Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Washington Post: Monitoring America

  1. #1
    Council Member davidbfpo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    13,346

    Default US CT: the hi-tech way

    Some months ago the Washington Post published a series on 'The Secrets Next Door' (see links below) and today added a new report 'Monitoring America', a good part revolving around Memphis:http://projects.washingtonpost.com/t...oring-america/

    I have merged the SWJ post (x5) to this:http://council.smallwarsjournal.com/...ad.php?t=10956

    This appeared on the thread 'The USA is different: FBI investigations' and may help. I was puzzled at the time of the original reports there was IIRC little comment.
    Last edited by davidbfpo; 12-22-2010 at 09:40 PM. Reason: Copied here and last paragraph added
    davidbfpo

  2. #2
    Council Member bourbon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    903

    Default Washington Post: Monitoring America

    Monitoring America, by Dana Priest and William M. Arkin. The Washington Post, 20 December 2010.
    Today's story, along with related material on The Post's Web site, examines how Top Secret America plays out at the local level. It describes a web of 4,058 federal, state and local organizations, each with its own counterterrorism responsibilities and jurisdictions. At least 935 of these organizations have been created since the 2001 attacks or became involved in counterterrorism for the first time after 9/11.

    (Search our database for your state to find a detailed profile of counterterrorism efforts in your community.)

    The months-long investigation, based on nearly 100 interviews and 1,000 documents, found that:

    * Technologies and techniques honed for use on the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan have migrated into the hands of law enforcement agencies in America.

    * The FBI is building a database with the names and certain personal information, such as employment history, of thousands of U.S. citizens and residents whom a local police officer or a fellow citizen believed to be acting suspiciously. It is accessible to an increasing number of local law enforcement and military criminal investigators, increasing concerns that it could somehow end up in the public domain.

    * Seeking to learn more about Islam and terrorism, some law enforcement agencies have hired as trainers self-described experts whose extremist views on Islam and terrorism are considered inaccurate and counterproductive by the FBI and U.S. intelligence agencies.

    * The Department of Homeland Security sends its state and local partners intelligence reports with little meaningful guidance, and state reports have sometimes inappropriately reported on lawful meetings.

  3. #3
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    1,602

    Default

    * Seeking to learn more about Islam and terrorism, some law enforcement agencies have hired as trainers self-described experts whose extremist views on Islam and terrorism are considered inaccurate and counterproductive by the FBI and U.S. intelligence agencies.
    This is a real problem, especially with the rapid expansion in the number of agencies, departments, and organizations asked to address terrorism issues. I'm stunned at times at the nonsense I hear (and not only from folks in LE, the same holds true in MI too).
    They mostly come at night. Mostly.


  4. #4
    Council Member bourbon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    903

    Default "When everything is intelligence - nothing is intelligence"

    The fact that there has not been much terrorism to worry about is not evident on the Tennessee fusion center's Web site. Click on the incident map, and the state appears to be under attack.

    Red icons of explosions dot Tennessee, along with blinking exclamation marks and flashing skulls. The map is labeled: "Terrorism Events and Other Suspicious Activity.

    But if you roll over the icons, the explanations that pop up have nothing to do with major terrorist plots: "Johnson City police are investigating three 'bottle bombs' found at homes over the past three days," one description read recently. ". . . The explosives were made from plastic bottles with something inside that reacted chemically and caused the bottles to burst."
    Let me guess, it was either dry ice or Diet Coke and Mentos.

  5. #5
    Council Member Stan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Estonia
    Posts
    3,817

    Default A very good point Bourbon

    Quote Originally Posted by bourbon View Post
    Let me guess, it was either dry ice or Diet Coke and Mentos.
    The problem with most of these reports is they do not specify if the "explosion or detonation" actually contained explosives or even had anything to do with explosives. There was a point in 2003 where power lines had burst and the call in to 911 was immediately labeled "explosion".

    Public awareness and State funding. The public is blind and the LEOs are counting on terror to retain funding.
    If you want to blend in, take the bus

  6. #6
    Council Member slapout9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    4,818

    Default

    Has anybody seen the articles where Wal-Mart is going to install giant TV screens with the massage, if you See something, then Say Something. I feel safer already

  7. #7
    Council Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,099

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bourbon
    * Seeking to learn more about Islam and terrorism, some law enforcement agencies have hired as trainers self-described experts whose extremist views on Islam and terrorism are considered inaccurate and counterproductive by the FBI and U.S. intelligence agencies.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rex Brynen
    This is a real problem, especially with the rapid expansion in the number of agencies, departments, and organizations asked to address terrorism issues. I'm stunned at times at the nonsense I hear (and not only from folks in LE, the same holds true in MI too).
    Rex - now that you've been on INTELST for a while, you've been fully exposed to some of the most vocal idiots in the field. Not to mention those who shoot out RFIs that appear structured only to elicit feedback to support a predetermined "inaccurate and counterproductive" judgment. But I'm sure you've also noticed that it tends to be the same cluster of individuals almost all the time.

    With regard to the trainers for local and state LE who are milking the CT/AT cow, I've also seen some incredibly ignorant stuff put out here in my state of residence - but the local Bureau rep(s) also tend to be present, implying at least tacit acceptance, if not endorsement, by the Feds of what is being presented.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •