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Thread: More Piracy Near Somalia

  1. #201
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    A UK radio station had an interesting documentary on the Clipper project ship that was recently released after it's hijacking off the coast of Somalia last year http://piracy-watch.blogspot.com/200...cumentary.html, unusual for the owner to talk of ransom payments. They usually keep silent about this in case the money ever made it's way into the hands of terrorists, as this is illegal in most countries no matter how it comes about.

  2. #202
    Council Member bourbon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goesh View Post
    - love the money drop, very high techy, goes so well with multicultural relativism, they could have at least put a smiley face or two on the canister, happy pirates don't torture their victims before shooting them in the head ( cynicism mandated IMO)
    What goes on inside Somalia may well make Torquemada blush for all I know; but the negligible reports of instances where torture employed by the pirates is notable. A few articles I’ve seen the pirates take offense to notion that they torture, or are terrorists – strictly business for these guys.

  3. #203
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    Default General rule ....

    for those who take hostages for ransom (whether for $ or hostage exchange) is not to damage the merchandise (at least not too much ).

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    Quote Originally Posted by bourbon View Post
    What goes on inside Somalia may well make Torquemada blush for all I know; but the negligible reports of instances where torture employed by the pirates is notable. A few articles I’ve seen the pirates take offense to notion that they torture, or are terrorists – strictly business for these guys.
    That is true - there was a a recent series of NPR about a pirate negotiator. See this and this. It's worth it to listen to the stories, especially the first one.

  5. #205
    Council Member Uboat509's Avatar
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    Based on what I have read and heard, this habbit of being nice to their hostages until the ransom is paid is largely a Somali phenomenon. Reports from other areas of heavy pirate activity, seem to indicate that pirates in these areas are far less kind to prisoners. I supose this could be at least partialy due to the fact that the organizations running vessals through those waters are less willing/able to pay ransoms for crews. In that case the crew would be, at best, witnesses and at worst and active impediment to the pirate operations.

    SFC W

  6. #206
    Council Member bourbon's Avatar
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    Also if the pirate’s motivation is kidnap & ransom or plunder based. I have not read of any instances where the Somali pirates specifically attack to steal the cargo or ship; whereas the plunder motive is the case in other regions. There were cases of ships being hijacked in the Strait of Malacca where the pirates would plunder the load of industrial metals, repaint/rename the ship, and execute the crew.

  7. #207
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
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    Default Belgain ship released plus

    An update by the BBC: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/8122858.stm
    Plus a wider review and graphics.

    davidbfpo

  8. #208
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    Default [USIP] Counting the Costs of Somali Piracy

    From the US Institute of Peace:

    Counting the Costs of Somali Piracy

    By Raymond Gilpin

    The upsurge in attacks by Somali pirates between 2005 and mid-2009 reflects decades of political unrest, maritime lawlessness and severe economic decline. Piracy has dire implications for economic development and political stability in Somalia, with economic prospects constrained, business confidence compromised and human security worsening. It could also have a destabilizing effect on global trade and security unless immediate steps are taken to craft a coordinated strategy to address the complex factors that trigger and sustain crime and impunity on the high seas. However, poorly designed and implemented strategies could inadvertently strengthen the hand of extremists in and around Somalia. The Somali authorities and their international partners should plan for a sustained application of "smart power" by all stakeholders. This paper offers practical strategies to mitigate the rising costs of Somali piracy and lay the foundation for lasting peace.
    They mostly come at night. Mostly.


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    CNA, 16 Jul 09: China’s Participation in Anti-Piracy Operations off the Horn of Africa: Drivers and Implications
    ....On March 20, 2009, CNA China Studies hosted a half-day conference to discuss China’s anti-piracy activities. Bringing together U.S. officials, analysts, and active-duty military personnel, the conference examined the reasons that piracy has become a problem in the Gulf of Aden/HoA region; the drivers for China’s unprecedented naval participation in international anti-piracy efforts; the implications that this participation has for China’s navy; and the potential implications that it has for the United States.

    This report first outlines four major themes discussed throughout the conference. It then turns to a more detailed discussion of each of the conference’s three panels.....

  10. #210
    Council Member tpjkevin's Avatar
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    Default Singapore to take command of CTF 151 from Jan 2010

    It will be a good learning experience, and I hope my nation is up to the task.

    S'porean to lead flotilla
    By Jermyn Chow
    July 31, 2009


    The Singaporean naval officer, who has not yet been selected, will be commanding more than seven navy vessels. -- PHOTO: REUTERS

    A SINGAPOREAN navy officer will take charge of an international anti-piracy patrol coalition to curb the escalating violence off the waters of Somalia.

    The commander, who will be assisted by other officers from the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) officers, will lead the Combined Task Force (CTF) 15 from next January for three months.

    This is the first time a Singaporean is commander of a multinational peace support mission since Singapore Armed Forces' (SAF's) Brigadier-General Tan Huck Gim was appointed the Force Commander of the United Nations Mission of Support in East Timor (Unmiset) in 2002.

    Currently, the flotilla is being led by the Turkish navy.

    The Singaporean naval officer, who has not yet been selected, will be commanding more than seven navy vessels that come from countries including the United States, South Korea and Australia.

    Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean announced the deployment on Friday at the Changi Naval Base.

    He paid tribute to the 296 men and women who were back from their three-month stint in the Gulf. They worked onboard the Landing Ship Tank (LST) RSS Persistence, with two Super Puma helicopters.

    During their watch over the pirate-infested waters, they responded to 57 calls for assistance and launched 80 helicopter sorties.

    'The dedication, hard work and sheer determination of each member of the Task Group has made this mission a success for Singapore.'

    For their tour of duty, members of the team were awarded the SAF Overseas Service Medal.

    At Friday's event, DPM Teo, who is also Defence Minister, said the deployment put paid to the SAF's ability to integrate its forces on land, air and sea.

    'This demonstrates that the third-generation SAF is versatile, creative and operationally ready, capable of rapidly mobilising a wide spectrum of skills and resources to accomplish a wider spectrum of missions,' he said.

    The Straits Times

  11. #211
    Council Member Ken White's Avatar
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    Default Not to worry. Any nation that's sharp enough to make

    the equipment, education and training decisions that Singapore has made won't have any problems.

  12. #212
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
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    Default The other angle?

    What will be interesting to watch, although I expect we shall have to wait for historians, is how the changing commanders alters the perception of the CTF. Secondly how the commander relates to non-CTF "partners" like India and PRC. Especially so for the PRC-Singapore relationship.

    davidbfpo

  13. #213
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidbfpo View Post
    What will be interesting to watch, although I expect we shall have to wait for historians, is how the changing commanders alters the perception of the CTF. Secondly how the commander relates to non-CTF "partners" like India and PRC. Especially so for the PRC-Singapore relationship.

    davidbfpo
    I believe that the PLAN-RSN working relationship will be based on common area interests and the prime focus on maritime transport to travel those waters unimpeded.

    Somehow, I would also like to think that with the Turkish command, and the future Singaporean command, the perception of CTF might shift away from a "this is an American-led/influenced effort" towards one of a more neutral international reputation? Will that be plausible?

  14. #214
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    Default Plausible and reasonable (IMO)

    Choice of a Singaporean seems reasonable because it links the two bounds of the Indian Ocean pirate problem, from the Horn of Africa to the Straits. It also accords with my policy beliefs that the Indian Ocean is not a US or NATO lake. It also is not a Chinese lake (despite Menzies' book, "1421").

    Sort of takes us back to the pre-colonialization trade routes of the "Indonesian" (using that term generically for the SE Asian end of the arc) to India to Madagascar arc (that island being settled by folks from "Indonesia"). I wish your country good fortune in assuming this responsibility.

  15. #215
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    Default Image counts

    Quote Originally Posted by tpjkevin View Post
    (Taken from) Somehow, I would also like to think that with the Turkish command, and the future Singaporean command, the perception of CTF might shift away from a "this is an American-led/influenced effort" towards one of a more neutral international reputation? Will that be plausible?
    Others here can comment on Info Ops, but it would be worth trying. All depends who you want to inform or influence, e.g. Somalis. CTF IIRC has a website (or its predecessor did), having a commanders message and a Q&A; even an invite to the press to come aboard, even Al-Jazeera.

    davidbfpo

  16. #216
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    Default Russia detains ship 'hijackers'

    This may have little to do with the current string of piracy, or does it?

    Eight people have been arrested for hijacking the cargo ship Arctic Sea, Russia's defence minister says.

    ... the group of suspects included Russian, Estonian and Latvian nationals.

    The crew reported having been boarded by up to 10 armed men as the ship sailed through the Baltic Sea, but the intruders were reported to have left the vessel on an inflatable boat after 12 hours.
    If you want to blend in, take the bus

  17. #217
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    A new scheme for anti-piracy that goes beyond military measures but also tries to ensuree that shipping lines are well aware of what they can do to protect themselves.

    Self-awareness and basic precautions on the part of civilian shipping do play a big part. And I think Singapore can contribute a fair amount of knowledge to this battle against piracy given our daily efforts in the Malaccan Straits.

    S'pore in anti-piracy plan

    It's part of international group pledging to tackle threat off Somalia

    UNITED NATIONS - THE United States and four other nations, including Singapore, have signed onto an international plan to fight piracy off the coast of Somalia, committing to playing a leadership role in protecting one of the world's busiest shipping routes.

    The move came as the US government warned mariners on Tuesday to expect an increase in piracy off the Horn of Africa and in the Indian Ocean due to the end of the monsoon season and counselled seamen to be prepared to defend their vessels against maritime hijackers.
    The so-called 'New York Declaration' - signed on Wednesday by US Deputy Ambassador Rosemary DiCarlo and her counterparts from Britain, Cyprus, Japan and Singapore - is an attempt to pool resources and agree on the best ways of deterring the Somali pirates who prey on vessels sailing between Europe and Asia.

    'We realise that the fight against piracy in the Horn of Africa region cannot be solved entirely at sea,' Ms DiCarlo said.

    Other needed measures, she said, involve nations adopting legal mechanisms to prosecute suspected pirates and Somalia improving its capacity to police its own territory.

    A spokesman for Singapore's Ministry of Foreign Affairs told The Straits Times that signing the declaration was part of Singapore's 'strong commitment - as both a responsible maritime nation and a major ship registry - to the international community's efforts to combat piracy'.

    Though it is a non-binding political document, proponents say it will commit ship registry nations to adopt 'best management practices' for ship security such as increased lookouts, raised ladders and emergency fire pumps readied to repel boarders.

    It was first proposed in May by Panama, the Bahamas, Liberia and the Marshall Islands, four of the world's biggest ship registries. Those nations signed the declaration previously.

    In Washington, Mr Andrew Shapiro, US Assistant Secretary of State for political-military affairs, told the ComDef 2009 defence policy conference on Wednesday that the document represents what Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has called 'a 21st century solution to the 17th century problem' of piracy.

    By signing, the US says the Coast Guard and US shipping companies will continue adopting measures that comply with the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code to protect themselves against piracy.

    Read the full story in Friday's edition of The Straits Times.

    The Straits Times

    Associated Press

  18. #218
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
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    Default How the navies talk

    I seem to recall posting on how the various navies would co-operate dispite politics and the state of diplomatic relations; this helps to explain: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htt.../20090923.aspx

    davidbfpo

  19. #219
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    Default Dumb Pirates

    Target identification works both ways

    Somali Pirates Mistake French Military Vessel for Commercial ShipPARIS — Somali pirates in two skiffs fired on a French navy vessel early Wednesday after apparently mistaking it for a commercial boat, the French military said. The French ship gave chase and captured five suspected pirates.

    No one was wounded by the volleys from the Kalashnikov rifles directed at La Somme, a 3,800-ton refueling ship, said Rear Admiral Christophe Prazuck, a military spokesman.

  20. #220
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    Default Wrong camouflage or no Janes Warships to hand?

    Tom,

    In March 2009 pirates fired on a German naval supply vessel:

    Somali pirates by mistake attack a German Navy supply vessel, Germans fire back and chase ensues: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090330/...eXORo9.P9vaA8F
    Now a French naval vessel. Makes one wonder why pirates cannot distinguish between a warship (presumably in grey) and merchant ships.

    davidbfpo
    Last edited by davidbfpo; 10-07-2009 at 09:27 PM.

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