the capital, Khartoum. In South Sudan, where conflict is stilled, children have higher death rates and lower school enrollment.

    This is a formidable achievement, better than in any comparable war zone in Africa. Credit the likes of Oxfam, Mercy Corps and Doctors Without Borders, and their 13,000-strong army of relief workers — 90 percent of them Sudanese.

    Yet these successes will be lost if Democratic presidential candidates get their wish: a no-flight zone that is militarily enforced over Darfur. The idea, supported by Senator Hillary Clinton and others, is that this would pressure the Sudan government into allowing the immediate deployment of a joint United Nations-African Union peacekeeping force. “If they fly into it, we will shoot down their planes,” Mrs. Clinton said last week at a Democratic presidential debate. “It is the only way to get their attention.”

    Aid agencies are quietly appalled by the prospect of a no-flight zone. They believe Khartoum would respond by grounding humanitarian aircraft and, at worst, by forcing aid agencies to leave. Even if Khartoum didn’t ground flights, the United Nations most likely would, for fear of sending its planes into a potential combat zone. Without humanitarian air access, Darfurians would soon suffer lethal health and food crises...

  18. #18
    Council Member Tom Odom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    DeRidder LA
    Posts
    3,949

    Default Janjaweed and Erstwhile Enemies

    Why you have to love, Sudan

    From a safe distance....
    Darfur conflict takes unexpected turn
    NERTITI, Sudan — As far as Osman Ahmed could tell, the clashes that forced his family out of their home and into a dismal refugee camp last month were no different from the attacks that have devastated Darfur for four years and counting.

    "The village was totally burned and looted. It was the janjaweed," said Ahmed, a tired-looking man in a long white gown, invoking the name of the government-sponsored Arab militias responsible for most of the recent carnage in western Sudan.

    But Ahmed, who fled immediately with his family to safety in Nertiti, about seven miles away, wasn't around to see what happened the following day. Darfur rebels retaliated by striking a nearby government security station, and their allies in the attack were also Arab janjaweed.

  19. #19
    Council Member Tom Odom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    DeRidder LA
    Posts
    3,949

    Default AU Peacekeepers

    a related article on the AU peacekeepers in Darfur:
    Unpaid, underequipped African peacekeepers struggle in Darfur
    EL FASHER, Sudan — The white pickup emblazoned with the initials “AMIS” — for African Union Mission in Sudan — slowed down near the entrance to a refugee camp in northern Darfur. A young boy in grubby clothes appeared at the side of the road.

    Sitting at the wheel, David Eklu, a Ghanaian peacekeeper, lifted an arm to wave at the boy. The boy raised his right arm — and hurled a handful of rocks at Eklu’s car.

    Eklu sighed and drove on. “That has happened before,” he said.

    To the war-weary people of Darfur, nothing seems to symbolize the international community’s inability to end the four-year-old conflict more than the 7,000 A.U. peacekeepers stationed here.

    Tasked with monitoring a cease-fire that the Sudanese government and rebel groups have never taken seriously, the peacekeepers find themselves the targets of growing hostility from civilians — and, more worryingly, the armed factions.

    In April, unidentified gunmen killed seven peacekeepers in three attacks over two weeks. In the most brazen assault, a Ghanaian peacekeeper was murdered in a carjacking just a few hundred yards from the mission’s Darfur headquarters in El Fasher, within sight of fellow peacekeepers. The guards, from the Gambia, allowed the assailants to get away, and no pursuit was ordered.

  20. #20
    Council Member Stan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Estonia
    Posts
    3,817

    Default

    Tom,
    Starting to sound like the (slaughtered) Belgian Peace Keepers in Rwanda and the French in Goma...All over again

    I somewhat agree that the African Peace Keepers have an edge, but as far as being more capable, that's been seen one too many times before. I can just barely imagine the Zairian troops holding back the former Rwandan Army in Goma amidst the --ahem-- chaos

    Seems we haven't learned too much from more than a decade ago. It's that, or few have taken the time to read the countless reports!

    Regards,

    Stan

Similar Threads

  1. South Sudan: Watching a fragile nation
    By M-A Lagrange in forum Africa
    Replies: 209
    Last Post: 11-05-2018, 12:33 PM
  2. COIN case: LRA Lords Resistance Army
    By SWJED in forum Africa
    Replies: 259
    Last Post: 06-03-2018, 02:47 PM
  3. Agreement to Print Somali Currency in Sudan
    By M-A Lagrange in forum The Whole News
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-13-2010, 01:08 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •