Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 53

Thread: Law Enforcement Analysis

  1. #21
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,099

    Default

    A free version of geographic profiling software, developed through a grant from the NIJ. The linked website includes the software download, tutorial, source code and other resources: Profiler

  2. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    9

    Default Law enforcement intelligence - stuck in a crime analysis rut?

    In my experience law enforcement/police intelligence (at least in the US) is still very much stuck in the crime analysis mindset, which is more reactive and less proactive.

    I would be interested to hear the thoughts/experiences of the forum.

  3. #23
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    13,346

    Default Intelligence-led policing?

    My experience in the USA was that intelligence meant an analyst preparing reports for management or within a specialist unit conducting research. There are examples of a different approach, see this thread:http://council.smallwarsjournal.com/...ad.php?t=12979

    'Intelligence-led policing' (ILP) was a mantra starting approximately fifteen years ago here in the UK, with a 'National Intelligence Model' (NIM) and sold to politicians as a new, cost-effective method of tackling volume crime (burglary and vehicle crime notably). The main theme of this ILP was to target the most active criminals, invariably using informants, surveillance, forensic science and investigation.

    ILP led to a large investment in I.T., in the UK rarely linked up (about to change) and critical reports years later questioning if had been effective. ILP made claims that it was responsible for reductions in volume crime that were countered by outsiders citing better security, a smaller group of young offenders and that many crimes were not reported / recorded.

    The police have always used recording and detection rates as the key indicator of performance. This emphasis in the UK became known as 'Key Performance Indicators' (KPI) and was driven by national government, seeking ever better performance in volume crime and particularly violent crime, mainly street robbery.

    What had been the mantra of ILP became KPI-policing with intelligence as some management-driven tool.

    ILP can be more pro-active and serve the wider public interest if requirements are clearer and not just reflecting local police management priorities - which are often not those of the public (incidentally I found US LE better tuned in on this point).
    Last edited by davidbfpo; 05-29-2011 at 10:59 AM.
    davidbfpo

  4. #24
    Council Member Fuchs's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,189

    Default

    I am deeply irritated by this seamless connection between small wars and domestic police work.

    Let's keep the warfare box closed for domestic affairs and not import whatever we do to foreign people!

    Don't mix this!

  5. #25
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    13,346

    Default Don't mix this POV: a riposte

    Fuchs,

    I do tend to agree with you at first reading:
    I am deeply irritated by this seamless connection between small wars and domestic police work. Let's keep the warfare box closed for domestic affairs and not import whatever we do to foreign people! Don't mix this!
    In several places, not just the USA, there has been an overlap between 'small wars' and 'domestic police work' partly due to the interaction of people and institutions - SWC is a place for this interaction and reflects IMHO a sizeable US law enforcement readership / membership. I've not looked at previous threads, so IIRC there has been a clear line drawn between the two spheres and not a 'seamless connection'.
    davidbfpo

  6. #26
    Council Member Fuchs's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,189

    Default

    The seamless connection is that it happens in the same forum.
    It does not belong here.

    Thread naming is irrelevant. The content is the problem. SWC forum facilitates the transfer of war-like methods to domestic state power, and that's just wrong.

    These small wars are in great part about how to suppress political opponents, after all.
    Population control and surveillance programs and attitudes are generally questionable, but they are specifically totally unacceptable in a domestic context.

  7. #27
    Council Member Ken White's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    8,060

    Default Sigh.

    You're both right.

    That said, I don't know what the best answer might be. I agree with Fuchs om the line blurring but it may be best if both of us just live with it...


  8. #28
    Council Member slapout9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    4,818

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slowandsteady View Post
    In my experience law enforcement/police intelligence (at least in the US) is still very much stuck in the crime analysis mindset, which is more reactive and less proactive.

    I would be interested to hear the thoughts/experiences of the forum.
    Tell us more about yourself and exactly what you are looking for.

    Moderator's Note: It is completely voluntary to provide an introduction about yourself, usually in the 'Hail & Farewell' thread; being a new SWC member there is nothing for others to see what you have commented on before. As for
    exactly what are you looking for
    that is a valid question.
    Last edited by davidbfpo; 05-29-2011 at 05:50 PM. Reason: Add Mod's Note and PM to author.

  9. #29
    Council Member slapout9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    4,818

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuchs View Post
    The seamless connection is that it happens in the same forum.
    It does not belong here.

    Thread naming is irrelevant. The content is the problem. SWC forum facilitates the transfer of war-like methods to domestic state power, and that's just wrong.

    These small wars are in great part about how to suppress political opponents, after all.
    Population control and surveillance programs and attitudes are generally questionable, but they are specifically totally unacceptable in a domestic context.
    Police Work is a small war, we invented it not the Army.

  10. #30
    Council Member slapout9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    4,818

    Default T.h.r.u.s.h.

    Fuchs, you have more to fear from THRUSH than the government. THRUSH was a private organization and Goggle,Face book, etc. are private organizations and they are a lot scarier than the government.

    T-Technological
    H-Hierarchy for the
    R-Removal of
    U-Undesirables and the
    S-Subjugation of
    H-Humanity

  11. #31
    Council Member Fuchs's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,189

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slapout9 View Post
    Fuchs, you have more to fear from THRUSH than the government. THRUSH was a private organization and Goggle,Face book, etc. are private organizations and they are a lot scarier than the government.

    I seem to need to remind you that a 5th of my people was living in a dictatorship for four of the last six decades. Tell me if I need to go back a few more years to make my point.

  12. #32
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    273

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuchs View Post
    I am deeply irritated by this seamless connection between small wars and domestic police work.

    Let's keep the warfare box closed for domestic affairs and not import whatever we do to foreign people!

    Don't mix this!
    I'm not sure it's avoidable. To some extent, the only difference between a police action and a counterinsurgency is the ideology of the non-state actors in question, Mexico being the current gold standard for this concept. To go in another direction, the Wikileaks hullabaloo blurs the line between small (info)war and criminal activity. Another example is that clashes with sovereign citizens could technically be considered small wars--section 1076 of HR5122(2006) could theoretically be used to get around posse comitatus.

  13. #33
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Sorry guys it was not my intention to ignore forum etiquette.

    I am a civillian analyst currently working as a contractor for law enforcement.

    Davidbfpo - thanks for the reply.

    Fuchs - For what it's worth I agree with you,and perhaps ironically given my current profession, I am a big believer in personal privacy.

    Slapout9 -Probably the best way to explain what I'm looking for is by giving an overview what I'm experiencing:

    1) Reports (by analysts) that describe crimes/criminal groups, there is no "so what/now what" mindset.
    2) A reluctance by middle and senior management to be more tactical in their approach, for example working with different units to develop a more detailed picture of the environment they are operating in.
    3) Communication - we have had guys working different ends of the same case from the same office, and yet not realized this. I believe the challenge is getting officers comfortable that sharing information won't compromise their case/job security.

    Basically I'd just appreciate hearing a different perspective,from what I've read so far on this forum there are folks from all kinds of backgrounds here on small wars, and I'm keen to learn from that.

  14. #34
    Council Member slapout9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    4,818

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slowandsteady View Post

    I am a civillian analyst currently working as a contractor for law enforcement.
    I have highlighted what may be the problem. It is going to take a while for you to be accepted. Have you ever worked the Streets? How long have you been an analyst?

  15. #35
    Council Member slapout9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    4,818

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuchs View Post
    I seem to need to remind you that a 5th of my people was living in a dictatorship for four of the last six decades. Tell me if I need to go back a few more years to make my point.
    No need to remind me because I never new it in the first place,so I will remember in the future. But it doesn't change my opinion that the threat from privatized intelligence (information) companies that could be used to do the things you fear most is greater than any western style police gestapo. May be different where you live.

  16. #36
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slapout9 View Post
    I have highlighted what may be the problem. It is going to take a while for you to be accepted. Have you ever worked the Streets? How long have you been an analyst?
    No and 7 years.

  17. #37
    Council Member Fuchs's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,189

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slapout9 View Post
    No need to remind me because I never new it in the first place,so I will remember in the future. But it doesn't change my opinion that the threat from privatized intelligence (information) companies that could be used to do the things you fear most is greater than any western style police gestapo. May be different where you live.
    We have no Patriot Act...

  18. #38
    Council Member Sergeant T's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    67

    Default

    In my experience law enforcement/police intelligence (at least in the US) is still very much stuck in the crime analysis mindset, which is more reactive and less proactive.
    Fusion centers were supposed to address this to some degree. From the street level I never saw any evidence of that. For that matter, I saw very little evidence that they actually existed at all. They were the Roach Motel of information. To be of any use or utility at all intelligence would have to flow both ways across jurisdictional boundaries, and that seems anathema to just about every law enforcement organization's genetic programming.

    I came to the conclusion a few years ago that police intelligence/crime analysis is always going to be in a rut to some degree because all of their "wins" are tactical in nature. (Granted, some tactical wins are pretty big, but none rise to the level of game changer.) You don't get a strategic win because as you're taking perps off the conveyor belt at your end new ones are being fed into the game on the back end. The philosophical underpinning would be Camus's Myth of Sisyphus. I always wanted a unit patch with this image..



    And I'd have to agree hard with Slap. ChoicePoint (now part of LexisNexus) and the big three credit agencies wield an impressive amount of data and power. Anybody with an Android phone and a gmail account volunteers an incredible amount of information to a company we're trusting to be benevolent.

  19. #39
    Council Member slapout9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    4,818

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slowandsteady View Post
    No and 7 years.
    If understand the problem correctly? you are frustrated because of a lack of results from your hard efforts?

  20. #40
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Southport NC
    Posts
    48

    Default It's already mixed up.

    Quote Originally Posted by davidbfpo View Post
    Fuchs,

    I do tend to agree with you at first reading:

    In several places, not just the USA, there has been an overlap between 'small wars' and 'domestic police work' partly due to the interaction of people and institutions - SWC is a place for this interaction and reflects IMHO a sizeable US law enforcement readership / membership. I've not looked at previous threads, so IIRC there has been a clear line drawn between the two spheres and not a 'seamless connection'.
    Soldiers in Baghdad used such systems for LEO work there. Just so happens, it may be something that needs to be shared if only to show the Military how far things are going. They have the weapons and they took an Oath. Even the database system was posted in one of the forums here. There was an insightful thread, just not up to hunting it down right now.

Similar Threads

  1. Syria: the case for action
    By davidbfpo in forum Middle East
    Replies: 161
    Last Post: 10-01-2013, 06:30 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-01-2013, 09:10 AM
  3. Amu
    By skiguy in forum Training & Education
    Replies: 72
    Last Post: 01-01-2010, 08:57 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •