Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 81

Thread: Latin American Drugs & links

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Council Member jonSlack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    156

    Default Latin American Drugs & links

    Moderator's Note

    Two threads on the impact of the Maras have been merged into this thread(ends).

    Military Review Nov-Dec 06 - Are the Maras Overwhelming Governments in Central America?

    Location, organization, and numbers.
    El Salvador’s National Police (PNC) say there are 36,000 gang members in Honduras, 14,000 in Guatemala, 11,000 in Salvador, 4,500 in Nicaragua, 2,700 in Costa Rica, 1,400 in Panama, and 100 in Belize. That’s nearly 70,000 in the region. In addition to MS-13 and 18, there are Los Cholos (The Half Breeds), Los Nicas (Nicaraguans), and Los Batos Locos (Crazy Boys) in Guatemala; La Mau Mau (derived from the name of rebels in Kenya and a New York gang in the 1950s) and La Maquina (Machine) in El Salvador; La Mau Mau, Los Batos Locos, and Los Rockeros (The Rockers) in Honduras; and the Gerber Boys and Los Charly in Nicaragua.

    The maras are not just a Central American phenomenon; they are transnational. MS-13, for example, reportedly has 20,000 members in the United States, 4,000 members in Canada, and a large presence in Mexico.6 The numbers fluctuate—mara membership being dynamic, and gang membership is difficult to gauge.
    Last edited by davidbfpo; 09-26-2012 at 12:34 PM. Reason: Updated link. Note and merging.

  2. #2
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,098

    Default The Maras: A Menace to the Americas

    Military Review, Jul-Aug 07: The Maras: A Menace to the Americas
    ....Although the mara problem in Central America mainly affects Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras, the region’s other countries should not consider themselves immune: most of the conditions that have given rise to the maras’ appearance in the region’s northern triangle are also present in Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama. Sooner rather than later, these countries will experience similar problems. The mara threat is a serious one. Not controlling it increases risks to the social and democratic stability of the region and has consequences for Mexico and the United States, our neighbors to the north....
    Last edited by Jedburgh; 05-18-2010 at 04:12 PM. Reason: Updated link.

  3. #3
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,098

    Default

    ...just for some additional background material on the subject, here are some decent gang assessments published by USAID last year:
    Rising crime is threatening democratic development and slowing economic growth across Central America and Mexico. Gang activity has transcended the borders of Central America, Mexico, and the United States and evolved into a transnational concern that demands a coordinated, multi-national response to effectively combat increasingly sophisticated criminal gang networks.

    Recognizing that gang activity is a complex, multi-faceted and transnational phenomenon, the USAID Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean Office of Regional Sustainable Development (LAC/RSD) initiated the Central America and Mexico Gang Assessment in 2005 to study the phenomenon and propose solutions in five countries—El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, and Nicaragua.
    Central America and Mexico Gang Assessment - Full Report April 2006

  4. #4
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,098

    Default

    Reuters, 18 Jul 07: U.S. Offers Funds to Fight Central America Gangs
    The United States pledged $4 million on Wednesday to help Central American governments draft a regional security strategy to fight violent youth street gangs and drug trafficking.

    Thomas Shannon, U.S. assistant secretary of state for western hemisphere affairs, made the cash pledge while in Guatemala to sign an agreement with the Central American Integration System (SICA) to improve intelligence sharing and policing.....
    DoS, 18 Jul 07: Combating Criminal Gangs from Central America and Mexico
    Assistant Secretary for Western Hemisphere Affairs Thomas A. Shannon, Jr. today announced the Strategy to Combat Criminal Gangs from Central America and Mexico. Under this comprehensive strategy, the United States will work with partner countries to combat transnational and other gangs that commit crimes in Central America, Mexico, and the United States through both prevention and enforcement. It will help prevent youth from entering gangs and strengthen the fight against gang-related violence and other crimes. This strategy is one component of a larger regional security plan that was discussed by President George W. Bush, Guatemalan President Oscar Berger Perdomo, and Mexican President Felipe Calderon and now is under development by the Central American countries.....
    Last edited by Jedburgh; 05-18-2010 at 04:09 PM. Reason: Updated link.

  5. #5
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,098

    Default

    CRS, 4 Dec 09: Gangs in Central America
    ....Several U.S. agencies have been actively engaged on both the law enforcement and preventive side of dealing with Central American gangs. The National Security Council (NSC) created an inter-agency task force to develop a comprehensive, three year strategy to deal with international gang activity. The strategy, which is now being implemented, states that the U.S. government will pursue coordinated antigang activities through five broad areas: diplomacy, repatriation, law enforcement, capacity enhancement, and prevention.

    In the 110th Congress, immigration legislation has been introduced – H.R. 1645 (Gutierrez), S. 330 (Isakson), and S. 1348 (Reid) – that includes provisions to increase cooperation among U.S., Mexican, and Central American officials in the tracking of gang activity and in the handling of deported gang members. The House passed version of the FY2008 State, Foreign Operations, and Related Agencies Appropriations bill (H.R. 2764; H.Rept. 110-197) would provide $8 million to the State Department to combat criminal youth gangs, an increase of $3 million from the Administration’s request. In Central America, that funding would support a regional anti-gang initiative aimed at prevention, police training, and judicial reform. On July 31, 2007, the House Committee on Foreign Affairs approved H.Res. 564 (Engel) recognizing that violence poses an increasingly serious threat to peace and stability in Central America and supporting expanded cooperation between the United States and Central America to combat crime and violence....
    Last edited by Jedburgh; 05-18-2010 at 04:07 PM. Reason: Updated report link.

  6. #6
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,098

    Default

    SSI, 15 Jan 08: A Contemporary Challenge to State Sovereignty: Gangs and Other Illicit Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs) in Central America, El Salvador, Mexico, Jamaica, and Brazil.
    ....The purposes of this monograph are to (1) introduce the gang phenomenon as a major nonstate player and a serious threat in the global and regional security arenas;( 2) examine the gang phenomenon in Central America in general and in El Salvador, Mexico, Jamaica, and Brazil more specifically; and (3) summarize the key points and lessons and make brief recommendations. These cases demonstrate the analytical commonalities of various types of gang activities as they contribute to the instabilities that lead to the erosion of national security, nation-state sovereignty, the processes of state failure, and the struggle between democratic and criminal values.....
    Complete 67 page paper at the link.

  7. #7
    Council Member Surferbeetle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,111

    Default Guatemala, ¿Estado fallido?

    Ran across an interesting post in El Pais today that discusses some of the ongoing issues within Guatemala and their new president's challenges to include narco-trafficking and the possibility of failing state.

    ¿Es Guatemala la Somalia de América Latina? O, más próximamente, ¿el Haití de Iberoamérica?
    http://www.elpais.com/articulo/inter...pepiint_10/Tes
    Last edited by Surferbeetle; 01-21-2008 at 08:52 PM.
    Sapere Aude

  8. #8
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Hilo, HI
    Posts
    107

    Default

    For your posting this, muy agradecido....Haven't been there in a while, but greatly suspect hyperbole, especially in regard to the extent to which the country is singled out for some generic Central American issues (maras, narcotrafficing)...Enough in the article to elicit a "same old Guatemala..." but the narco angle has brought about one huge difference--the customary "saviours of the nation," the Guatemalan Army, have been bought. Interesting to see who will pull the country's chestnuts out of the fire this time..or whether they'll simply muddle along (more likely, I suspect). Historically, Guatemalan solutions have been far from democratic ones. In the early 70's when Arana was president, the sardonic sense of humor of the Guatemalan people labelled one tactic ascribed to COIN forces "TACA"--same as the acronym of the Salvadorean airline, but in this case, "Transportes Aquaticos Carlos Arana," i.e., the bodies of leftists from the Zacapa/Izabal insurgency floating down the Rio Motagua. After left-right conflict lasting a lot longer than the thirty years the article stipulates (You'd want to take it back at least to Arbenz in the early 50's, if not Arevalo), sad (but not unforseeable) that the long awaited peace degenerated seamlessly into gangsterism.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Last edited by Mike in Hilo; 01-22-2008 at 03:25 AM. Reason: Spelling

  9. #9
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,098

    Default Latin American Drugs

    ICG, 14 Mar 08: Latin American Drugs I: Losing the Fight
    Years of efforts to reduce coca crops in the Andes by aerial spraying and manual eradication and, to a lesser extent, alternative development programs have had little success. UNODC estimated that combined coca cultivation in Bolivia, Colombia and Peru largely remained stable at a high level between 2004 and 2006. ONDCP now admits not only that 2006 may have seen higher production figures than the peak year of 2000 but also that the 2007 flow of cocaine out of South America exceeded previous record highs. Andean cocaine production potential and availability of the drug in the U.S. and European markets has stabilised at a high level.

    Transnational trafficking organisations and cocaine retailers across the Americas and Europe have not been controlled. To the contrary, they have proven capable of adjusting to law enforcement and interdiction by adopting new forms and methods, exploring new routes or reopening old ones and expanding their reach. Despite an increase in seizures worldwide until 2006, there are no convincing indications that availability has been interrupted for any significant length of time in the U.S. and Europe, or the growing Southern Cone markets. Experienced traffickers avoid ostentatious displays of money and power and opt for stealth and corruption in moving hundreds of tons of cocaine annually, relying on street and criminal gangs as retail distributors.

    Political tensions between the U.S. and Venezuela, which has become an important trans-shipment point for Colombian cocaine, U.S. inability to control its 2,000-mile border with Mexico and limited EU disposition to coordinate among member states on more rigorous interdiction efforts are major obstacles to supply reduction. The latest flare-up between Colombia, Venezuela and Ecuador, following Colombia’s raids on a FARC camp in Ecuador, while seemingly resolved by diplomacy, is likely to futher complicate border cooperation. But while more cooperation on and from both sides of the Atlantic is certainly needed to reduce cocaine supply, it will never be sufficient. It is, therefore, at least equally important to focus on preventing coca cultivation in the first place through more ambitious alternative and rural development programs in the source countries.....
    Complete 42 page report at the link.

    Edit to add: Latin American Drugs II: Improving Policy and Reducing Harm
    Last edited by Jedburgh; 03-18-2008 at 12:31 PM.

  10. #10
    Council Member bourbon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    903

    Default Ecuador at Risk: Drugs, Thugs, Guerrillas and the Citizens Revolution

    Ecuador at Risk: Drugs, Thugs, Guerrillas and the Citizens Revolution, by Douglas Farah and Glenn R. Simpson. International Assessment and Strategy Center, January 24th, 2010. (PDF, 77 pages)
    The changing internal situation in Colombia and the expanding influence of the Mexican drug cartels have, over the past three years, helped turn Ecuador into an important and growing center of operation for transnational organized criminal gangs. This poses a significant threat not only to the Ecuadoran state but all of Latin America and the United States.
    Research for this paper was conducted over a four‐month period, including three weeks in Ecuador visiting the border regions and Quito. It is based on interviews with Ecuadoran officials, academics and military personnel, as well as interviews with police and military intelligence officers in Mexico, Colombia and the United States. Farah also interviewed senior deserters of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) who worked in Ecuador for significant periods of time.

  11. #11
    Council Member Dayuhan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Latitude 17° 5' 11N, Longitude 120° 54' 24E, altitude 1499m. Right where I want to be.
    Posts
    3,137

    Default Drug Cartels and US Security

    There’s been a great deal of talk lately about drug cartels and their expansion in Latin America and the US, some even referring to cartel violence as “insurgency”. I’d question that, but there are enough definitions of that much-abused word floating around to include almost anything, so it may be viable for some.

    What seems peculiar to me is the ease with which the discourse frames the problem as a Latin American issue that is spilling over and causing security issues for the United States. It might be more honest if we reversed the picture and recognized that decades of failed drug policy in the US are causing major security issues – in some cases possibly existential security issues – for Latin America. US drug policy has not constrained demand at all and has constrained supply only enough to keep the business obscenely profitable. It is that profitability that drives the cartels and their violent behavior. The problem isn't them. The problem is us.

    US drug policy has been based from the start on the irrational notion that supply creates demand. Whether we’re looking at a single street deal or a hemispheric market, we treat the consumer as a victim and the provider – the “pusher” – as a criminal. This is of course a load of bollocks. Supply doesn’t create demand, demand creates supply. Providers do not “push” users into the drug trade. Consumers “pull” suppliers in by providing a financial incentive so disproportionate to economic conditions that attempts to legislate against it are doomed to fail. If we ignore demand and constrict supply, we force prices so high that inevitably people will take the risks needed to satisfy demand.

    We don’t do this because it makes sense: it doesn’t. We don’t do this because it works: it doesn’t. We do it because in the drug world demand is from light-skinned economically integrated individuals, and supply is from dark-skinned economically marginal individuals. On the wide scale many of the suppliers are not American. We as a society are much more comfortable with the imposition of coercive force on dark-skinned economically marginal individuals, especially when they aren’t American.

    The current approach has failed; this is beyond dispute. We need to recognize that the solution is not in Latin America, but in the US. Instead of trying to legislate against the incentive and force others to do the same, we need to remove the incentive. We need to address demand. I only see two options for doing that, and if anyone else hard another idea, I’d love to hear it.

    The soft option would be to legalize and regulate. The hard option would be to impose and enforce penalties for use and possession that are analogous to those we now impose for trafficking. A combination is possible: soft option for cannabis, hard for opiates, amphetamine, coca and its derivatives.

    Neither of these options are appealing. The politics would be miserable in either case. There would be major challenges and penalties in either case. Even worse, the challenges and penalties would land on us, instead of on our neighbors to the south, where the current approach puts them. On the other hand, since we created the problem, isn’t it up to us to solve it? And aren’t we better equipped to face challenges and deal with penalties? And given that the current policy has categorically failed, isn’t it about time to at least start discussing options?

    Have at it…

  12. #12
    Council Member carl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Denver on occasion
    Posts
    2,460

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dayuhan View Post
    We don’t do this because it makes sense: it doesn’t. We don’t do this because it works: it doesn’t. We do it because in the drug world demand is from light-skinned economically integrated individuals, and supply is from dark-skinned economically marginal individuals. On the wide scale many of the suppliers are not American. We as a society are much more comfortable with the imposition of coercive force on dark-skinned economically marginal individuals, especially when they aren’t American.
    That is a very interesting observation. I wonder if you see the same thing in enforcement within the United States, not so much race based though, but socio-economic class based. You don't often read about a police force taking down the primary retail supplier to Hollywood stars or to the faculty of the University of the Elite.

    If we really want to reform, you are right about there being only two options, hard and soft. I would change the form of the hard option as it applies to use and possession. American culture being what it is penalties similar to those for possession would be uncertain because of all the legal wrangling involved with getting a conviction, especially if middle and upper class people were the targets. The courts would be tied into knots.

    If the hard option penalties for possession were less severe but more certain it would be better. Let us say an officer catches a fine young fellow from a good family with a marijuana cigarette, at 0200 on a Saturday morn. He would transport the fellow to a special court immediately. Upon conviction the fine young fellow would immediately begin serving a 1 week sentence at the county jail, no exceptions for big business deals or babysitters. That would severely complicate the fine young fellows life providing a deterrent but would not be so severe as to hit the sympathy button of the wider community making it more certain.

    That would be the general idea anyway. I don't know the legal in and outs needed to make that kind of thing happen. Maybe it would be impossible, but if it could be done, I think it would work.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dayuhan View Post
    Neither of these options are appealing. The politics would be miserable in either case. There would be major challenges and penalties in either case. Even worse, the challenges and penalties would land on us, instead of on our neighbors to the south, where the current approach puts them.
    This is why it probably won't happen. The current arrangement works great for us. We get to feel smug about our moral stance, our upper classes get their high, the drug warriors have their adventures subsidized and somebody else gets to pay the real price. Politically we want it both ways and that is what we have now.

    The thing that would really force the matter would be if the Mexicans legalized drug importing and exporting and just collected customs duties in and out of their country. That won't happen either but it would be interesting if it did.
    "We fight, get beat, rise, and fight again." Gen. Nathanael Greene

  13. #13
    Council Member Bob's World's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,706

    Default

    Dayuhan. You have picked up and carried my mantra on US illegal drug policies almost to the letter.

    I grew up in rural southern Oregon where there's a great deal of marijuana is grown, and at least one small town that sits strategically on I-5 and at the entrance into millions of acres of rugged national forest land stayed solvent as the timber industry waned by laundering drug proceeds through legitimate businesses.

    As an ODA commander I did a short stint with the Border Patrol Tactical Unit on our SW border; and later in life as a prosecutor served in the Felony Drug Unit in the Multnomah County (Portland, OR) DA's office.

    Supply and Demand; Blame and Responsibility; Ethics and Pragmatism. There are so many conflicting issues that concensus is impossible.

    I've never met a drug pusher, but I've met and known a lot of business men who sell illegal drugs. Our laws and our policies for enforcing those laws are heavily weighted toward punishing those who sell over those who use. Users are seen as victims; yet they are the demand that drives this entire market.

    "Give unto Ceaser that which is Ceaser's" was and is wise advice. The U.S. wants to get into the morality market far too much. To Ceaser I would recommend, "Give unto God that which is God's." Ceaser needs to focus on law and policy. Illegal Drugs is two words. Change that first word to "legal" and one has an entirely new dynamic. That is within Ceaser's lane to do; coupled with new policies to define who can use these legal drugs, and who, by their chosen profession must submit to regular testing and is not eligible as a matter of policy to partake. Make it a personal choice. Use drugs or have an important career, but not both. Fail your piss test, lose your job. Enjoy your drugs.

    Mexico suffers due to the illegality of the drug market. Mexico would have no such problems if it were a legal drug market. As for the U.S.; no need to agonize over punishing users, losing one's job is punishment enough. Buyers will prefer the relative safety and quality control of official sellers; and revenues will fund rehab programs for those who fall victim to their own vices.

    This is one more area where we need to stop demanding that others change to suit us, and look at some hard changes that we need to place upon ourselves in order to solve our problems.
    Robert C. Jones
    Intellectus Supra Scientia
    (Understanding is more important than Knowledge)

    "The modern COIN mindset is when one arrogantly goes to some foreign land and attempts to make those who live there a lesser version of one's self. The FID mindset is when one humbly goes to some foreign land and seeks first to understand, and then to help in some small way for those who live there to be the best version of their own self." Colonel Robert C. Jones, US Army Special Forces (Retired)

  14. #14
    Council Member slapout9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    4,818

    Default

    There was a former LA county DA who said we should legalize it,tax it and treat any violation like a DUI. Might be something to looking at it that way.

  15. #15
    Council Member Dayuhan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Latitude 17° 5' 11N, Longitude 120° 54' 24E, altitude 1499m. Right where I want to be.
    Posts
    3,137

    Default And here I was thinking I was going to start an argument...

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob's World View Post
    Dayuhan. You have picked up and carried my mantra on US illegal drug policies almost to the letter.
    We agree on something? Will wonders never cease? I guess great minds work a like... once every few years at least. I've been preaching this gospel myself for quite a while; I wonder if anyone will listen now that the problem is in the eye a bit more. I'm not betting on it.

    Quote Originally Posted by carl View Post
    I wonder if you see the same thing in enforcement within the United States, not so much race based though, but socio-economic class based.
    I suspect that it's driven more by socio-economic class bias than race bias, though in the end the result is the same, as our prison population shows rather well.

    Quote Originally Posted by carl View Post
    If the hard option penalties for possession were less severe but more certain it would be better. Let us say an officer catches a fine young fellow from a good family with a marijuana cigarette, at 0200 on a Saturday morn. He would transport the fellow to a special court immediately. Upon conviction the fine young fellow would immediately begin serving a 1 week sentence at the county jail, no exceptions for big business deals or babysitters. That would severely complicate the fine young fellows life providing a deterrent but would not be so severe as to hit the sympathy button of the wider community making it more certain.
    Certainty over severity seems an excellent idea to me, though I suspect that the legalities would be complicated, and controversial. I also suspect that punishing people for smoking a joint is pretty much a waste of time and resources... I'd treat marijuana like alcohol and focus effort on the harder drugs.

    Quote Originally Posted by carl View Post
    This is why it probably won't happen. The current arrangement works great for us. We get to feel smug about our moral stance, our upper classes get their high, the drug warriors have their adventures subsidized and somebody else gets to pay the real price. Politically we want it both ways and that is what we have now.
    We also get to blame someone, always something we look for. When Mom and Dad discover that Ashley and Tyler are spending their prodigious allowances on smack, crack, and blow it can all be the fault of the sinister pusher and the evil cartel....
    Last edited by Dayuhan; 01-08-2011 at 03:51 AM.

  16. #16
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    12

    Default Counter Cartel training for Mexico

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...012106325.html
    I really like this idea. I have, for sometime now, been advocating for us to get more involved in training the Mexicans to effectively fight the cartels that are knocking on our door. We cannot just put US troops INTO Mexico to do it and just training leaders to train their soldiers would take years to become effective. This seems like the perfect answer to that dilemma, thoughts?

  17. #17
    Council Member Dayuhan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Latitude 17° 5' 11N, Longitude 120° 54' 24E, altitude 1499m. Right where I want to be.
    Posts
    3,137

    Default

    I think it's absolutely the wrong answer to this dilemma, and at best a stopgap measure with a potential bit of temporary utility.

    The answer to the dilemma is for the US to address and change its failed drug policies, and to address the demand side of the drug equation, which are what brought the cartels into being in the first place.

    It's completely backwards to say that Mexico's inability to control the cartels is threatening US security. America's inability to control its drug problem is threatening Mexico's security, and the Mexicans have every right to be pissed off at the Americans over it.
    Last edited by Dayuhan; 01-23-2011 at 01:01 AM.

  18. #18
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Brainwashing the American public to not consume drugs!?

    How would you propose to change our drug policy.

  19. #19
    Council Member Dayuhan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Latitude 17° 5' 11N, Longitude 120° 54' 24E, altitude 1499m. Right where I want to be.
    Posts
    3,137

    Default

    Posted on the subject here, no need to repeat...

    http://council.smallwarsjournal.com/...ad.php?t=12192

  20. #20
    Council Member IntelTrooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    RC-S, Afghanistan
    Posts
    302

    Default

    Government brainwashing won't do it. We have, in this country, a problem that is literally increasing exponentially from generation to generation. Part of the problem is genetic but the majority of the problem is familial relationship patterns which result in increased demand for drugs.

    We won't get the drug problem under control because political and religious types won't hear the truth, and even if they do they certainly won't enact measures to reverse the trend.

    If you took a survey of the family of origin situations of drug addicts you would find similarities as far as physical and sexual abuse, absence of parents, alcoholism, and environments that don't allow them to develop healthy methods of coping with stress and emotionally taxing situations (these are the same factors, incidentally, which are contributing to our increasing suicide rates in the military, though no military leaders want to acknowledge this either).

    Because these factors tend to appear with particular frequency in certain racial and socio-economic groups, we don't hear about them much because we're more afraid of offending someone than getting to an actual solution.

    The drug problem is not a law enforcement or military problem -- it is a failure of our society to look out for each other, but we want to punish people more than help them, so we perpetuate the cycle (and, I would say, profoundly exacerbate it).

    To get the situation under control I would say we need mandatory birth control and counseling/therapy for a significant portion of the population who have been subjected to these situations. It is literally a disease that is being passed genetically, and because the people who carry it are reproducing themselves at a rate probably higher than the rest of the population it will require invasive measures, or it will simply spin out of control.
    Last edited by IntelTrooper; 01-23-2011 at 03:37 AM.
    "The status quo is not sustainable. All of DoD needs to be placed in a large bag and thoroughly shaken. Bureaucracy and micromanagement kill."
    -- Ken White


    "With a plan this complex, nothing can go wrong." -- Schmedlap

    "We are unlikely to usefully replicate the insights those unencumbered by a military staff college education might actually have." -- William F. Owen

Similar Threads

  1. Urban / City Warfare (merged thread)
    By DDilegge in forum Futurists & Theorists
    Replies: 199
    Last Post: 03-23-2019, 09:11 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-11-2009, 12:52 PM
  3. U.S. Will Train Latin American Militaries
    By SWJED in forum FID & Working With Indigenous Forces
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-11-2006, 05:21 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •