Page 17 of 19 FirstFirst ... 71516171819 LastLast
Results 321 to 340 of 377

Thread: Iraq in 2017

  1. #321
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    728 dead 549 wounded in Iraq in September. Full break down of violence during the month. Here's a link.

  2. #322
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    12,289

    Default The Myth and Reality of Iraq’s al-Hashd al-Shaabi

    A report (19 pgs) from Germany by a US defence academic @ NDU, Hassan Abbas, whose speciality is Pakistan and the region. Not yet read, but these Iraqi non-state forces rarely get extensive coverage.

    The long title: 'The Myth and Reality of Iraq’s al-Hashd al-Shaabi (Popular Mobilization Forces):A Way Forward'.

    The paper aims to:
    The policy paper focuses on three primary issues: a) the prevailing status and workings of the Hashd forces; b) relevance of local and regional politics to the security dynamics of Iraq; and c) policy recommendations for the Iraqi government and its allies on how to think about the future of the Hashd and secure Iraq better. For this purpose, a range of questions are framed for analytical purposes dealing with the strength and weaknesses of the Hashd forces, their local and regional sponsors, their capabilities and activities on the ground including allegations of human rights violations, concerns of Sunni Iraqis with regard to sectariandimensions of this phenomenon and last but not the least as regards the agenda and planning of the Iraqi government for security sector reform.
    Link:http://library.fes.de/pdf-files/bueros/amman/13689.pdf
    davidbfpo

  3. #323
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    Hawija op is entering final phase. Here's a link.

  4. #324
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    Hawija town liberated op almost over in southern Kirkuk. Link to article.

  5. #325
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    12,289

    Default Political Primacy, Strategic Risks, and ISIL after the Caliphate

    A short article recommended via a "lurker" via a Dutch CT site that circulated it and the link is to the original publisher. The author is Craig Whiteside and his bio in part states:
    Dr. Craig Whiteside is an Associate Fellow at ICCT and an Associate Professor for the Naval War College Monterey and teaches at the Naval Postgraduate School. He is a senior associate with the Center on Irregular Warfare and Armed Groups at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island and lectures at the U.S. Air Force Special Operations School.
    Link:https://www.iraqincontext.com/single...-the-Caliphate
    davidbfpo

  6. #326
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    Craig writes some of the best stuff on Iraqi security and IS.

  7. #327
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    Security report for 1st week of October in Iraq. 2nd lowest number of incidents and lowest casualty figures recorded in 2017. Here's a link.

  8. #328
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    Hawija operation is done, Iraqi forces heading back to finish off West Anbar. Here's a link.

  9. #329
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    Gun battle between Iraqi forces and Peshmerga almost broke out in Kirkuk as Baghdad and Irbil continue to escalate things after the Kurdish referendum. Here's a link to the article.

  10. #330
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    My early take on the fighting that broke out between federal forces and Peshmerga in Kirkuk and Salahaddin.

  11. #331
    Council Member CrowBat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Haxbach, Schnurliland
    Posts
    1,561

    Default

    Let me recapitulate to see if I've got everything right: well before it's ever got as far as to finish the Daesh in Iraq, the Iraqi government (read: IRGC) turned against Kurds in northern Iraq....and thus delivered a coup de grace upon 15 years of failed US 'foreign policy' in that country.

    And the 'most effective fighters against the Daesh' - turned on their heels and fled, as soon as they were not supported by US and allied air power...

    Oh man, what a surprise.

  12. #332
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    12,289

    Default No artillery, war ends; now no air support Kurds exit

    Quote Originally Posted by CrowBat View Post
    Let me recapitulate to see if I've got everything right: well before it's ever got as far as to finish the Daesh in Iraq, the Iraqi government (read: IRGC) turned against Kurds in northern Iraq....and thus delivered a coup de grace upon 15 years of failed US 'foreign policy' in that country.

    And the 'most effective fighters against the Daesh' - turned on their heels and fled, as soon as they were not supported by US and allied air power...

    Oh man, what a surprise.
    Not that the Kurds have not found themselves in this position before. Long ago (probably 1974-1975) it was the withdrawal of Imperial Iranian artillery support for their conflict with the Iraqis that led to their defeat.

    From this armchair and with limited reading could the Iraqi use of the CTS (a multi-ethnic formation historically) have helped limit the willingness to fight? Plus the use of the Federal Police.

    Whatever the Kurd's claim to Kirkuk wasn't there always doubt that the Peshmerga would fight outside it's traditional mountainous area?
    Last edited by davidbfpo; 10-17-2017 at 10:04 AM. Reason: 73,880v
    davidbfpo

  13. #333
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    Kurds split politically led to collapse in Kirkuk. They could've fought but would've lost to govt forces.

  14. #334
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    Political ramifications of what happened in Kirkuk. Here's a link to the article.

  15. #335
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    845

    Default From Hudson Institute's Samuel Tadros

    Via Twitter: https://twitter.com/Samueltadros/sta...72827647303680

    A few thoughts on developments in Kurdistan this week:


    • 1. Collapse of Peshmerga took many by surprise. It shouldnt. Yes Kurds claim Kirkuk as their Jerusalem
    • But Kirkuk and other disputed territories remain deeply divided and contested among various ethnic and religious groups
    • It matters if you are fighting to defend your home or not. It's the same story as with the “Iraqi army” defending Mosul in 2014
    • Simply put: tribal troops don’t fight well outside their tribal areas, which brings me to the second point



    • 2. The performance of the Peshmerga & Kurds in general since 03 has blinded many to the weakness of modernity & strength of tribal identity
    • Same blindness is evident when scholars approach Egypt. Blinded by the superficial modernity, they think Egypt is different from region.
    • They assume it is a modern state and that sub-national identities don't matter dismissing tribal and family frameworks
    • I am happy to repeat this a million times until it gets through. The region, all of it, is just Tribes with Flags.
    • In Kurds case, they arent even one tribe. Not disputing Kurdish nationalism. If someone identifies as a Kurd, who am I to tell him otherwise
    • But Kurdistan is a deeply divided society even beyond KDP/PUK divide. You can’t build a state with 10 different militias.
    • Just as intra Arab fights were more powerful than fight with Israel, intra Kurdish fights more important than Kurd vs. Arab



    • 3. People have assumed that the Kurds have learned from history. They have. They built a better place than rest of Iraq after 2003
    • There was some attempt at nation building, investment in education, but internal divides that plagued Kurdish history still same.
    • It's easy to dismiss this as x betrayed y, or cast blame on one of the militia leaders, but this is beyond individual choices



    • 4. Kurds & especially KDP have miserably failed to read DC. It's remarkable how this happened despite contacts with official & unofficial DC
    • Yes, many in the US appreciate the role Kurds have played, but that is not a policy, its feelings.
    • The US is committed by its very nature to existing states in the region. It's a long discussion why this is the case, but its not surprising



    • 5. The time to get a deal was in 2014 when the US was most desperate. Assuming that the US will appreciate anti ISIS role is meaningless
    • I am reminded of a story about Sadat expecting Kissinger to reward him for kicking out Soviet advisers.
    • Kissinger's reaction was why should I reward him for something he did for free. Had he offered it before he would have gotten a deal.



    • 6. Kurdish actions in the disputed territories hardly encouraged non-Kurds to throw their lot with them
    • attempts to control Christian and Yazidi villages, appoint new mayors and leaders reminded everyone of historical examples



    • 7. The "Iraqi government" may think it has won, and it certainly did this round, but the sight of Kurds fleeing tells you all you need
    • The idea of an Iraq was never a serious one & nothing that happened this week strengthens that idea



    • 8. Assyrians that I know are divided. Half are cheering & half crying. I don't blame them. I wouldn't want to be in their shoes.
    • But Assyrians thinking Shia militias are their savior will get bugged by reality soon, just as those who thought Kurdish militias were
    • In both cases, the small minorities have made same mistake as Kurds: failed to cut a deal when the time was right & expect to be rewarded

  16. #336
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    Kurds have basically fallen back to their pre-ISIS 2014 borders. Here's link to article.

  17. #337
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    845

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JWing View Post
    Kurds have basically fallen back to their pre-ISIS 2014 borders. Here's link to article.
    Yes, JWing, I was going to ask that. Is it possible that the Iraqi Security Forces will stop at the pre-2014 lines of control, which placed Kirkuk squarely in federal territory?


  18. #338
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    They just tried to move up to the 2003 border around Irbil leading to heavy fighting with Peshmerga today.

  19. #339
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    Iraq continues to witnesses lowest violence levels in years. Here's a link to the article.

  20. #340
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    Article on fighting along Kirkuk-Irbil border between Iraqi forces and Peshmerga http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/1...101628079.html
    Last edited by JWing; 10-20-2017 at 03:47 PM.

Similar Threads

  1. Iraq and the Arab States on Its Borders
    By Jedburgh in forum Catch-All, OIF
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-18-2009, 07:51 PM
  2. Toward Sustainable Security in Iraq and the Endgame
    By Rob Thornton in forum US Policy, Interest, and Endgame
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 06-30-2008, 12:24 PM
  3. US Senator's Iraq Trip Comments: WSJ 15 June 07
    By TROUFION in forum US Policy, Interest, and Endgame
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-18-2007, 04:26 PM
  4. Victory in Iraq
    By SWJED in forum US Policy, Interest, and Endgame
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 01-03-2007, 01:50 AM
  5. DNI's Fabius Maximus: Iraq and the Future
    By SWJED in forum Catch-All, OIF
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-20-2006, 03:51 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •