Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 81

Thread: China's internal troubles (not the Far West)

  1. #61
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,117

    Default

    That is a shocker. I had to check Kunming's location, it is near the Vietnamese border and a very long way from the known, occasional flash point in Xinjiang Province - where knives have been the preferred weapon in attacks. This maybe a repeat of the jeep attack in Tienanmen Square last year.
    I guess it could be tied to the Uighers, but I think there are quite a few other possibilities. Heck, it could be a Green Peace like movement on steroids. If you Google unrest in Kunming you'll find several articles going back a few years.

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...ce-baha-attack

    Chinese villagers attack factory after reports of polluting

    Environmental protests are on the rise in China, with the public becoming increasingly critical of the fouling of the country's air, soil and waterways during decades of breakneck development. The unrest poses a serious political challenge to the Communist party – anger over the party's response, or lack thereof, to environmental crises has fuelled wider dissatisfaction with corruption and a lack of official accountability.

    Most protests have taken place along China's developed coastal region, reflecting the area's heavy pollution from industry as well as the rising demands of the country's well-off. But the latest unrest was in rural Yunnan, indicating the protest has now spread further inland.

    Yunnan's provincial capital, Kunming, was the site of large protests last year against a planned petroleum refinery that were largely peaceful despite minor scuffles between demonstrators and police.
    Maybe more to the point, is the rail road itself?

    http://www.japantimes.co.jp/life/201.../#.UxJds42Ybug

    Railroading debt into Laos

    The construction of an ambitious rail link between Kunming and Vientiane reflects China's growing economic clout in Southeast Asia

    However, the plan sparked surprisingly vocal protests from Lao villagers whose rural communities would be at threat of being bulldozed away.

    Now, both governments involved have become more determined in their bid to push ahead, and one-party states are not known for being listening for too long to the voices of those opposing bureaucratically ordained projects.
    Then again terrorist attacks are not unheard of in Kunming, in the run up to the Olympics in 2008....

    http://ww4report.com/node/5818

    China: Kunming blasts signal growing unrest in countdown to Olympics

    BEIJING — Two public buses exploded during the Monday morning rush hour in the city of Kunming, killing at least two people and injuring 14 others in what the authorities described as deliberate attacks as China is tightening security nationwide and warning of possible terrorist threats in advance of next month's Olympic Games.
    While it is difficult to cease speculating, I don't claim to have a clue on what actually prompted this attack.

  2. #62
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    12,820

    Default

    I don't dismiss the possibility that the Kunming attack originates locally, but from faraway I'd still go for a link to Xinjiang - which is of course what the (official) Chinese media are indicating.

    There is a thread on the violence in China's Far West, which includes Xinjiang Province:http://council.smallwarsjournal.com/...read.php?t=246

    Normally I'd post this report there, today it is here:
    Police in Northwest China's Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region on Friday shot dead six attackers, while another six died in an explosion, local authorities revealed Saturday.

    Two explosions took place in a beauty salon and a grocery market in Xinhe county, Aksu prefecture at around 6:40 pm Friday. A group of terrorist suspects threw explosives at police, who were making arrests, and police opened fire and gunned down six, the Xinjiang government announced on its official website ts.cn.
    Link:http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/83...l#.UxMeDuN_vk9

    It is noteworthy that I've yet to see any foreign reporting from Kunming, where I'd be surprised foreign reporters are based. In the past far better, non-orchestrated reporting has come from non-Chinese sources, e.g. a visiting BBC World Service reporter in Lhasa, Tibet a few years ago.
    davidbfpo

  3. #63
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,117

    Default

    It is noteworthy that I've yet to see any foreign reporting from Kunming, where I'd be surprised foreign reporters are based. In the past far better, non-orchestrated reporting has come from non-Chinese sources, e.g. a visiting BBC World Service reporter in Lhasa, Tibet a few years ago.
    Not surprisingly there is no additional news coming from China, what did sort of surprise me is the lack of social media reporting from Kunming. In an article I read yesterday it stated China's government effectively removed most SM comments related to the attack. That could have been done for good reasons, for example, to prevent social rage movement against the Uyghurs who may or may not have been the culprits. It may also have been blocked to cover something up.

    As a tactic, the cat is out of the bag. I suspect there will be copy cat attacks in the future globally along these lines. Based on what little I could find on witness accounts it didn't seem the attackers were well versed in the best way to inflict lethal blows with a knife, since more than one witness said they were focused on the striking the head and shoulders. Probably would have been more fatalities if they chose other target areas.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/worl...icle-1.1707232

    Sean Roberts, a cultural anthropologist at George Washington University who has studied Uighurs and China for two decades, said the Kunming violence would be a new kind of attack for ethnic Uighurs — premeditated, well-organized and outside Xinjiang — but still rudimentary in weaponry.

    “If it is true that it was carried out by Uighurs, it’s much different than anything we’ve seen to date,” Roberts said by phone.
    If it was Uyghurs this particular group doesn't seem to be tied to Al-Qaeda (some are, and we captured and killed a few in Afghanistan over the years), because they probably would have access to explosives and other weapons. I wouldn't rule out a martial art cult either.

  4. #64
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    858

    Default

    Kunming apparently has a Uighur slum that has even been the site of some Chinese "hearts and minds" efforts. http://www.scmp.com/news/china/artic...loody-massacre
    This level of dedication to hopeless causes takes Muslims, so i personally dont have any doubt that it was Uighurs.
    The CCP will surely crack down hard, but they are also trying NOT to ignite a major domestic media storm. It doesnt look good for the state to have such problems in the first place. Raises doubts about the mandate of heaven. http://shanghaiist.com/2014/03/03/ne...ront-pages.php
    btw, Pakistani conspiracy theorists are convinced its CIA trying to destabilize China.
    Last edited by omarali50; 03-03-2014 at 07:12 AM.

  5. #65
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hiding from the Dreaded Burrito Gang
    Posts
    3,014

    Default

    Riots in southeastern China after brutal police-inspector killed a man with a hammer in broad daylight. People smashed several police cars and were attacked with tear gas.

    At least 4 Chengguan, the most hated police-inspectors in China, were beaten to death by angry people in Cangnan County of Wenzhou City, Zhejiang Province (located in the industrial southeast), after they killed a man with a hammer. The police-inspectors hit the man with a hammer until he started to vomit blood, because he was trying to take pictures of their violence towards a woman, a street vendor. The man was rushed to hospital, but died on the way.

    Thousands of angry people took to the streets, surrounded the police-inspectors in their van, attacked them with stones, bats, and beat them to death. People were shouting that the police-inspectors be killed on the spot for what they did: “Kill them! Kill them!”
    Read more at http://libertycrier.com/china-violen...BoAjq41imth.99
    A scrimmage in a Border Station
    A canter down some dark defile
    Two thousand pounds of education
    Drops to a ten-rupee jezail


    http://i.imgur.com/IPT1uLH.jpg

  6. #66
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    12,820

    Default

    There are more details on thsi French report, which explains that thsoe attacked were not the regular or state police, but auxiliaries tasked to regulate street trading:
    he Chengguan are notorious in China. According to a report by Human Rights Watch, branches have been set up in more than 650 cities in China. Yet no overarching framework exists to regulate and supervise these parallel police units. As a result, Chengguan have earned a reputation for “brutality and impunity” [Editor's note: in 2009, a guide appeared instructing Chengguan on the arts of ‘beating up’ illegal street traders]. Several victims allege to have bore the brunt of this abuse, including being “punched, kicked” and “thrown from their vehicle into the street”.
    Link:http://observers.france24.com/conten...99-police-unit
    davidbfpo

  7. #67
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    12,820

    Default Will China's new law tackle terror?

    A BBC commentary by Raffaello Pantucci, of RUSI and close observer of China's activity in the far west Xinjiang Province. He asks:
    China's long-discussed counter-terrorism legislation, passed this week, frames the way the country will counter terrorist threats at home and abroad. But it is capable of getting to the root of the problem?

