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Thread: Rhodesian COIN (consolidated thread, inc original RLI)

  1. #241
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
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    Default A possible clue

    There are a few people who will know more! Could it be the work of Lord Richard Cecil, see:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_Richard_Cecil

    The RLI have an active regimental association and at least one poster here belongs and they'll belong along shortly.
    davidbfpo

  2. #242
    Council Member Rhodesian's Avatar
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    Default The RLI Association

    Hi
    The RLI Association can be found at http://www.therli.com assuming you're not already aware. I personally don't know of this specific documentary, but there are contact details for the various sub-branches within the Contact Us tab of the association's web page, and someone may know of the work you speak of. There are also a few DVD's out there that have been collated and produced in the last few years, and it may be that the footage can be found in one of them? Try http://www.rhodesianvideos.mazoe.com/

    Wish you well in your search, let us know if/where you find it, a few folks here would be interested.

    Cheers
    I.R.

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    Quote Originally Posted by davidbfpo View Post
    There are a few people who will know more! Could it be the work of Lord Richard Cecil, see:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_Richard_Cecil

    The RLI have an active regimental association and at least one poster here belongs and they'll belong along shortly.
    Richard Cecil and Nic Downie's work "Frontline Rhodesia" was first aired on Thames TV in early 1979 (I'm pretty sure)

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    Quote Originally Posted by H3nnys View Post
    Hi Guys

    I would like to know if anyone knows the name of the Documentery that was shot in 1974 of the RLI

    I saw it once many years ago and one of the chapters or scenes was shot with my fathers troop at mount darwin in 1974 and I think it was in Afrikaans although I can not remember as I was still a young boy when I saw it

    I am desperately looking for the movie again and was hoping that someone here might know what it was called

    Thank you
    You probably need to go to youtube and do a video search under "Rhodesia". 1974 were the early days. Try this Video

    If you private message me some more details on your father I'll try to steer you in the right direction.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhodesian View Post
    Howzit - Apologies if the following webpage has been highlighted elsewhere, I missed it. This is a blog containing the notes etc for a book no longer being written, called Choppertech.

    http://choppertech.blogspot.com/

    It contains some fascinating insights into Fire Force as seen from the Tech/Gunners point of view, and includes many operational notes/logs of both internal operations and the strikes inside Mozambique etc.

    Cheers
    I.R.
    I.R., it is important that Beaver's book gets published. Please go to his blog and leave a message to that effect. He must be encouraged to finish the job.

    Did you know that he was the gunner who shot down that Botswana Defence Force Islander (fixed wing aircraft) with his side mounted 20mm cannon in his Allouette III gunship during a cross border scene in Botswana?
    Last edited by JMA; 08-08-2010 at 09:59 AM.

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    Default Ron Reid-Daly

    It is with deep regret and sadness to the RLI, Selous Scouts and Rhodesian forces fraternity that uncle Rod Reid-Daly passed away peacefully at home on the 9th of August 2010. RIP Uncle Ron.

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    I never meet the man. Only know of him by his book, and by what others have said about him. From what little I know, his passing is a loss to many.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JMA View Post
    It is with deep regret and sadness to the RLI, Selous Scouts and Rhodesian forces fraternity that uncle Rod Reid-Daly passed away peacefully at home on the 9th of August 2010. RIP Uncle Ron.
    A Celebration of the Life of Lt Col Ron Reid Daly was held in Cape Town on 20 August 2010


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    Default Rhodesian veteran reaches out to US veterans through ARC

    Proud bear the news that one of our veterans is assisting "hurt" US veterans through the American Red Cross.

    Art From the Heart

    In August, American Red Cross Fort Bragg will be working with Artist Craig Bone and the Army Wounded Warrior Career Program, Warrior Transition Brigade and the Wounded Warrior FRG to identify 12 artistic Wounded Warrior soldiers who are transitioning to civilian life and are interested in pursuing painting or art as a new career. The 12 soldiers who are chosen for the project will get to work with Craig Bone, a well known and respected painter and former Rhodesian Light Infantry soldier, to foster their creative abilities before returning to civilian life. By beginning this process before going into the civilian sector, it will create a stable goal that the service member can hold onto once reentering the civilian world. Each member will work with Craig Bone to create a piece of art and develop the inspiration or the back story to go along with it.

    At the end of the project, each member will get the opportunity to have their piece, as well as their back story, published in a book. Each soldier choosing to be published will retain 100% rights to their painting and story, as well as, receive any proceeds they may earn from the sales of the book. Members of the program who do not choose to publish their work will still retain all rights to their work and any other work they do in the course.

    For the duration of the project, Craig Bone will relocate to Ft. Bragg in order to be closer to his students. The program is anticipated to take place from August-October.

    The project will kick off with an official Open House at the main Red Cross office on Ft. Bragg. This will give the community an opportunity to become aware of the project, meet the artist, and gain information about other valuable Red Cross resources available. As a closure to the project, the Red Cross will host another open house to do a final exhibition of the art created during the course.

    All supplies and space will be donated by the Red Cross.
    I served with Craig although he was in (Lt) Roddy Smith's Troop when seriously wounded by a mortar attack whilst on operations in Mozambique. Here is a bio of Craig:

    Craig Bone was born in Salisbury, Rhodesia in 1955. He studied Graphic Art at Natal University in South Africa.
    In 1973 Craig returned to Rhodesia to perform his National Service in the Rhodesian Light Infantry. During this time he painted vivid scenes of combat and was totally immersed in the war. Craig was severely wounded by a mortar attack, which almost cost him his legs and his life, subsequently his focus turned to painting full time.

    Craig has since devoted his time, energy and skills to helping various organizations and charities.

    Craig’s strong sense of community spirit and his passion for the military has encouraged him to support veteran programs throughout the United States and in Zimbabwe. Most recently, Craig has raised over $100,000 for the Safari Club International Veterans Committee which supports soldiers from Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraqi battlefields who have been wounded during active duty. His painting, entitled “Earth, Wind and Fire,” is a depiction of the reality of the Vietnam War and honors the sacrifice of American soldiers. This work of art presently hangs in the Pentagon. Craig is currently working on similar projects connected to the Iraq and Afghanistan War.

    Craig has been awarded the Safari Club Medal of Valor for his consistent support and dedication to
    the Veteran’s Committee, and in 2003, Craig was also awarded the Safari Club International Wildlife Artist of the year. Due to his obvious passion and support of veteran programs, Craig was honored to participate in the official opening of Fort Bragg’s Airborne and Special Operations Museum in North Carolina. Within his own community, Craig has volunteered his time to the Cancer center Health park of Fort Myers, Florida.

    Recently, Craig was approached and commissioned to paint a portrait of the Zulu King, Goodwill
    Zwelithini KaBhekuzulu, the reigning king of Zululand.
    I believe this painting may be the one referred to:

    Earth, Wind and Fire



    and another one...

    Hill 65, 8th Of November, 1965
    Sacrifice and Valor
    Last edited by davidbfpo; 08-30-2010 at 09:51 AM. Reason: Tidy up quote spacing

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    Default Obituary Lt Col Ron Reid-Daly

    Lieutenant-Colonel Ron Reid-Daly

    Lieutenant-Colonel Ron Reid-Daly, who has died aged 81, was the colourful and outspoken founder and commander of the Selous Scouts regiment, whose unorthodox tactics during Rhodesia's bush war against nationalist insurgents were as effective as they were controversial.

  11. #251
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    Default Op Dingo - Chimoio

    ‎33 years ago today, right now I was sitting in the briefing in the hanger at New Sarum air base prior to the first Chimoio raid with 96 SAS guys, 103 other RLI guys and a whole bunch of Blue Jobs. H-hour was 07h45 on 23 November 1977... they didn't know what hit them.

    ...and no it wasn't a refugee camp.

    RIP - Frans Nel (SAS) and Phil Haigh (Air Force)
    Last edited by JMA; 11-22-2010 at 03:09 PM.

  12. #252
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    Default An existential war?

    Not enough gunships? A Cessna will do. Take off the door, mount a 30-Browning on the floor (with a primitive sight) operated by your mate, the gunner and next door farmer and sit on a flak jacket to prevent unwanted penetration of the nether regions... and there you have a Cessna gunship... Rhodesian style. They got some.



    Throwing hand grenades out the door was also an attack variation.

    As they say, don't just sit there and do nothing... do something, anything.
    Last edited by JMA; 11-30-2010 at 02:27 PM.

  13. #253
    Council Member IntelTrooper's Avatar
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    Default

    Don't know if this has been posted before or is in the right thread -- just happened across this on YouTube. Might be of interest to some folks.

    Rhodesia Unafraid (Part 1)
    "The status quo is not sustainable. All of DoD needs to be placed in a large bag and thoroughly shaken. Bureaucracy and micromanagement kill."
    -- Ken White


    "With a plan this complex, nothing can go wrong." -- Schmedlap

    "We are unlikely to usefully replicate the insights those unencumbered by a military staff college education might actually have." -- William F. Owen

  14. #254
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    Default You need top cover for convoys?

    You fit a few 30 browning gun pods under the wings and Bob's you uncle...



    No. 1953. Beech V35A Bonanza (VP-WHM)

    The guns were fired by solenoids which were activated by a push-to-talk button on the control column. The sighting mechanism was very simple, yet effective. A fold-out arm with a ring sight on it was snapped into place. A dot on the windshield provided the second reference - line up the dot in the ring, put both on the target and press the trigger.
    So if you are ever faced with an existential war your CAS options are limited only by your imagination.

    Now if you really want to upgun this kite you do the following:

    A further modification was done to the aircraft - unfortunately I don't have any photos of it - which provided my father the ability to drop a series of three or five grenades from the bottom of the aircraft. Basically, there was a hole in the floor (which was normally sealed with a resin plug) between the co-pilot's feet. The grenades were stored in steel tubes in a removable armoured box right behind the pilot and observer, directly over the C of G. All pins were removed from the grenades; the handles were held in place by the walls of the tube. The tube was blocked on both ends by means of two large steel pins, and locked in place by split pins (re-used from the grenades). A spring loaded cap was fitted to the top-end of the tube. At the required time the resin plug was removed from the floor and the tube was attached over the hole in the floor and locked in place. The top pin was removed causing the spring loaded cap to exert pressure on the grenades. A cable was attached to the bottom pin by means of a dog-leash clip. On final approach to the target, the bottom safety pin was removed. Once over the target, the cable was pulled, removing the bottom pin and causing the spring loaded cap to force the grenades from the tube. A further safety device was available and used in the event of a 'hang-up' in the tube. I had to use it on two separate occasions. While not very scientific it worked... Dad would hold the aircraft very steady and I would carefully remove the spring loaded cap, take a small pole (cut from a mopane tree) and push the hung-up grenades out the tube.
    I kid you not.

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    Default RLI - 50th Birthday - 1 February 2011

    RLI BIRTHDAY – 1 FEBRUARY

    On 1 February 1961 the all white Rhodesian Light Infantry was formed as a result of growing concerns within Rhodesia over the shape post colonial Africa was taking (and anticipated would take) where the colonial order had given way to brutal dictatorships and economic collapse often at the hands of the ex-colonial African troops. By September 1961 the RLI were deployed to the Congo border and border control duties to prevent the chaos resulting from the attempted secession of the province of Katanga from spilling over into the then Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland.

    After the Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) in 1965 the insurgency began to increase steadily over time until 1973 by when the RLI had elements permanently deployed on border control and internal operations all the time. The 1974 coup d’etat in Portugal and the ensuing collapse of their colonies exposed Rhodesia to an additional 1,200km of border across which insurgents could infiltrate. To maximise the use of limited forces and to ensure a rapid ability to concentrate those forces the Fire Force concept was developed using Air Force Allouette III helicopters and Lynx (Cessna 337) CAS piston-engined aircraft and primarily the RLI.

    The ruthless efficiency of the joint Air Force and RLI Fire Force operations where the RLI was deployed by helicopter and later also by parachute was to account for the deaths of in excess of 12,000 insurgents during the course of the war at a rate of 160 enemy killed for every one of their own lost: a truly remarkable record. By mid 1976 the RLI comprised about half conscripted Rhodesian National Servicemen and of the balance there was a large representation of Brits, Americans, Canadians, Australians and others. Ultimately recruits from some 35 different nationalities passed through the RLI.

    Periodically withdrawn from Fire Force operations to take part in cross-border operations into neighbouring Zambia and Mozambique together with the Rhodesian Special Air Service (SAS) and supported by the Air Force the RLI was party to inflicting further immense damage to externally based insurgent forces and their logistic support.

    On 31 October 1980, after a short but action packed nineteen year existence, the RLI was disbanded after the political settlement which arose from the Lancaster House Conference where nationalist and guerrilla leader, Robert Mugabe, was declared winner of an election marred by massive intimidation and became Prime Minister of the newly independent Zimbabwe.

    However, the RLI lives on and on 1 February 2011 will celebrate its 50th birthday. Functions and gatherings both large and small will be held around the world to remember the regiment, honour the fallen and celebrate together the good times when all were young and soldiered with “the incredible” Rhodesian Light Infantry.

  16. #256
    Council Member William F. Owen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMA View Post
    Not enough gunships? A Cessna will do. Take off the door, mount a 30-Browning on the floor (with a primitive sight) operated by your mate, the gunner and next door farmer and sit on a flak jacket to prevent unwanted penetration of the nether regions... and there you have a Cessna gunship... Rhodesian style.
    The US had been using Cessna O-1's, O-2's and all sorts of light aircraft through out the 1960's and well into the mid-1970's. Talk to any of the "SPAF" - Sneaky Pete's Air Force - and they all have stories of dropping grenades out of the window.

    ....but today, 40 years on, it's like using Bleriot's 1909 plane in the Battle of Britain. Modern armies and airforces should not be looking to emulate products of improvisation. A modernised derivative of an AU-23 is about as low as anyone should go, and even the case of that is pretty tough to make.
    Infinity Journal "I don't care if this works in practice. I want to see it work in theory!"

    - The job of the British Army out here is to kill or capture Communist Terrorists in Malaya.
    - If we can double the ratio of kills per contact, we will soon put an end to the shooting in Malaya.
    Sir Gerald Templer, foreword to the "Conduct of Anti-Terrorist Operations in Malaya," 1958 Edition

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    Quote Originally Posted by William F. Owen View Post
    The US had been using Cessna O-1's, O-2's and all sorts of light aircraft through out the 1960's and well into the mid-1970's. Talk to any of the "SPAF" - Sneaky Pete's Air Force - and they all have stories of dropping grenades out of the window.

    ....but today, 40 years on, it's like using Bleriot's 1909 plane in the Battle of Britain. Modern armies and airforces should not be looking to emulate products of improvisation. A modernised derivative of an AU-23 is about as low as anyone should go, and even the case of that is pretty tough to make.
    Posting the Cessna and Beechcraft photos was just for info and for fun.

    You can off-set the stuff private individuals got up to to support the war effort against wars and operations that grind to halt when the GPS batteries run down.

    Modern blinkered soldiering which frowns upon the use of initiative, improvisation and extemporization by junior commanders (down to junior NCOs) is worse off for this serious error of judgement.

    The problems with converting light commercial piston engined aircraft to a weapons delivery role are the limited payload and the ability to find pilots with the balls to fly them (in a combat role). And in the absence of SAMs (SA-7/Grail/or equivalent) are still viable in most of the world, 90% of Africa, a lot of Asia, South America and a bunch of islands.

  18. #258
    Council Member William F. Owen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMA View Post
    The problems with converting light commercial piston engined aircraft to a weapons delivery role are the limited payload and the ability to find pilots with the balls to fly them (in a combat role). And in the absence of SAMs (SA-7/Grail/or equivalent) are still viable in most of the world, 90% of Africa, a lot of Asia, South America and a bunch of islands.
    I'd strongly agree. Many nations buy combat aircraft they just do not need.
    Infinity Journal "I don't care if this works in practice. I want to see it work in theory!"

    - The job of the British Army out here is to kill or capture Communist Terrorists in Malaya.
    - If we can double the ratio of kills per contact, we will soon put an end to the shooting in Malaya.
    Sir Gerald Templer, foreword to the "Conduct of Anti-Terrorist Operations in Malaya," 1958 Edition

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    Quote Originally Posted by William F. Owen View Post
    I'd strongly agree. Many nations buy combat aircraft they just do not need.
    ... nor can maintain nor can operate...

    The South African Air Force currently musters 23 operational fighter aircrew.

    ...58 of 167 helicopter pilot posts (34%) are currently vacant... 30% of posts for transport pilots are vacant (48 of 156 posts)... the shortage of air traffic controllers, where only 29 of 77 posts (37%) are filled... a shortage of engineers with only 70 of 130 posts (54%) filled... read here

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    Default RLI 50th Birthday - Remembrance Service

    Over the weekend 4/5 February 2011 the RLI held a 50th Anniversary Reunion and Remembrance Service.



    View larger image here

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