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Thread: Army Development of Junior Leaders

  1. #1
    Council Member Strategic LT's Avatar
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    Default Army Development of Junior Leaders

    All,

    I have observed this site for about a year now, just recently joined. This is my first post so bear with me. The topic I would like to bring up is the army's current state of developing junior leaders. A PSG in my Battery and I have been discussing what we see as flaws in the system, at great length. We are looking at it from different perspectives, I as the LT and him as the senior NCO, so it has been very enlightening at the similarities that we have drawn from our discussions. We both agree that the army is promoting too many junior leaders who are not ready much too fast. We have SSGs in our battery that were pinned just after they reached 4 years time in service. Many would question whether or not they were ready for the increased responsibility. Some were ready, some are not and it is painfully obvious. Very few of the NCOs with the exception of our SFC's and the 1SG who are at or will be at the 20 year mark shortly, have been to your traditional NCO developmental courses (WLC, BNOC, ANOC). On the officer side I find it absolutely ridiculous that the army is promoting junior officers to CPT at 3 years time in at an alarming promotion rate of 98-99%. No reasonable person can possibly believe that all of these officers are ready for the jobs that come with being a staff CPT or commander. Now don't get me wrong, I believe that there are some fast trackers who are ready for that additional responsibility. There are currently 6 LTs in my unit including myself. It is really scary for me to think of some of my peers being CPTs working in S3 or some day being commanders. Enough ranting

    We both recognize that unfortunately the army will have to increase rates of promotion during war in order to fill critical positions. However we do not believe that standards for promotion need to be compromised, just modified. I think most people who subscribe to this web site believe that in time of war Rank is nothing, talent is everything . This statement is very true. There are PFCs in my unit who you could put SGT stripes on today and would out perform the SSGs and SFCs who lead them. Same goes for some of the LTs in comparison to some CPTs and MAJs for that matter. The conclusion that we have come to is that the army’s structured systems of promotion do not work during war time. We feel that the army through its promotion system does not reward those who have the true talent for leadership and "battlefield smarts".

    Now we get into how to "fix" the system. We feel that for the NCO side where leadership development has failed and can be saved is the promotion point system and more specifically WLC. Right now a soldier can only receive 8 points for going to WLC, but he can get a total of 300 points for going to a board and "Commanders Points". First of all the curriculum for WLC is severely watered down and tagging it with the title "Warrior" is sickening. We feel that revamping the promotion point system by applying a significant amount of points to WLC and revamping the curriculum would be a great start. Below is a brainstorming session we did on how the curriculum should be changed.
    1. WLC should be a requirement to make E5
    2. Open WLC up to PFCs and SPC and be screened by CO level Commanders prior to going
    3. WLC would become an evaluation that would get soldiers promotion points
    4. There would be some permanent party Cadre (Being Cadre for WLC should hold the same weight for senior NCOs as being a Drill SGT or Recruiter). The actual evaluators and other required personnel would come from Post Red Cycle tasking.
    5. Evaluated events
    - APFT
    - Give a PT session
    - Written test on Army Physical Fitness
    - D&C (Hands on and Written exam)
    - Wpns Qual
    - Written exam on BRM & ARM
    - Crew served (Load Fire Clear) M249, M240B, M2, MK19 (M203), and written exam
    - Land NAV (Day, Night, Written Exam)
    - CLS skills (written and hands on) (this would imply that students must be CLS prior to going to WLC)
    - 3 Day field problem conducting basic fire team size missions (clear a room etc.) (soldiers will be provided by red cycle tasking)
    - Developmental counseling and Army Leadership Exams (Leadership exam should include an essay with the topic being a moral dilemma a leader may possibly encounter and how to handle it from a leaders perspective)
    - Promotion and Review Board (Staffed by E7s and above)
    6. Combine current systems board points (150), WLCs (8) and give a max of 158 points for the course.
    7. An overall score of 70% to be a WLC grad
    8. Top 1% receives an automatic promotion to E5
    9. Top 5% receive automatic promotion to CPL

    Some may argue that this caters more towards the infantry, but we argue that these skills are necessary for all soldiers in today’s army. Some may also argue that PFCs and SPCs that could go to WLC may not be ready to SGTs in their branch. That responsibility should lie on the Commander and his NCOs preparing that soldier and training him in his craft prior to being sent to WLC.

    We believe that a course like this could be conducted in less than 3 weeks time and would pay big dividends towards selecting the best young NCOs for the Army. We also have some more ideas for BNOC and ANOC (I will not bore you with them at this point).
    Some may be concerned that this may affect personnel numbers at the NCO ranks, but we all know that the army adjusts it minimum points for promotion all the time. We do feel that going through WLC however, should be a requirement to make E5.

    As for the Officer side. It is very simple. Changing the OER to reflect a clearly defined OML would be a great start. Also enforcing more involvement in junior officer rating from the senior rater’s point of view would be great. We believe that we should follow a system of talent over rank on the officer side as well. We should hold early promotion boards for LTs and CPTs, Rather than having a cookie cutter DOR requirement. Obviously the easy fix for the army is the adjust the DOR requirements in order to fill the ranks, however you run into the dilemma of promoting some too early and holding those who have the true talent back. It is very disheartening to be promoted at the same time as those you feel are not ready. Currently there is no system in place that rewards LTs and Junior CPTs for outstanding performance. An officer cannot distinguish themselves until they get there look at BZ MAJ. The army loses a lot of great young officers to attrition at the four year mark due to disgust with not being able to distinguish themselves. For myself I know that a bonus would not be a good reason to stay in the army. If I knew that I had a true shot at faster promotion due to my merit rather than my DOR I would stay. At this point however I am discouraged with the system and am unsure about my future in the army. I have been given assignments of greater responsibility due to my merit, but I still see guys getting promoted at the same time as me who are true "DUDS" and do not belong. Patriotism, commitment to soldiers, and spirit can be crushed by lack of recognition for your achievements. I'm sure that many of you can relate.

    I look forward to comments. We have discussed publishing something on the subject or maybe just forwarding our ideas to some friends at higher command. This truly is a sore subject for many of those ambitious leaders at our level. Maybe shaking things up a little will help maybe not we'll see what happens to LTC Yingling, a truly respected Redleg and fellow CAV trooper. Brave Rifles!

  2. #2
    Council Member RTK's Avatar
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    Fill out your profile a bit more and perhaps introduce yourself in the Introductions thread. This post may get more headway if you do so.

    As for your question, it's 95% of what it used to be. That's essentially how the promotion system worked 6 or 7 years ago.

    Here's the deal. Joe makes E5 if his PSG and PL send him to the board. If he's not ready, don't send him. So many senior NCOs and officers who complain about how quick Joe makes rank forget they're the one's sending him to the promotion board. If you don't think he's ready, dont put him in front of the CSM in his Class As.
    Example is better than precept.

  3. #3
    Council Member Strategic LT's Avatar
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    RTK,

    Thanks for the advice, I will introduce myself properly shortly. I think that maybe I clouded what my point was with some complaining. I do agree with you that it is the commands responsibility to prepare soldiers for promotion. However I feel that going in front of a board is not the best way to evaluate an individuals leadership ability. If WLC was run like we propose, than a soldier could be more assessed on his actions rather than if he interviews well. We believe that the system has good aspects but it could be much better. I like the idea of promoting soldiers quickly as long as they are ready. A good WLC that they prepare for and execute well should provide set them up for success as an NCO. If WLC was run like we propose it would put a soldiers chances of promotion more in his hands.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RTK View Post
    ...Here's the deal. Joe makes E5 if his PSG and PL send him to the board. If he's not ready, don't send him. So many senior NCOs and officers who complain about how quick Joe makes rank forget they're the one's sending him to the promotion board. If you don't think he's ready, dont put him in front of the CSM in his Class As.
    A big part of the problem is that it is simply easier to send Joe to the board. When a soldier meets minimum TIG/TIS requirements, his leadership has to begin justifying why he's not being sent to the board. If he's received disciplinary counseling, or an Art 15 etc. that is easy enough. However, if he is just a minimal acheiver with nothing covered in previous counseling that substantiates not sending him - the soldier's leadership can find themselves almost forced to send him to the board (dependent upon the personality make up of the higher chain of command). Properly counseling and documenting each individual soldier's strengths and weaknesses, goals and objectives for professional development can be labor intensive for a young SGT/SSG; just as it can be labor intensive for the PSG to make sure all of his NCOs are doing their job in this regard - but it is absolutely necessary.

    Taking the time not only to develop the soldier, but to adequately document his professional development strengths and weaknesses, goals and objectives, is a fundamental responsibility of NCO leaders. However, it tends to be one of those things that falls by the wayside. Pressure to do the right thing needs to be continuous from the NCO leadership - CSM, 1SG, PSG. We are training, developing and mentoring soldiers in a time of war to be future leaders. This is not the time to just be checking the block.

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    These issues need discussion.

    I do find it amazing, however, that my good NCOs and I felt the same way after Vietnam, a hundred years ago. We were saddled with McNamara's 100k as NCOs. We "couldn't" let them leave the Army because we were "too understrength". So we re-enlisted them and promoted them. THEN Thurman's all recruited force started coming in the bottom end and the challenges were HUGE. Highly talented and intelligent privates were consistently outperforming half of their leaders. Ouch.

    Just another challenge to leadership.

  6. #6
    Council Member RTK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jedburgh View Post
    A big part of the problem is that it is simply easier to send Joe to the board. When a soldier meets minimum TIG/TIS requirements, his leadership has to begin justifying why he's not being sent to the board. If he's received disciplinary counseling, or an Art 15 etc. that is easy enough. However, if he is just a minimal acheiver with nothing covered in previous counseling that substantiates not sending him - the soldier's leadership can find themselves almost forced to send him to the board (dependent upon the personality make up of the higher chain of command). Properly counseling and documenting each individual soldier's strengths and weaknesses, goals and objectives for professional development can be labor intensive for a young SGT/SSG; just as it can be labor intensive for the PSG to make sure all of his NCOs are doing their job in this regard - but it is absolutely necessary.

    Taking the time not only to develop the soldier, but to adequately document his professional development strengths and weaknesses, goals and objectives, is a fundamental responsibility of NCO leaders. However, it tends to be one of those things that falls by the wayside. Pressure to do the right thing needs to be continuous from the NCO leadership - CSM, 1SG, PSG. We are training, developing and mentoring soldiers in a time of war to be future leaders. This is not the time to just be checking the block.

    You're right. But if Joe is dumber than a sack of hammers then his NCO should be telling him that at the end of each month. And if it goes in the monthly counselling, along with the other reasons why he won't be going to the board that month, then things work themselves out. Also, few Commanders have figured out how to properly administer the "bar to reenlistment" 4187. It's too easy and can be done for just about anything.
    Example is better than precept.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RTK View Post
    You're right. But if Joe is dumber than a sack of hammers then his NCO should be telling him that at the end of each month. And if it goes in the monthly counselling, along with the other reasons why he won't be going to the board that month, then things work themselves out.
    RTK, I'm with you. That is the converse of professional development - some people just can't be helped or motivated. If your NCO has PVT Joe #### the Ragman who is ####ed up like a soup sandwich in everything that he does, then he has to find some way to put that observation succinctly and quantifiably in writing in his counseling.

    Unfortunately, a lot of outstanding tactical leaders are really bad at doing this, and the other necessary admin work required to expeditiously get rid of the dead weight - or at least ensure that they never make it to positions where they may possess even a smidgen of authority.



    ...in the old days we just shoved'em outside the stockade and let the injuns have their way with'em.

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    "Better no officer than a bad officer."

    The Army personnel system is a giant shell game of numbers. People of lesser talent are going to be promoted along with you because they have to be. As long as the senior leadership demands that units be manned at 100% in the Division/BCT level forces, you are going to have this occur.

    One other thing - the way that the Army rewards a job well done is to give you another hard job. While you might be tearing stuff up as an infantry platoon leader, when you see the spread of 1LT's, you'll start to see the cream seperate from the milk. The speciality platoons are usually led by the best 1LT's in the battalion(did they remove the support platoon leader position from combined arms and light battalions? I think so but can't remember...)

    Also strongly agree with Jedburgh and RTK. Admin work is necessary to get ride of any problem children so know how to use the system.

  9. #9
    Council Member Strategic LT's Avatar
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    All,

    I appreciate your feedback. Believe it or not, my unit has been abnormally successful in weeding out the bad. We have been able to chapter/not promote those who do not deserve with more success than any other unit in the squadron. My real beef here is with the development of leaders. I see no reason why the promotion system for NCOs cannot be changed. Please review our concept for WLC again and let me know what you think. I agree that the command has the biggest responsibility to find and reward those who should be promoted, but there are some commands that do not do this well (we are dealing with a past command who was that bad right now). WLC at this point is not needed to make E5. You can make promotion points by getting college credits, and for all of us ROTC grads you know that just by going to college does not make you a leader.

    Example: we have E6 section chiefs who new as much about their piece as the soldiers did. Question to the past command: How in the hell can you justify promoting a guy who knows next to nothing about his MOS? You have done him, his soldiers, his unit, and the army a disservice for not preparing him for the section chief position that his rank puts him in.

    I feel we can break the cycle by raising the bar, challenging, and instilling a competitive mentality amongst today’s lower enlisted ranks and junior officers for that matter.

    I do like the idea of having more challenging assignments, but it is ridiculous that I get these tough jobs and excel in them while my peers are wasting away doing less difficult jobs and doing them poorly and still make rank at the same pace. Part of this stems from the BS that a LTs records are sealed after he makes CPT, why? If an LT makes a big mistake it should affect his future (a PVTs mistakes affect his future, why are LTs so different)

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    "I do like the idea of having more challenging assignments, but it is ridiculous that I get these tough jobs and excel in them while my peers are wasting away doing less difficult jobs and doing them poorly and still make rank at the same pace."

    Honestly, you need to stop worrying about stuff like this and be the best officer you can be. There's little you can do to affect the career of another peer (other than diming him/her out and that's worse) so focus on what you want out of the military, and where you'd like to see your career progress to. The Army is seriously hurting for LT's and CPT's - they are going to promote almost everyone for the near term - and there's little you can do about it.

  11. #11
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    Default Hey St LT

    Want a huge challenge well outside the box? Volunteer to be an advisor. You're a little young now, but you might get the process rolling.

  12. #12
    Council Member Strategic LT's Avatar
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    Ski,

    thanks for the advice, some times a guy just needs to bitch. It is what it is I guess.

    Old Eagle, thought about that. It is one of the options I have been thinking about.
    Last edited by Strategic LT; 05-20-2007 at 05:07 PM.

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    Everyone needs to vent, but as you get older you recognize that there are some things that require a good fight, and some that don't.

    I recognize that there is probably an issue with quality of JO's, but the demand is outstripping the supply, and the Army isn't going to get rid of them because everyone is getting promoted right now. You'll see seperation and stratification start to occur at the 1LT rank, and the higher up you go, the more stratification you'll see. Not everyone gets to be a Ranger battalion commander, or even a regular line battalion commander. So you need to look at what you want out of your career, how you can make an impact for the better on the leaders below you, and how you think you can change the system one small bit at a time.

  14. #14
    Council Member nichols's Avatar
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    KIM; Long flight to Pendleton, the local gas station had Czech beer.

    I picked up this thread on my Blackberry a couple of days ago, work and family obligations stopped me from responding........

    So now for the first installment.

    I recieved my first good conduct medal as a L/Cpl

    2nd as a CPL

    3rd as a Sgt

    4th as a SSgt

    5th as a SSgt

    6th as a SSgt

    7th as a GySgt

    I picked up my first fireteam as a L/Cpl, my first squad as a L/Cpl.

    First Plt (Sniper ) was as a junior SGT.

    I spent my first 11 and a half years going from Infantry unit to Infantry unit. Right around the 11th year my monitor decided that I needed a "B" billet (Drill Instructor, Recruiting Duty, or Marine Security Guard) to prove that I was a well rounded Marine

    I signed up for Infantry...period....I didn't want anything else.....I wanted deployments.......I didn't want to protect swamp Lejuene or surf's up Pendleton....I wanted to be on the pointy end of the spear.

    I was damn proud of the fact that I was a L/Cpl leading a squad, was better then a Sgt leading the squad? In my heart, I honestly thought so. These Sgts were coming back from B billets, I had more time in the fleet then they did. Ultimately I gave the Corps more bang for the buck.

    What is the answer, does a three year Sgt had the same knowledge as a three year L/Cpl?

    I would say yes. So with this in mind, the only thing the rapid promotions does is put more bucks for less bang, it gives them more money, more stabilty. More of a reason to stay in and commit.

    Ultimately it hangs on the seasoned salts to temper the young leaders.

    This is a no sh!^^er

    "As a Sniper Plt Sgt I required an open squadbay for my Plt. This Plt was the snipers for the Battalion Recon that was attached to our Regiment. Our Regimental S-2 Chief (2 years less time in service then me) came into the squadbay in search of cymlights (sp) for the tactical intel desk. He went into our gearlocker and preceeded to test all of the cymlights that we had. during that work up we were heavy into the ITG non-illum. He came out with the Einstein....hey Sgt Nic, I just saved you a lot of embarassment....every single one of these 18 inch cymlights don't work......"

    The good SSgt just wasted about 80 dollars worth of cymlights (1987).....they were infra-red, without NVGs you couldn't see the illum.

    Very easy for me to say...SSgt those are infra-red. Ultimately I knew what he was looking for, I knew what we had in the gear locker......It's very easy for the junior leader to say the senior guy did it. But we as service members to the United States have an obligation that we use but at the same time we will revert back to.....well, so and so is senior to me so it's not my fault.

    That's BS, let's stop blaming the system, I didn't get promoted soon enough but my mother stopped listening to me crying around the age of 11 or so.

    If the rapidly promoted servicemembers do not get our mentoring even if the system gets them promoted faster and ultimately sooner then us, then we have failed. whether it be a L/Cpl that has just lost his squad to a barracks duty skater or a S-3 Ops guy that sits back and says....back in my day....

    It ain't the rapidly promoted nimbnutt's fault, it is collectively the junior and senior leadership that is criminal if that individual doesn't receive our full mentoring.

    And now for the end state....

    I found myself as a Marine that spent 16 of 21 years overseas. Promotions were slow. The guys with the well rounded career had a house with 10-15 years of payments. Kids in college. I have a new house with 5 years worth of payments (I've been retired for that amount of time) a 13, 5 and 3 year old). I have manged to catch up and pass many of my peers from bootcamp due to my deployment times.

    This all begs the question, what's right and what's wrong?

    The only wrong thing is when we don't mentor.
    Last edited by nichols; 05-21-2007 at 09:42 AM. Reason: ehhhh.....the Czech Beer spelling goggles dohickey

  15. #15
    Council Member RTK's Avatar
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    STRAT LT

    Affect what it is you can affect. The promotion system doesn't fall into that category. Metnor your subordinates (your supply NCO and clerk, training room NCOs, HQ PSG, Medics). You're in a great unit. There isn't a bad How Bat in all of 3ACR.

    Keep your Paladins and carriers up, maintain your supply status, keep your arms room up to date and organized, and you'll be doing your job as a battery XO.

    Good luck.
    Example is better than precept.

  16. #16
    Council Member Strategic LT's Avatar
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    I appreciate all the help from you guys. I talked to the PSG who had the ideas and he wanted me to repost his thoughts. He said he needed a college kid to put into words for him (his words, not mine, haha). This is not quite complete but gives you the idea of where he is coming from. He recently left FT Sill as a DS, retiring soon and wants to send his thoughts up to some higher ups on how things are going at our level. Here it goes again.

    Earlier post:

    Now we get into how to "fix" the system. We feel that for the NCO side where leadership development has failed and can be saved is the promotion point system and more specifically WLC. Right now a soldier can only receive 8 points for going to WLC, but he can get a total of 300 points for going to a board and "Commanders Points". First of all the curriculum for WLC is severely watered down and tagging it with the title "Warrior" is sickening. We feel that revamping the promotion point system by applying a significant amount of points to WLC and revamping the curriculum would be a great start. Below is a brainstorming session we did on how the curriculum should be changed.
    1. WLC should be a requirement to make E5
    2. Open WLC up to PFCs and SPC and be screened by CO level Commanders prior to going
    3. WLC would become an evaluation that would get soldiers promotion points
    4. There would be some permanent party Cadre (Being Cadre for WLC should hold the same weight for senior NCOs as being a Drill SGT or Recruiter). The actual evaluators and other required personnel would come from Post Red Cycle tasking.
    5. Evaluated events
    - APFT
    - Give a PT session
    - Written test on Army Physical Fitness
    - D&C (Hands on and Written exam)
    - Wpns Qual
    - Written exam on BRM & ARM
    - Crew served (Load Fire Clear) M249, M240B, M2, MK19 (M203), and written exam
    - Land NAV (Day, Night, Written Exam)
    - CLS skills (written and hands on) (this would imply that students must be CLS prior to going to WLC)
    - 3 Day field problem conducting basic fire team size missions (clear a room etc.) (soldiers will be provided by red cycle tasking)
    - Developmental counseling and Army Leadership Exams (Leadership exam should include an essay with the topic being a moral dilemma a leader may possibly encounter and how to handle it from a leaders perspective)
    - Promotion and Review Board (Staffed by E7s and above)
    6. Combine current systems board points (150), WLCs (8) and give a max of 158 points for the course.
    7. An overall score of 70% to be a WLC grad
    8. Top 1% receives an automatic promotion to E5
    9. Top 5% receive automatic promotion to CPL

    Some may argue that this caters more towards the infantry, but we argue that these skills are necessary for all soldiers in today’s army. Some may also argue that PFCs and SPCs that could go to WLC may not be ready to SGTs in their branch. That responsibility should lie on the Commander and his NCOs preparing that soldier and training him in his craft prior to being sent to WLC.

    We believe that a course like this could be conducted in less than 3 weeks time and would pay big dividends towards selecting the best young NCOs for the Army. We also have some more ideas for BNOC and ANOC (I will not bore you with them at this point).
    Some may be concerned that this may affect personnel numbers at the NCO ranks, but we all know that the army adjusts it minimum points for promotion all the time. We do feel that going through WLC however, should be a requirement to make E5.

    Thanks for your time.

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    Some of things going on for promotion have been that way for a while (pre-iraq war). Jedburgh (I think) pointed out that paperwork requirements can be a pain not to promote them. This is true. If you opt not to send a soldier to a promotion board for which he is eligible, that soldier has to be counseld in writing as to why not. when I was a company commander I used to enforce this. The BN CSM backed us, but there was some pressure from higher because retention reigned supreme in early 2001. It was no different in the late half of the 1990's. As a company commander, I put the ball in the PL/PSG court. They had to justify to me why they were not going to send a soldier to a promtion board. This was to force them to do their job and be involved/proactive in the training/teaching/mentoring of soldiers. As a commander you get heat from higher for doing this, and the paperwork/ IG complaints/poor attitutde can be a pain. When I took command I had to clean out a back-log of multiple time drug offenders, because the previous command team didn't enforce the standard. I caught hell when my chapter numbers went up, but I did it. Understand that commanders get a lot a pressure, especially with a war on, and no system is perfect. Also understand sometimes you have to give people an opportunity to fail if you want to move ahead. the key is know your people and assess what works. Also understand that their is a rank structure. Kilcullen wrote an excellent thought piece, but it is by no means gospel. Apply it as well as you can within the system you have to operate. Just remember these problems are nothing new, and you have to deal with them.

    It sounds like you are doing well at this. Good Luck and keep it up.

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    Default I agree

    Quote Originally Posted by RTK View Post
    Here's the deal. Joe makes E5 if his PSG and PL send him to the board. If he's not ready, don't send him. So many senior NCOs and officers who complain about how quick Joe makes rank forget they're the one's sending him to the promotion board. If you don't think he's ready, dont put him in front of the CSM in his Class As.
    The problem I encounter is, that our 1SG stresses us to send more soldiers to the promotion board. We are VERY short on NCO's, but have an abundance of eligible E4's. Some of them are ready and it is due to the "negligence" of their leaders they are not sent to the board; however, many of them are not ready. Another issue is, our policy makes it mandatory that every eligible E4 has to attend a soldier of the month board prior to attending the promotion board, but only one soldier per unit is allowed to attend the SOM board. This means that only that soldier can attend the next promotion board - so in our unit only one per month get promoted (if they are even recommended).

  19. #19
    Council Member Ken White's Avatar
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    Default Please tell me you are kidding about this:

    Quote Originally Posted by nalmo2000 View Post
    The problem I encounter is, that our 1SG stresses us to send more soldiers to the promotion board.
    And this:
    Another issue is, our policy makes it mandatory that every eligible E4 has to attend a soldier of the month board prior to attending the promotion board, but only one soldier per unit is allowed to attend the SOM board. This means that only that soldier can attend the next promotion board - so in our unit only one per month get promoted (if they are even recommended).
    Those are both so wrong I'm speechless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nalmo2000 View Post
    The problem I encounter is, that our 1SG stresses us to send more soldiers to the promotion board.
    I hope what he means is to send more of the right Soldiers to the promotion board.

    Quote Originally Posted by nalmo2000 View Post
    We are VERY short on NCO's, but have an abundance of eligible E4's. Some of them are ready and it is due to the "negligence" of their leaders they are not sent to the board; however, many of them are not ready.
    Make the eligible and capable ones corporals as a "try out." I remember back in the day (Christ, now I feel old) when the corporal was the most feared NCO in the company - because he had to prove his leadership every minute he was death on minor infractions and competent in the corrective training it took to eradicate those infractions.

    If they're not ready they shouldn't go to the board. From a commander's perspective, I've always been willing to go shorthanded with the right people than heavy or overmanned with the wrong ones.

    Quote Originally Posted by nalmo2000 View Post
    Another issue is, our policy makes it mandatory that every eligible E4 has to attend a soldier of the month board prior to attending the promotion board, but only one soldier per unit is allowed to attend the SOM board. This means that only that soldier can attend the next promotion board - so in our unit only one per month get promoted (if they are even recommended).
    How is this different than teaching to the test?
    Example is better than precept.

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