    (He concludes) If China wants to be able to properly and effectively tackle its terrorism problems at home and abroad, it needs to start to think in this way too. It needs to find a way to not only disrupt terror networks but to understand why people are drawn to terror in the first place and how it can address the issue.
    Link:http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-35199712
    davidbfpo

  8. #68
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,117

    Default Trying to Keep Tiananment Alive

    http://www.worldpoliticsreview.com/a...iananmen-alive

    Amid Crackdown, China’s Dissidents Fight to Keep the Spirit of Tiananmen Alive

    In
    the years following the bloodshed in 1989, during which hundreds or even thousands died, a number of surviving political activists struggled to carry on the legacy of nonviolent resistance. Their endeavors were met with merciless government suppression, and a spate of arrests ensued.
    In the spring of 2008, dissidents including the prominent writer Liu Xiaobo drafted Charter 08, a petition calling for human rights, democracy and the end of one-party rule in China, which was initially signed by a coalition of 303 Chinese citizens and posted online in December 2008. The idea of Charter 08, free for anyone to sign, was that its signatories would form a loose group with the common cause of promoting human rights and democracy in China.
    The article describes how this movement was rapidly suppressed. It further illustrates that non-violent resistance has little chance of success when the state maintains control of its security forces and is willing to use oppressive measures against its own people. The West remains relatively silent because of their economic interests.

    The collective suffering of China’s dissidents, known only to a tiny population of the country, is enormous, while the concrete results of their sacrifices are difficult to see.
    All these recent developments bode ill for the future of political opposition in China. As prominent dissident Mo Zhixu wrote, “Grassroots resistance is entering the toughest period. How to cope with the increasingly frozen ‘ice age’ will be a test to all activists.”
    One can continue to hope the Chinese people will rise up and compel change, but I tend to think that is a long shot, not one we should bet on.

  9. #69
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hiding from the Dreaded Burrito Gang
    Posts
    3,014

    Default

    If you're looking to post something about John Oliver on Chinese social media this week, chances are you can't. The British television host been censored on China's biggest social media site, just days after he criticised Chinese President Xi Jinping on his popular US show Last Week Tonight.

    In the show's latest episode, Mr Oliver highlights the political, human rights and economic issues China is currently facing, and delivers some striking criticisms of the Chinese government.
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-44557528
    A scrimmage in a Border Station
    A canter down some dark defile
    Two thousand pounds of education
    Drops to a ten-rupee jezail


    http://i.imgur.com/IPT1uLH.jpg

  10. #70
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hiding from the Dreaded Burrito Gang
    Posts
    3,014

    Default

    BEIJING – On Chinese state television broadcasts, President Xi Jinping is often shown clad in battle fatigues inspecting troops, praising their service, and hailing the People's Liberation Army as key to the country's rising global power.

    But the nationalist drumbeat rings hollow for many retired soldiers who feel left behind, and they have taken to the streets in droves to complain about having to fend for themselves with meager pensions and little support. The unrest poses a delicate political challenge for Xi, who has made his affinity for the military one of the pillars of his folksy image.
    http://www.foxnews.com/world/2018/06...ge-for-xi.html
    A scrimmage in a Border Station
    A canter down some dark defile
    Two thousand pounds of education
    Drops to a ten-rupee jezail


    http://i.imgur.com/IPT1uLH.jpg

  11. #71
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hiding from the Dreaded Burrito Gang
    Posts
    3,014

    Default

    The officers took Liu’s iPhone, hooked it up to a handheld device that looked like a laptop and told him they were “checking his phone for illegal information”.
    Liu’s experience in Urumqi, the Xinjiang capital, is not uncommon in a region that has been wracked by separatist violence and a crackdown by security forces. But such surveillance technologies, tested out in the laboratory of Xinjiang, are now quietly spreading across China. Government procurement documents collected by Reuters and rare insights from officials show the technology Liu encountered in Xinjiang is encroaching into cities like Shanghai and Beijing.
    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-c...-idUSKBN1KZ0R3
    A scrimmage in a Border Station
    A canter down some dark defile
    Two thousand pounds of education
    Drops to a ten-rupee jezail


    http://i.imgur.com/IPT1uLH.jpg

  12. #72
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,117

    Default China's War on Religion

    China's internal ideological warfare seeks to promote so-called correct thinking and love for the f'd up communist party.

