Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 53

Thread: Law Enforcement Analysis

  1. #1
    Council Member bismark17's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Seattle, Wa
    Posts
    206

    Default Law Enforcement Analysis

    Any papers, books, or any other suggestions for Crime or Intelligence Analysis in Law Enforcement? I work as a Crime Analyst at the Precinct level and am trying to fine tune more in depth "go fast" products for my Chain of Command to create more actionable intel for them. Any suggestions would be great. Thanks in advance. Don't worry if they are Military related, I was a trained Infantry Officer at one time....many years/pounds ago.... If you are concerned about security aspects I can be reached directly at 206-684-0859. If you are going to send examples I can only receive LE sensitive items. I no longer have a Secret clearance. Thanks again!!

  2. #2
    Council Member slapout9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    4,818

    Default Question?

    Before I respond, if you are still POST certifed what happened to your secret clearance??

  3. #3
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,098

    Default

    First off, I recommend you sign up for the LEAnalyst list-serv. Its a non-secure e-mail list-serv that is useful for putting you into contact with a wide network of LE intel types across the spectrum from state and local to fed level.
    The primary purpose of the LEANALYST mailing list is to provide a place where law enforcement employees (sworn and non-sworn), academia (instructors and students), and businesses providing products or services to the law enforcement community can meet and exchange information, methods, and ideas regarding the analysis of crime. We allow other law enforcement-related postings in order to encourage a free flow of information regarding all manner of law enforcement concerns.
    There are also two professional organizations that can help you out:

    The International Association of Crime Analysts makes available a lot of useful little tools through the "Resources" link on their website. They've also published a pretty decent book Exploring Crime Analysis: Readings on Essential Skills that covers a wide range of skills and analytic techniques used to support LE.

    The International Association of Law Enforcement Intelligence Analysts doesn't have their website set up quite as nicely as IACA, but there are still some decent resources there and you can connect with a good group of people.

  4. #4
    Council Member sgmgrumpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ft Leavenworth Kansas
    Posts
    168

    Default Good Start

    Quote Originally Posted by bismark17
    Any papers, books, or any other suggestions for Crime or Intelligence Analysis in Law Enforcement? I work as a Crime Analyst at the Precinct level and am trying to fine tune more in depth "go fast" products for my Chain of Command to create more actionable intel for them. Any suggestions would be great. Thanks in advance. Don't worry if they are Military related, I was a trained Infantry Officer at one time....many years/pounds ago.... If you are concerned about security aspects I can be reached directly at 206-684-0859. If you are going to send examples I can only receive LE sensitive items. I no longer have a Secret clearance. Thanks again!!

    I would start researching here.

    http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/Default.asp?Item=1404

  5. #5
    Council Member slapout9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    4,818

    Default Start here

    1-See your chief, get the security thing fixed, you are going to need it for the best stuff. Should not be a problem, many analyst types have this that work at Police dept.

    2-Contact local FBI office join local VICAP task force(this is real profiling not TV bull****)

    3-website www.popcenter.org (Problem Oriented Police Site) this is the best! They have a number military style "how to do it" manuals on many crimes. This is all fast start stuff. They even have several manuals on how to be a crime analysts. They even have an online real time analysis program you can use.

    4-I will PM you with some names and numbers for personal contacts. You can use my name, maybe kick open a few doors for you.

    5-Keep reading on this website amazing how much you can adapt to police work. Pay attention to JEDBURGH's stuff he was an LE analyst or still is.
    Good Luck.

  6. #6
    Council Member bismark17's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Seattle, Wa
    Posts
    206

    Default Follow Up

    Thanks for the responses. I am in IAILEA and HTIA but have found a lot of it to be very generalized content. I just hooked up with someone in the Intel community who should help get the ball rolling. I guess I was looking for examples of products and conceptual frameworks since I am producing them on the fly and would like to get more professional with standardization and such. Basically, I am trying to develop a one man fusion cell at the Precinct level so my resources are pretty slim. As for my Department to pay for me to get a Federal security clearance that will happen about the same time as Paris Hilton goes celibate. I had one when I was in the Army but I have been out of the military since 2000. The only ones on my Department that have clearances are Task Force Officers with DEA or FBI such as the JTTF.

    I think I am heading in the right direction and am pretty excited. Right now I am just producing standard word docs with embedded powerpoint or excel slides for the statistical analysis parts. I have got some of my best ideas from reading books by financial analysts and am reading "See No Evil" which I highly recommend. I will get back on Leanalyst. Years ago when I was still in Patrol I was on that list and got off it due to a lack of relevance. I just attended the DEA Federal Law Enforcment Intelligence Analysis course at Quantico and a couple of classmates suggested it and to be honest I forgot to get back on there! Thanks again for the suggestions. This is a tremendous resource. And as for Jedburgh, I make him a must read.

  7. #7
    DDilegge
    Guest

    Default Best LEO Intel Source I Know...

    ... is Sgt John Sullivan of the LA Sheriff’s Department. He set up the LASD Intel Center well before 9/11, is a prolific writer on threat related issues and analysis and, in my opinion, one of the shining stars of the LEO community. I am PM'ing you his e-mail address.

    BTW - John is a close friend and professional associate of Capt. Sid Heal - another shining star in all things Small Wars and Homeland Defense. The LASD should count its lucky stars that they have both amongst their ranks.
    Last edited by SWJED; 06-10-2006 at 05:07 PM.

  8. #8
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,098

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bismark17
    I guess I was looking for examples of products and conceptual frameworks since I am producing them on the fly and would like to get more professional with standardization and such. Basically, I am trying to develop a one man fusion cell at the Precinct level so my resources are pretty slim.
    Well, that makes your request a bit more specific. In that case I recommend joining the FPS Portal, which is an Extranet Secure Portal portal with a forum, chat, messaging, and a library archive. The library section will address that specific request you just mentioned - you will find plenty of products at the Unclass/ LES/FOUO level from state fusion centers and the fed level, as well as some from MI units supporting the Homeland Security mission. Send me your official e-mail address and I will provide you with the POC to get on the system.

    Also, are you on WSIN? If your dept. doesn't have it set up for you, I highly recommend you start pressuring the people who can.

    Regarding setting up a "one man fusion cell", believe me, I really empathize with you. That was roughly what I had to attempt to get working when I was working with the Joint Gang Task Force. Its a rough job when not a single one of the jurisdictions involved has any connectivity with the others.

    If you don't have a copy of this yet, this book published last year by DoJ is a useful read:

    Guidelines for Establishing and Operating Fusion Centers at the Local, State, Tribal and Federal Level

  9. #9
    Council Member bismark17's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Seattle, Wa
    Posts
    206

    Default New Field Manual

    I just came across, FM 3-19.50 Police Intelligence Operations, from the Secrecynews newsletter. It looks pretty good. The section on work products could be better but all in all it's a good introduction to Police Intel. You could combine this with several other Intel related manuals and RAND products and get rolling at a Precinct level. I tried to submit a pdf of the Manual without success. Email me if you want me to send a copy or hopefully somebody can post it in the documents section.
    Last edited by bismark17; 07-20-2006 at 07:58 PM.

  10. #10
    Small Wars Journal SWJED's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Largo, Florida
    Posts
    3,989

    Default Thanks bismark....

    Quote Originally Posted by bismark17
    I just came across, FM 3-19.50 Police Intelligence Operations, from the Secrecynews newsletter. It looks pretty good. The section on work products could be better but all in all it's a good introduction to Police Intel. You could combine this with several other Intel related manuals and RAND products and get rolling at a Precinct level. I tried to submit a pdf of the Manual without success. Email me if you want me to send a copy or hopefully somebody can post it in the documents section.
    Here is the link to the manual via Secrecy News - U.S. Army Issues Manual on Police Intelligence Operations.

    A new U.S. Army Field Manual (pdf) introduces the concept of "police intelligence operations," an emerging hybrid of military intelligence and law enforcement.

    "Police intelligence operations are a military police function that supports, enhances, and contributes to a commander's situational understanding and battlefield visualization and FP [force protection] programs by portraying the relevant criminal threat and friendly information, which may affect his operational and tactical environment."

    The new manual presents doctrine that is broadly applicable to support military operations abroad as well as domestic military facility protection.

    A copy of the new manual was obtained by Secrecy News.
    I am also going to give this its own thread for comments....

  11. #11
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,098

    Default

    For those with an interest:
    The Crime Mapping & Analysis Program (CMAP) is proud to announce the release of the Crime Analysis Unit Developer's Kit. The CAU Developer's Kit is a unique collection of documents, tools, and examples to assist in the design, creation, implementation, and expansion of any crime analysis unit. This assembly of information, examples, and software utilities is provided as a free public service by CMAP, a program of the US Department of Justice.

    The Developer's Kit includes a variety of important articles and publications on analytical processes, procedures, and methods from acknowledged experts in the field. It also includes numerous examples of crime bulletins, routine products, work analysis, flowcharts, timelines, job descriptions, mission statements, internship announcements, statistics, and other materials that can be used as templates or starting points.

    The CAU Developer's Kit contains numerous free software applications, including:

    * Two GIS programs - A complete, self-contained desktop Geographic Information Systems.

    * Two Geographic Profiling utilities - Dragnet-K, the stand-alone original GP software from the University of Liverpool, and Ian Oldfield's GP Spreadsheet for Excel.

    * The Crime Analysis Spatial Extension - Tactical crime analysis tools for ArcGIS similar to the USGS Animal Movements Extension for ArcView.

    * Two Link-charting programs - Network, organizational, flow, and linkage diagram design software utilities with analytical functions.

    * Six Statistics programs - Complete and robust statistics as powerful as any expensive application.

    * OpenOffice - A complete office program suite that includes a word processor, spreadsheet/grapher, relational database, presentation/slideshow, diagram tool, and mathematical modeling utility.

    All software is provided free of charge by CMAP and the developers for use by the US law enforcement community.

    Altogether, more than 100 files have been selected and packaged for this inaugural release of the Crime Analysis Unit Developer's Kit, a product of CMAP, the Crime Mapping & Analysis Program. Be warned, this is a very large download because it contains so much material - a smaller download, without software files, is also available for low-bandwidth users.

    Please visit http://www.crimeanalysts.net and click on the Resources tab to download and install your copy of these useful tools and documents, or write to cmap@crimeanalysts.net to find out more.

  12. #12
    Council Member sgmgrumpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ft Leavenworth Kansas
    Posts
    168

    Default Mapping Crime: Understanding Hot Spots

    Mapping Crime: Understanding Hot Spots http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/209393.pdf


    Much of crime mapping is devoted to detecting high-crime-density areas known as hot spots. Hot spot analysis helps police identify high-crime areas, types of crime being committed, and the best way to respond.
    This report discusses hot spot analysis techniques and software and identifies when to use each one. The visual display of a crime pattern on a map should be consistent with the type of hot spot and possible police action. For example, when hot spots are at specific addresses, a dot map is more appropriate than an area map, which would be too imprecise.
    In this report, chapters progress in sophistication.

    Contents

    Chapter 1. Crime Hot Spots: What They Are, Why We Have Them, and How to Map Them

    Chapter 2. Methods and Techniques for Understanding Crime Hot Spots

    Chapter 3. Spatial Analysis Tools for Identifying Hot Spots

    The report can be used as a companion to another crime mapping report published by the National Institute of Justice in 1999, Crime Mapping: Principle and Practice, by Keith Harries.


    Identifying hot spots requires multiple techniques; no single method is sufficient
    to analyze all types of crime.

    Current mapping technologies have significantly
    improved the ability of crime analysts and researchers to understand crime patterns and victimization.

    Crime hot spot maps can most effectively
    guide police action when production of the maps is guided by crime theories (place, victim, street, or neighborhood).

  13. #13
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,098

    Default

    FYI - as GIS applications mature, I'm sure we will begin to see more of this open to the public (at least domestically):
    The Chicago Police Department developed this web application to provide residents of the City of Chicago with a tool to assist them in problem-solving and combating crime and disorder in their neighborhoods. It is based upon the CLEAR (Citizen Law Enforcement Analysis and Reporting) system developed by the Department for use by its police officers.

    This web application enables you to search the Chicago Police Department's database of reported crime. You will be able to see maps, graphs, and tables of reported crime. The database contains 90 days of information which you can access in blocks of up to 14 days. Data is refreshed daily. However, the most recent information is back-dated 7 days from today's date.

    The site can be accessed at http://gis.chicagopolice.org

    All feedback is welcomed through email or blog links.

  14. #14
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,098

    Default

    Published by JMIC in Mar 06, but I finally just got around to looking it over:

    Out of Bounds: Innovation and Change in Law Enforcement Intelligence
    Deborah Osborne’s Out of Bounds: Innovation and Change in Law Enforcement Intelligence Analysis addresses the changing nature and role of analysis in policing. Osborne’s examination, though, focuses not only on the analytical process, but on the analysts—critical actors who function with relative anonymity.

    Osborne employs a provocative method of study: appreciative inquiry. In essence, analysts tell their stories: what motivates them, what successes they have enjoyed, what processes have worked well for them, how they see the future. A picture emerges of women and men who have great passion for their work, and who make tremendous contributions to solving crimes, interrupting crime patterns, apprehending criminals, and even preventing crime. By studying what works, the appreciative inquiry process draws out the themes that characterize these successes: innovative thinking; creative problem solving; intraagency teamwork; collaboration and information sharing among agencies....
    The link is to the pdf, but the book is available through both the GPO and Amazon.

  15. #15
    Council Member sgmgrumpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ft Leavenworth Kansas
    Posts
    168

    Default Problem-oriented policing (POP)

    This is an excellent on-line learning center for LEOs

    Problem-oriented policing is an approach to policing in which discrete pieces of police business (each consisting of a cluster of similar incidents, whether crime or acts of disorder, that the police are expected to handle) are subject to microscopic examination (drawing on the especially honed skills of crime analysts and the accumulated experience of operating field personnel) in hopes that what is freshly learned about each problem will lead to discovering a new and more effective strategy for dealing with it. Problem-oriented policing places a high value on new responses that are preventive in nature, that are not dependent on the use of the criminal justice system, and that engage other public agencies, the community and the private sector when their involvement has the potential for significantly contributing to the reduction of the problem. Problem-oriented policing carries a commitment to implementing the new strategy, rigorously evaluating its effectiveness, and, subsequently, reporting the results in ways that will benefit other police agencies and that will ultimately contribute to building a body of knowledge that supports the further professionalization of the police.
    -Herman Goldstein 2001
    CENTER FOR PROBLEM-ORIENETED POLICING

    http://www.popcenter.org/default.cfm

  16. #16
    Council Member marct's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    3,682

    Default DEA publishes document on the use of analysts

    Via the IALEIA site

    The US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has long been out front in the use of intelligence and analysis to support law enforcement objectives. This report on their use of analysts has just been released:

    DEA OIG Report on the Use of Analysts, May 2008
    Sic Bisquitus Disintegrat...
    Marc W.D. Tyrrell, Ph.D.
    Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies,
    Senior Research Fellow,
    The Canadian Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies, NPSIA
    Carleton University
    http://marctyrrell.com/

  17. #17
    Council Member Tom Odom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    DeRidder LA
    Posts
    3,949

    Default

    We also found significant delays in the issuance of intelligence reports.
    Prior to dissemination of its intelligence reports, the DEA performs a lengthy
    review to ensure the accuracy of the information. We tested 16 strategic
    reports and found they were published on average about 21 months after
    the source information was first observed by the DEA.
    Wow no wonder the DEA is winning the war on drugs....

    Tom

  18. #18
    Council Member marct's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    3,682

    Talking Ain't bureaucracy wonderful

    ..........
    Sic Bisquitus Disintegrat...
    Marc W.D. Tyrrell, Ph.D.
    Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies,
    Senior Research Fellow,
    The Canadian Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies, NPSIA
    Carleton University
    http://marctyrrell.com/

  19. #19
    Council Member Ron Humphrey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,099

    Wink Hey, Makes perfect sense

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Odom View Post
    Wow no wonder the DEA is winning the war on drugs....

    Tom
    in a job security kinda way. If it takes 21 months to let us know that enemy C has been nuetralized and it takes enemy D approximately 12-15 months to get to a size of which is concern then somebody's guaranteed work for at least, Forever
    Any man can destroy that which is around him, The rare man is he who can find beauty even in the darkest hours

    Cogitationis poenam nemo patitur

  20. #20
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,098

    Default

    IACA has updated their certification program and released a new study guide:

    IACA Certification Exam Study Guide
    This study guide is to be used as a supplement to materials used in preparing for the IACA Certification Exam. It is not meant to be the sole study tool for the exam. Questions on the exam may be worded differently than concepts provided in this study guide. This study guide is not all-inclusive and only provides general concepts that are covered on the exam. This study guide should also be used in combination with other references in addition to IACA’s Exploring Crime Analysis book.
    FYI, the IACA certification currently isn't very widespread. According to the organization, there are just ten Certified Law Enforcement Analysts in the US and three in Canada - with another two waiting to take the exam by the end of this year......

Similar Threads

  1. Syria: the case for action
    By davidbfpo in forum Middle East
    Replies: 161
    Last Post: 10-01-2013, 06:30 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-01-2013, 09:10 AM
  3. Amu
    By skiguy in forum Training & Education
    Replies: 72
    Last Post: 01-01-2010, 08:57 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •