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Thread: 500 Day Plan - Integration and Collaboration

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    Default 500 Day Plan - Integration and Collaboration

    DNI, 12 Oct 07: United States Intelligence Community 500 Day Plan: Integration and Collaboration
    To promote our vision of a more integrated and collaborative IC, we initiated a deliberate planning process based on the principles of transparency and accountability, bound by a set of deadlines and deliverables. We recently completed the first phase – the 100 Day Plan for Integration and Collaboration – designed to accelerate the execution of the National Intelligence Strategy (NIS) through specific initiatives that build the foundation for transformation. We are now beginning the next phase – the 500 Day Plan for Integration and Collaboration – designed to sustain and accelerate our momentum with an expanded set of initiatives and wider IC participation. The 500 Day Plan focuses on six areas:

    1. Create a Culture of Collaboration
    2. Accelerate Information Sharing
    3. Foster Collection and Analytic Transformation
    4. Build Acquisition Excellence and Technology Leadership
    5. Modernize Business Practices
    6. Clarify and Align DNI’s Authorities

    These six focus areas contain both “core” and “enabling” initiatives – all of which build on the efforts we began under the 100 Day Plan to deepen integration of the Community’s people, processes, and technologies. The “core” initiatives allow senior leadership to focus their attention on the most critical transformational efforts, while the “enabling” initiatives are key to achieving our vision of an integrated Intelligence Enterprise. The IC will work collaboratively to execute the 500 Day Plan through cross-organizational working groups for each initiative, demonstrating the collaboration that is essential for our success.....

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    DNI, 22 Jul 08: Vision 2015: A Globally Networked and Integrated Intelligence Enterprise
    ....By 2015, a globally networked Intelligence Enterprise will be essential to meet the demands for greater forethought and improved strategic agility. The existing agency-centric Intelligence Community must evolve into a true Intelligence Enterprise established on a collaborative foundation of shared services, mission-centric operations, and integrated mission management, all enabled by a smooth flow of people, ideas, and activities across the boundaries of the Intellligence Community agency members. Building such an Enterprise will require the sustained focus of hard-nosed leadership. Services must be shared across the entire spectrum, including information technology, human resources, security, facilities, science and technology, and education and training.....

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    Default Whatever happens to healthy competition?

    It doesn't appear that in his zeal to foster collaboration the DNI has taken much account of the dangers of Group Think. A more collaborative IC with analysts working together across agency lines is a worthy goal. An Intel Enterprise, hierarchically organized, IMO, is not.

    Cheers

    JohnT

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    Council Member Tom Odom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John T. Fishel View Post
    It doesn't appear that in his zeal to foster collaboration the DNI has taken much account of the dangers of Group Think. A more collaborative IC with analysts working together across agency lines is a worthy goal. An Intel Enterprise, hierarchically organized, IMO, is not.

    Cheers

    JohnT
    I have issues with it as well. One of the strengths of the system--it used to be stronger--was that each element brought its own culture to the analytical table. Army intel was much different than AF intel and both differed from DIA "purple" intel, etc. It took a good central managelment hub to control the process, one on paper found in the CIA under the DCI. The problem often emerged that the CIA was acting both as "manager" and as an agenda (culture) driven competitor. The above proposal seems to have at its core a drive to make all the same and that is never good.

    Tom

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    Council Member Ken White's Avatar
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    Default What they said...

    Centralization can be efficient -- it is almost never effective.

    Competing visions provide clarity and keep the system honest, an overarching bureaucracy clouds the view and hides the flaws (see DoD vs. War and Navy for examples).

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    Council Member wm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken White View Post
    Centralization can be efficient -- it is almost never effective.

    Competing visions provide clarity and keep the system honest, an overarching bureaucracy clouds the view and hides the flaws (see DoD vs. War and Navy for examples).
    Not to mention that centralization overrides the system of checks and balances that is the cornerstone of our national governing processes. (Or is that what you just said, Ken?)
    Vir prudens non contra ventum mingit
    The greatest educational dogma is also its greatest fallacy: the belief that what must be learned can necessarily be taught. — Sydney J. Harris

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    Council Member Ken White's Avatar
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    Default Not nearly as

    elegantly or concisely...

    Thanks.

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    DNI Intelligence Community Directive Number 610:
    Competency Directories for the Intelligence Community Workforce
    , 1 Sep 08
    C. PURPOSE. This Directive establishes IC-wide policy for identifying, defining, validating, using, cataloging, and disseminating, as applicable, IC-wide, departmental, independent agency, and component-specifIc competencies; provides a uniform competency nomenclature, including standard labels and definitions for describing IC workforce capabilities; promulgates an initial directory of IC competencies; and requires that qualification, training, career development, performance, promotion, and other standards for managing IC civilian personnel be derived from these competencies and nomenclature.

    D. APPLICABILITY. This Directive applies to the executive departments and independent agencies, which are components of the IC or contain components of the IC as defined by the National Security Act of 1947, as amended, that have IC employees, and to civilian employees of other departments or agencies that may be designated by the President or designated jointly by the DNI and the head of the executive department or agency concerned, as an Ie component, regardless of funding source. This Directive also applies to employees appointed on a time limited basis or certain other employees of an executive department, as designated by the head of that department, to the extent permitted by law. This ICD may be extended to Federal Wage System employees at an IC component's discretion. Further, to the extent permitted by governing law, regulation, and policy, and at the discretion of the Departments of State and Defense, this ICD may also apply to uniformed military and Foreign Service personnel.

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    ODNI OIG, 12 Nov 08: Critical Intelligence Community Management Challenges
    ....This paper identifies the critical leadership and management challenges currently facing the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) as leader of the Intelligence Community (IC) and as head of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI). The DNI’s most critical management challenges are the following:

    1. Strengthening leadership and governance.

    2. Accelerating progress in driving IC information sharing.

    3. Removing impediments to IC collaboration and integration.

    4. Improving financial management and acquisition oversight.

    5. Resolving major legal issues.

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