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Thread: Small War in Mexico: 2002-2015 (closed)

  1. #241
    Council Member carl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapout9 View Post
    It is most definitely a War.....and we are losing and our fearless leaders (in D.C.) are completely clueless about it....or just don't care
    What more can we do? We are already helping the Mexicans, quietly, with some things in Mexico. The border, is a bit disturbing but historically, bandits or Indian raiders or smugglers are nothing new on the border and almost all the violence is still south. The Fox story quotes the Texas DPS as saying contraband coming north is in smaller loads indicating law enforcement on this side of the border is do a good job pressuring the smugglers. What else can we do?
    "We fight, get beat, rise, and fight again." Gen. Nathanael Greene

  2. #242
    Council Member slapout9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carl View Post
    What more can we do? We are already helping the Mexicans, quietly, with some things in Mexico. The border, is a bit disturbing but historically, bandits or Indian raiders or smugglers are nothing new on the border and almost all the violence is still south. The Fox story quotes the Texas DPS as saying contraband coming north is in smaller loads indicating law enforcement on this side of the border is do a good job pressuring the smugglers. What else can we do?
    Collapse some of the main drivers of the situation such as we really need to look at some type of rational legalization of marijuana and we need some type of humane immigration control, not necessarily citizenship but good documentation of who is here and why they are here.

  3. #243
    Council Member carl's Avatar
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    I wholeheartedly concur with both of those and with idea of getting at the "drivers".
    "We fight, get beat, rise, and fight again." Gen. Nathanael Greene

  4. #244
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
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    Hundreds of people have fled a small Mexican town on the U.S. border, the latest incident in which the country's war against drug traffickers is driving refugees from the violence.

    Around 300 people have abandoned the town of Ciudad Mier, local authorities from a nearby town said Thursday, fleeing violence from drug traffickers who were threatening residents.

    Ciudad Mier, a stone's throw from the border of Texas, is one of numerous cities on borderlands believed to be in dispute by two rival drug cartels. More than 60 people have been killed in the town of about 6,000 people this year.
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...334970362.html

    *
    In Mexico, Tijuana's police chief is known as an enforcer: In his two years as chief, Lt. Col. Julian Leyzaola has purged his force of corrupt cops and returned a sense of safety to the city.

    But human rights groups say he has gone too far — even using torture — in his battle against some of the most powerful criminal syndicates in the world.
    http://www.npr.org/2010/11/19/131458...uption-cartels
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  5. #245
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
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    ..drug violence has painted Monterrey with the look and feel of the gritty border 100 miles (160 kilometers) to the north as two former allies, the Gulf and Zetas gangs, fight for control of Mexico's third-largest - and wealthiest - city.

    The deterioration happened nearly overnight, laying bare issues that plague the entire country: a lack of credible policing and the Mexican habit of looking the other way at the drug trade as long as it was orderly and peaceful.

    *

    The Mexican government announced Wednesday it is ordering a significant boost in military troops and federal police in the northeastern border state of Tamaulipas and neighboring Nuevo Leon, home to Monterrey.

    The two states are under the heaviest attack since the cartel split earlier this year. Both have witnessed increasingly horrific violence spilling into daily life and claiming civilians, while politicians and journalists are either silenced or killed.
    http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories...TAM&SECTION=US
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  6. #246
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
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    About 150 miles north of Guatemala City, deep in the jungle, is a military base where Guatemalan Special Forces are being trained secretly by U.S. Green Berets.

    The U.S. officers say the Guatemalan troops are committed to the task of defeating the Mexican drug cartels and are training tirelessly.

    *

    Police in the suburbs of Guatemala City say many farmers who live along the Mexico-Guatemala border have relinquished their land to Los Zetas, a notorious Mexican cartel known for its brutal tactics. Others have abandoned the border region anticipating that their property would be confiscated and their families would soon be targets.
    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2010/12/14...#ixzz186syvJqM
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  7. #247
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
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    COBAN, Guatemala (AP) - The Guatemalan military declared a state of siege Sunday in a northern province that authorities say has been overtaken by Mexican drug traffickers.

    The government initiated the monthlong measure in the Alta Verapaz province to reclaim cities that have been taken over by the Zetas drug gang

    http://www.elpasotimes.com/juarez/ci...176?source=pkg
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  8. #248
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
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    GUATEMALA CITY – Men claiming to belong to the Zetas drug gang forced radio stations to broadcast a threat of war in a northern Guatemalan province where the government declared a state of siege last week, authorities said Tuesday.

    The men arrived at three radio stations in the northern city of Coban and threatened to burn the premises down and kill journalists and their families if the message was not broadcast, Interior Ministry spokesman Nery Morales said.

    The message, which the radio broadcasters read out Monday, threatened violence if Guatemalan President Alvaro Colom does not fulfill unspecified promises. It said "war will start in this country, in shopping malls, schools and police stations."
    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2010/12...#ixzz19WA5OwgP
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  9. #249
    Council Member slapout9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdamG View Post
    Good Guerrilla Warfare is very effective

  10. #250
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
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    Mexican government forces are outgunned in their fight against drug-trafficking organizations, facing an adversary that in some ways is like an insurgency, prompting the country to look for help not just from the United States, but from a country to the south, Colombia.

    Colombian forces have been battling a big guerrilla army with increasing success. It turns out that Colombia's expertise in counterinsurgency may help Mexican forces in their fight against the cartels.
    http://www.npr.org/2011/01/02/132492...as-war-on-farc

    Mexico's drug war continues to claim victims at an astounding rate, and there are no signs that the violence will ease any time soon. In 2010 alone, the death toll from the violence was more than double the number of U.S. soldiers killed in Afghanistan and Iraq during the past seven years. Liane talks to NPR's Jason Beaubien about whether the situation might improve in 2011.
    http://www.npr.org/2011/01/02/132583...ills-Into-2011
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  11. #251
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    Default Criminal Insurgencies in Mexico: Web and Social Media Resources

    Criminal Insurgencies in Mexico: Web and Social Media Resources

    Entry Excerpt:

    Criminal Insurgencies in Mexico:
    Web and Social Media Resources
    by Dr. Robert J. Bunker and Lt. John P. Sullivan

    Download The Full Article: Criminal Insurgencies in Mexico: Web and Social Media Resources

    The authors of this piece, individually, collectively, and in cooperation with other scholars and analysts, have written about the criminal insurgencies in Mexico and various themes related to them in Small Wars Journal and in many other publications for some years now. The Small Wars publications alone include “State of Siege: Mexico’s Criminal Insurgency,” “Plazas for Profit: Mexico’s Criminal Insurgency,” “Cartel v. Cartel: Mexico’s Criminal Insurgency,” “The Spiritual Significance of ¿Plata O Plomo?,” “Explosive Escalation?: Reflections on the Car Bombing in Ciudad Juarez,” and “The U.S. Strategic Imperative Must Shift From Iraq/Afghanistan to Mexico/The Americas and the Stabilization of Europe.” Certain truths have become evident from such writings and the raging conflicts that they describe and analyze.

    First, the criminal insurgencies in Mexico have been increasing in intensity since the formal declaration of war—penned with the initial deployment of Army units into Michoacán and Ciudad Juárez against the insurgent gangs and cartels—by the Calderón administration in December 2006. Over 30,000 deaths in Mexico, just over ten-times the death toll from the 9-11 attacks, have now resulted from these conflicts with 2010 surpassing the earlier end of year tallies with almost 13,000 total killings. While most of these deaths have been attributed to cartel on cartel violence, an increasing proportion of them include law enforcement officers (albeit many of them on cartel payroll), military and governmental personnel, journalists, and innocent civilians. While some successes have been made against the Mexican cartels, via the capture and targeted killings of some of the capos and ensuing organizational fragmentation, the conflicts between these criminal groups and the Mexican state, and even for neighboring countries such as Guatemala, is overall not currently going well for these besieged sovereign nations. Recent headlines like those stating “Mexico army no match for drug cartels” and “Drug gang suspects threaten ‘war’ in Guatemala” are becoming all too common. Further, it is currently estimated that in Mexico about 98% of all crimes are never solved—providing an air of impunity to cartel and gang hit men and foot soldiers, many of whom take great delight in engaging in the torture and beheading of their victims.

    Second, Small Wars Journal readers, especially those in the United States, need to appreciate the strategic significance of what is taking place in Mexico, Central America and in other Latin American countries, and increasingly over the border into the United States itself. War and insurgency in Iraq, Afghanistan, Western Pakistan, and in other distant OCONUS locales ultimately represent much lower stakes than the high levels of strife, establishment of criminal enclaves and depopulated cartel security zones, and rise of narco-cities—such as Nuevo Laredo under the Cártel del Golfo (CDG)—now taking place on our Southern border and extending down through Central America. A chilling example of the criminal insurgencies being waged is the fate of the contested city of Ciudad Juárez—over 230,000 people have fled, primarily the business elite and skilled workers; 6,000 businesses have closed, and tens-of-thousands of homes now stand vacant or have been abandoned. While Ciudad Juárez may represent an extreme form of urban implosion, this pattern is being repeated in numerous towns throughout Mexico with many such towns and small villages in Northern Mexico now partially or fully abandoned and, even in some instances, burned to the ground. To add insult to injury, some of the cartel conflict now taking place in the urban plazas and rural transit routes is being described in an almost post-apocalyptic manner with make shift armored pickups and even a ten-wheeled armored dump truck able to carry ten enforcers and with the combatants engaging in firefights with high caliber and anti-tank weapons. It must now be accepted that the cartels and gangs of Mexico, Central America, and increasingly South America have morphed from being solely narcotics based trafficking entities to being complex, diversified criminal organizations. These criminal enterprises are increasingly politicized and armed with military grade weaponry, backed up with the training and esprit de corps necessary for them to make war on sovereign states. This asymmetric war now being waged is derived from their unique and evolving criminal insurgency tenets using not only the bribe and the gun but also, information operations, and increasingly, deviant forms of spirituality in order to further dark and morally bankrupt agendas.

    Download The Full Article: Criminal Insurgencies in Mexico: Web and Social Media Resources

    Dr. Robert J. Bunker holds degrees in political science, government, behavioral science, social
    science, anthropology-geography, and history. Past associations have included Futurist in Residence, FBI Academy, Quantico, VA; Counter-OPFOR Program Consultant (Staff Member), National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center—West, El Segundo, CA; Fellow, Institute of Law Warfare, Association of the US Army, Arlington, VA; Lecturer-Adjunct Professor, National Security Studies Program, California State University San Bernardino, San Bernardino, CA; instructor, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA; and founding member, Los Angeles County Terrorism Early Warning Group. Dr. Bunker has over 200 publications including short essays, articles, chapters, papers and book length documents. These include Non-State Threats and Future Wars (editor); Networks, Terrorism and Global Insurgency (editor); Criminal-States and Criminal-Soldiers (editor); Narcos Over the Border (editor). He can be reached at bunker@usc.edu.


    John P. Sullivan is a regular contributor to Small Wars Journal. He is a career police officer and currently serves as a lieutenant with the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department. He is also a Senior Research Fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies on Terrorism (CAST). He is co-editor of Countering Terrorism and WMD: Creating a Global Counter-Terrorism Network (Routledge, 2006) and Global Biosecurity: Threats and Responses (Routledge, 2010). His current research focus is the impact of transnational organized crime on sovereignty, intelligence, terrorism, and criminal insurgencies.



    --------
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    This forum is a feed only and is closed to user comments.

  12. #252
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
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    FORT QUITMAN, Texas -- At least one Mexican gunman fired a high-powered rifle across the border at four U.S. road workers Thursday in an isolated ghost town east of Fort Hancock, Hudspeth County sheriff's officials said. The bullets did not injure the four men.

    Mike Doyle, chief deputy of the Hudspeth County Sheriff's Office, said a rancher spotted a white pickup fleeing the area on the Mexican side at 10:30 a.m. -- the time the shots were fired.
    http://www.elpasotimes.com/ci_170871...ce=most_viewed

    One of the most violent and notorious drug gangs in Mexico has reportedly circulated a letter announcing a one month ceasefire. In the letter, allegedly signed by the La Familia drug cartel, the gang said it will stop all criminal activity in the western state of Michoacan for the month of January to prove that its members are not responsible for all the violence the media has attributed to them.
    Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/worl...#ixzz1B1nFrhRm
    Last edited by AdamG; 01-14-2011 at 04:30 PM.
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  13. #253
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    Default Mexnarcos

    Grim reading and maybe nothing new for SWC readers, except IMHO it has appeared on a UK/European website.

    Opens with:
    In the end, this is a war about fundamental human justice in almost every conceivable sense of that phrase. The solution, if there is one, will require an international response.
    Later this is more telling:
    ...the drug trade provides a path out of poverty and access to a life-style unobtainable, indeed not even thinkable, in the world of so-called legitimate activity. Here lies the challenge not just to Mexico, but to a wider world.
    The very last paragraph is well odd, not the one above and I do not follow the author's argument. Revolution via narcotics?

    Link:http://www.opendemocracy.net/jeremy-fox/mexnarcos
    davidbfpo

  14. #254
    Council Member slapout9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidbfpo View Post

    The very last paragraph is well odd, not the one above and I do not follow the author's argument. Revolution via narcotics?
    David, what is it you find so confusing?

  15. #255
    Council Member carl's Avatar
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    David:

    The author of that piece seems to equate criminality with a search for social justice. The criminals I met were just out for themselves, though they were always willing to put one over on the gullible by playing the social justice card.

    Somebody once told me the Mexicans will take it and take it and take it, then the next second they go completely crazy and turn the world upside down. I wonder if that will happen.
    "We fight, get beat, rise, and fight again." Gen. Nathanael Greene

  16. #256
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
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    Default Revolution via narcotics?

    Slap & Carl,

    The full last paragraph I had reservations over is:
    In the end, this is a war about fundamental human justice in almost every conceivable sense of that phrase. The solution, if there is one, will require an international response; solidarity with Mexico as the country struggles to find a path to peace, and maybe something more - recognition that neither peace nor justice can be achieved while so many millions of our fellow human beings lack the wherewithal to live a dignified life. Four hundred and fifty years ago, in 1562, the great French essayist Montaigne heard the message in Paris from the lips some of the first South Americans to cross the Atlantic.

    ....(the visitors) noted that though there were some men among us of great wealth, many were ragged, half-starved beggars; and they found it strange that people who suffered such injustice did not rise up and take the rich by the throat or set fire to their houses.

    That may well be what the cartels are about.
    My understanding of revolutions is far from a population assailed by crime and violence that allows or enables criminal gangs to violently overthrow the state. Cartels with a socio-economic agenda I think not.
    davidbfpo

  17. #257
    Council Member slapout9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidbfpo View Post
    My understanding of revolutions is far from a population assailed by crime and violence that allows or enables criminal gangs to violently overthrow the state. Cartels with a socio-economic agenda I think not.
    I agree with that. The part that I thought was upsetting was the religious overtone of some of the comments in the article. When religion combines with criminals you can end up with a very big problem that amounts to people using crime/criminal methods to fight for their god given rights or to correct an injustice... now that can certainly turn into a revolution.

  18. #258
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
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    EXCLUSIVE: A book celebrating suicide bombers has been found in the Arizona desert just north of the U.S.- Mexican border, authorities tell Fox News.
    The book, "In Memory of Our Martyrs," was spotted Tuesday by a U.S. Border Patrol agent out of the Casa Grande substation who was patrolling a route known for smuggling illegal immigrants and drugs.
    Published in Iran, it consists of short biographies of Islamic suicide bombers and other Islamic militants who died carrying out attacks.

    *
    "At this time, DHS does not have any credible information on terrorist groups operating along the Southwest border," a Department of Homeland Security official said in a statement. "We work closely with our partners in the law enforcement and intelligence communities and as a matter of due diligence and law enforcement best practice, report anything found, no matter how significant or insignificant it may seem."
    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/01/27...#ixzz1CIBiHvlQ
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  19. #259
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
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    U.S. border guards got a surprise when they searched a Mexican BMW and found a hardline Muslim cleric - banned from France and Canada - curled up in the boot.
    Said Jaziri, who called for the death of a Danish cartoonist that drew pictures of the prophet Mohammed, was being smuggled into California when he was arrested, along with his driver Kenneth Robert Lawler.
    The 43-year-old was deported from Canada to his homeland Tunisia in 2007 after it emerged he had lied on his refugee application about having served jail time in France.
    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz1CLLXRGJ8
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  20. #260
    Council Member AdamG's Avatar
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2YLby2mxzp4

    Drug smugglers trying to get drugs across the U.S.-Mexico border are getting old-school: they're trying a catapult*.
    http://www.tucsonsentinel.com/local/...drug_trebuchet

    * Looks technically more like a Trebuchet.

    Full disclosure : I made an inner-tube powered catapult from Erector Set parts in Boy Scouts.

    You may now post your Monty Python French Knight quotes below.
    Last edited by AdamG; 01-29-2011 at 08:36 PM.
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