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Thread: Case Studies of Pacification in the Philippines

  1. #1
    Council Member sgmgrumpy's Avatar
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    Default Case Studies of Pacification in the Philippines

    The Combat Studies Institute (CSI) is a military history 'think tank' which produces timely and relevant military history research publications and contemporary operational history for the U.S. Army. CSI also conducts battlefield staff rides and provides other types of educational and historical support to Army units and commands upon request. CSI consists of six divisions: the Research & Publications Team, the Staff Ride Team, the Contemporary Operations Studies Team, the Military History Instructional Support Team, the Combined Arms Center Command Historian Office, and the Frontier Army Museum.

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    OP 24: Savage Wars of Peace: Case Studies of Pacification in the Phillippines, 1900-1902
    Last edited by sgmgrumpy; 09-28-2007 at 02:23 PM.

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    OP 24: Savage Wars of Peace: Case Studies of Pacification in the Phillippines, 1900-1902 [/QUOTE]

    I must say the term "pacification" gives me the chills.

    In fairness, the body of the report correctly notes that this was seen as a "war of conquest" by the Filipinos. However, I think the author and/or CSI missed a real opportunity in not subtitling this "Case Studies of Colonial Conquest in the Phillippines" -- especially given that the perception of the US as an outside, neocolonial force is a key element in the moral terrain of the current insurgencies in Iraq and Afghanistan (something that I think needs to be more fully grasped throughout the USG).

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    Default Filipino reaction

    Hi:

    As a Filipino, I am not too comfortable reading this account.

    As I had much earlier said in this forum, exposure to accounts of the Fil-American War has often been the entry point to the radicalization of Filipino college students.

    This is very bad politics. All opposed to the United States could cite this account as yet additional proof that the US is an imperialist country.

    Incidentally, the Philippine revolution is taught in many colleges in my country as the very first nationalist revolution in Asia.And the Fil-American War, the latter part of this revolution, which failed and must be continued.

    The term continued is subject to many interpretations--peaceful ones included.
    Last edited by pinoyme; 10-01-2007 at 04:26 AM. Reason: i missed a clincher

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    Moderator Steve Blair's Avatar
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    I must say the term "pacification" gives me the chills.

    In fairness, the body of the report correctly notes that this was seen as a "war of conquest" by the Filipinos. However, I think the author and/or CSI missed a real opportunity in not subtitling this "Case Studies of Colonial Conquest in the Phillippines" -- especially given that the perception of the US as an outside, neocolonial force is a key element in the moral terrain of the current insurgencies in Iraq and Afghanistan (something that I think needs to be more fully grasped throughout the USG).[/QUOTE]

    Agreed. It could also be seen as the maturation of tactics developed on the plains, since the great majority of the officers engaged in the Philippines learned their trade in the Frontier Army. Interesting parallel...the army we sent to the Philippines (at least in terms of officers and NCOs) was possibly the most combat-experienced we fielded before the current time.
    "On the plains and mountains of the American West, the United States Army had once learned everything there was to learn about hit-and-run tactics and guerrilla warfare."
    T.R. Fehrenbach This Kind of War

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    Default on pacification of the philippines

    Hi:

    In case Americans have forgotten, teach-ins against the Vietnam War involved teach-ins also on the Fil-Amercian War with "Little Brown Brother" as the favored book.

    Insurgency is a war where "politics takes command." The CSI appears to have forgotten this fact.

    And this comes from a poster like me who did have relatives who served with the Philippine Scouts. As a member of the middle class, I also do have have relatives in the US who are doing well there.

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