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2018/08/22...-end-in-sight/

    China’s Mass Internment Camps Have No Clear End in Sight
    Around 1 million Uighurs have disappeared without trial. Worse may come.

    It is not surprising, then, that the most common officially cited purpose for the internment camps is to purify people’s thoughts, “eliminating extremism” and instilling a love for the party. A recorded announcement leaked this month from Xinjiang’s Communist Party Youth League, designed to calm rampant fears about the re-education camps, explained that camps “treat and cleanse the virus from their brains.” The names used for camps have varied widely, both for the same camp over time and from one camp to the next, but most have included the word “transformation”—for example, “concentrated education transformation center.”
    This is the real Chinese Communist Party, as ugly as it have ever been throughout its long history of repressing its people. Once again we see mass internment, and the party leveraging a youth league to impose its will. It reminds me of Mao's atrocities when he used youth leagues to conduct mass murder of teachers and others who didn't have the correct political views. Today the world can see it happen, but much of the world turns a blind eye to it. Why? To pursue a superficial Chamberlain peace in our time? In hope of gaining economic benefit through trade with China that could be damaged if they demonstrated incorrect thinking? There is a point when the illusion of the communist party as modern political party that shares many common interests with the majority of the advanced countries must end.

    The content of the indoctrination reflects a new emphasis on nationalism throughout the PRC. State media outlets tout the party as China’s savior as they always have, but “China” is now more tightly linked to the culture of the ethnic majority, the Han Chinese. In this view, religions deemed foreign, for example Islam and Christianity, are seen as threats, as is the purportedly Chinese religion of Buddhism when it is practiced by non-Han people such as Tibetans. More than any leader since Mao Zedong, Xi Jinping has promoted the idea that he himself is the embodiment and protector of the Chinese nation. In some camps, inmates are required to replace the common Islamic blessing before meals, bismillah, with thanks to Xi Jinping.
    It isn't just Uighers, but CCP also suppresses other religions such as Tibetan Buddhists and Christians. The state has destroyed numerous churches, and put large pictures of Xi in the churches remaining. I guess he views himself as superior to Jesus Christ, or maybe it is Christianity with CCP socialist traits? Despite this the Pope recently reached out to China to reach some sort of accommodation, but now the Pope has recently awakened from the illusion that accommodations can be made with the CCP at an acceptable cost.

    There is no limit to the CCP's brashness:
    The strangest of these were the coerced line-dancing competitions that spread across the region in 2014. These were supposed to move people away from “extremist” forms of Islam that forbid dance. In other places they pushed children to sign promises not to believe in God and arranged public ceremonies for pledging loyalty to the CCP.
    The following is not wild speculation, there is ample historical evidence that provides credibility for this assertion.

    Local officials have already expressed dehumanizing outlooks on the role of the re-education camps as “eradicating tumors” and “spraying chemicals on the crops to kill the weeds.” Should authorities decide that forced indoctrination has widely failed, much of Xinjiang’s minority population will be framed as irredeemable. And with the state-controlled Global Times claiming, in response to the recent U.N. condemnation of China’s racial policies in Xinjiang, that “all measures can be tried” in the pursuit of China’s “stability,” mass murder and genocide do not look like impossible outcomes.
    When viewed as a whole, hyper-nationalism promoted by the CCP; rapid expansion of its military which it uses to coerce other nations; illegal expansion of its territory; mass internment camps, and a return to youth leagues to enforce "correct thinking, " it is clear that dangerous storm clouds are forming in East Asia. Mao used the youth leagues to kill millions, and then the CCP promoted the same behavior in Cambodia when they supported the Khmer Rouge. The trade war should be the least of our concerns. Communism is a sick form of extremism that is at least as evil as the pseudo-religious ideology that ISIS claims to adhere to.
    Last edited by Bill Moore; 09-22-2018 at 06:16 PM. Reason: Expanding the topic

  13. #73
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,117

    Default China Is Treating Islam Like a Mental Illness

    https://www.theatlantic.com/internat...llness/568525/

    China Is Treating Islam Like a Mental Illness

    Here’s an excerpt from an official Communist Party audio recording, which was transmitted last year to Uighurs via WeChat, a social-media platform, and which was transcribed and translated by Radio Free Asia:

    Members of the public who have been chosen for reeducation have been infected by an ideological illness. They have been infected with religious extremism and violent terrorist ideology, and therefore they must seek treatment from a hospital as an inpatient. … The religious extremist ideology is a type of poisonous medicine, which confuses the mind of the people. … If we do not eradicate religious extremism at its roots, the violent terrorist incidents will grow and spread all over like an incurable malignant tumor.

  14. #74
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,117

    Default

    https://www.ibtimes.co.in/after-isla...-bibles-777252

    After Islam, China cracks down on Christianity; razes churches and confiscates Bibles


    Police officers are known to have visited hundreds of churches in Henan, ordering that they be shut down. Officials also showed up at a church and ordered the removal of paintings of the Last Supper and wall calligraphy of Bible verses

    While China is known to crack down on ethnic minority Muslims, especially in the north-western region of Xinjiang, its latest focus seems to be on the Christians residing in the country. The ruling communist party has raised serious concerns after it recently raided and demolished hundreds of churches in China and also confiscated Bibles and other holy books in the province of Henan.

  15. #75
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,117

    Default

    https://www.hrw.org/world-report/201...hina-and-tibet

    Human Rights Watch Report on China

    When a state becomes a police state it becomes a non-state. It is a political entity that is only sustained by force. A fragile mass that China risks setting ablaze with its abusive policies. Just as concerning is watching the world turn a blind eye to increasingly abusive police state.
    China’s growing global influence means many of its rights violations now have international implications. In April, security officials at the United Nations headquarters in New York City ejected from the premises Dolkun Isa, an ethnic Uyghur rights activist, who was accredited as a nongovernmental organization (NGO) participant to a forum there; no explanation was provided.

    In June, the European Union failed for the first time ever to deliver a statement under a standing agenda item at the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) regarding country situations requiring the council’s attention. This stemmed from Greece blocking the necessary EU consensus for such an intervention due to its unwillingness to criticize human rights violations in China, with which it has substantial trade ties. Chinese officials continued throughout the year to pressure governments around the world to forcibly return allegedly corrupt mainland officials despite a lack of legal protections in China or refugee status determination procedures outside China.
    At the UN Security Council, China joined Russia in February in a double veto of a resolution that would have imposed sanctions related to use of chemical weapons in Syria. In September, the council held closed-door discussions on Burmese military atrocities against Burma’s Rohingya Muslim minority; diplomats said China opposed language recognizing the right of return of the more than 630,000 Rohingya refugees who fled to Bangladesh. While senior UN officials described the military campaign as “ethnic cleansing,” Chinese state media endorsed it as a firm response to “Islamic terrorists.”

  16. #76
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,117

    Default

    https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/02/02/...-rights-abuses

    The Deafening Silence on China's Human Rights Abuses
    Published in Al Jazeera

    It is amazing that cowardly European countries feel obligated to criticize President Trump, and admittedly there is much to criticize, BUT they remain dead silent on much more important issues. At least President Trump has the courage to hold China accountable for unfair trade practices, while the EU seeks to use this opportunity for personal gain.

    The question for democracies or businesses isn't whether to engage: it is how to engage in a principled manner. This means treating China like many governments treat US President Donald Trump when he makes outrageous statements or adopts retrograde policies. Democratic leaders condemn Trump's remarks about "fake news" - but don't condemn China for its censorship or propaganda. They criticise Trump for his hostility towards the UN, but have nothing to say on China's efforts to weaken the institution.

    It is time for new standards to reverse these highly abnormal relationships with China. Forty years into China's "reform era", Beijing has made clear it's not moving on democracy, a free press, or an independent legal system, though courageous people continue to push for these at considerable personal risk. If powerful outside voices mindlessly engage, they not only stab these brave people in the back - they may also find themselves obliged to dance to the tune of a highly repressive government.

  17. #77
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,117

    Default Pompeo Denounces China’s

    https://www.rferl.org/a/china-muslim.../29503526.html

    Pompeo Denounces China’s Treatment Of Uyghur, Christian Minorities

    U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo denounced the "awful abuses" of Muslim Uyghurs detained in Chinese reeducation camps and criticized what he said was a government crackdown on Christians in the country.

    The comments on September 21 come after a recent UN report assailed China’s mass internment of Uyghurs under the pretext of preventing extremism in the western Xinjiang region.

  18. #78
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,117

    Default China and Vatican Reach Breakthrough

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/22/w...version=latest

    China and Vatican Reach Breakthrough on Appointment of Bishops


    Under the breakthrough, Pope Francis recognized the legitimacy of seven bishops appointed by the Chinese government. Because they had not been selected by the Vatican, they had previously been excommunicated.
    But for critics loath to share any of the church’s authority with an authoritarian government, the deal marked a shameful retreat and the setting of a dangerous precedent for future relations with other countries.
    Critics of the deal, including a prominent cardinal in Hong Kong, have argued that it would send a signal that the Vatican did not stand up for those who stood up for it.
    The Pope made a deal with the devil in hopes of expanding the Churches' influence by compromising with the Communist Party of China, even when his own experts in China recommended against it. I suspect the Pope will be greatly disappointed when he finds this deal does more harm than good for the Church.

  19. #79
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,117

    Default Why China fears Myanmar’s Christians

    http://www.atimes.com/article/why-ch...rs-christians/

    Why China fears Myanmar’s Christians
    China-backed United Wa State Party is clamping down on Christian churches, priests and missionaries in a move likely aimed to ferret out suspected US CIA-backed plots and operatives

    The Chinese language statement, obtained and reviewed by Asia Times, pledges to punish any local administration cadres who support missionary activities, bans the construction of new Christian churches, and requires that priests and workers in existing churches must be local not foreign.
    Hardly coincidentally, the announcement comes after John Cao, an ethnic Chinese pastor and permanent US resident of the state of North Carolina, was arrested in China in March for illegally crossing the Sino-Myanmar border. In June, he was sentenced to seven years in prison on immigration-related charges.
    It is clear that China does not want a similar situation with US missionaries emerging in the neighboring Wa Hills. With Myanmar’s broad relations with the West deteriorating over the flight of some 800,000 Muslim Rohingyas into Bangladesh amid reports of abuse, China has turned the crisis into a diplomatic opportunity to regain earlier lost influence.

    From that position of strength, Beijing seems keen to export its model of Christian repression into areas of Myanmar where it has sway and historical reasons to fear Western infiltration.
    China also supports Burma in the UN when it veto's resolutions concerning the mistreatment of the Rohingya by Burmese security forces.

  20. #80
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Hiding from the Dreaded Burrito Gang
    Posts
    3,014

    Default

    Hong Kong (CNN)Fear is sweeping through the campuses of China's elite universities following a nationwide government crackdown aimed at silencing left-wing student activists, who had been campaigning for greater rights and protections for ordinary workers.

    Since August at least nine young Chinese labor advocates have been forcibly detained in major cities across the country, a sharp escalation in Beijing's campaign against student activism on university campuses.
    https://www.cnn.com/2018/11/13/asia/...ntl/index.html
    A scrimmage in a Border Station
    A canter down some dark defile
    Two thousand pounds of education
    Drops to a ten-rupee jezail


    http://i.imgur.com/IPT1uLH.jpg

Similar Threads

  1. China's Far West provinces (inc. Tibet)
    By CPT Holzbach in forum Central Asia
    Replies: 163
    Last Post: 3 Weeks Ago, 07:06 PM
  2. The Gulf of Guinea and West Africa: a new focal point?
    By Beelzebubalicious in forum Africa
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 04-06-2018, 12:34 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •