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Old 05-25-2012   #21
ganulv
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Leaving aside for a moment the relationship to counterinsurgency and allowing me to oversimplify a bit: with public health-related projects greater avoided costs over the long term are associated with greater upfront costs. Rational planning of a public health-related project should begin by asking whether avoiding cost over time is the raison d'être. If the answer is “yes,” the next question should be whether meeting the upfront costs is feasible (not a purely financial matter, as there are political and social realities to take into consideration).

Returning to the issue of counterinsurgency, is there real evidence that providing healthcare is a successful means of winning hearts and minds?* I’m not trying to be a troll here but rather am seriously asking whether the concept can truly be said to rise above the level of assertion.

*Note that my question is not whether providing access to healthcare improves quality of life. I am taking that for granted.
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Old 05-25-2012   #22
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Default Healthcare is a successful means of winning H&M?

Ganulv posted:
Quote:
Returning to the issue of counterinsurgency, is there real evidence that providing healthcare is a successful means of winning hearts and minds?* I’m not trying to be a troll here but rather am seriously asking whether the concept can truly be said to rise above the level of assertion.
Certainly in my reading on the campaign in Malaya and especially Oman there are references to the impact of providing basic medical aid in locations that had none.

My impression is that basic medical aid - in Oman - helped secure the loyalty of local people as proof the new Sultan cared before more extensive and expensive options arrived, such as building roads.
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Old 05-26-2012   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidbfpo View Post
My impression is that basic medical aid - in Oman - helped secure the loyalty of local people as proof the new Sultan cared before more extensive and expensive options arrived, such as building roads.
I don’t know the first thing about that conflict, can you recommend a reading or viewing for beginners? It would be interesting to see whether the initial medical aid was meant to be—or at least to be perceived as—the first step towards a long term medical infrastructure (as opposed to medics periodically showing up to pull teeth and hand out quinine).
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Old 05-26-2012   #24
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Ganulv,

You asked two questions:
Quote:
I don’t know the first thing about that conflict, can you recommend a reading or viewing for beginners?
If you search SWC on Dhofar (the province) and Oman there are many posts, but for a reading list - not on medicine - there is this now merged thread:


Quote:
It would be interesting to see whether the initial medical aid was meant to be—or at least to be perceived as—the first step towards a long term medical infrastructure (as opposed to medics periodically showing up to pull teeth and hand out quinine).
My recollection is that medicine appears as a phrase, maybe a sentence and not in detail. It is a long time since I've done any reading on the campaign, so perhaps a Google search might find new sources.
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Old 06-28-2012   #25
Madhu
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Here are some other references and sites that I've dug up. No idea if they will be helpful or not. I have no affiliation with the following, but the links seem interesting:


1. Afghanmed.org - Afghan Medical Organization of America

2. TATRC (tatrc.org) - telemedicine

3.
Quote:
MEDCAP operations recently returned to activity in Iraq and Afghanistan. They started in a rather improvised way before integrating into a strategy aimed to “win hearts and minds.” Whereas their impact on the health of the population remains unknown, military health authorities have been rather enthusiastic about their impact on the perception of the US military by the local population (Cascells 2009). In 2009 the approach developed into a new concept, the Medical Stability Operations (MSOs), which would build on the experience of MEDCAP in a more professional and effective way (Pueschel, 2009). Recognizing the limits of MEDCAP, the new strategy seeks to learn from this experience and to collaborate with humanitarian organizations (SOMA conference, 2009). In order to facilitate collaboration with humanitarian actors, the US military forces have created a guide covering its interaction with NGOs: “The guide shows how the military can work with NGOs that may not want to be perceived as being aligned with people in uniform on the ground” (US DoD, Jan. 2010).
http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org...at=perceptions

4. http://icsr.info/blog/Short-Circuiting-Taliban-Media

5. http://www.globalmedicine.org/GMN/index.asp

6. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/0...n_1344877.html

Quote:
The aptly named Jungle School of Medicine Kawthoolei may be a far cry from what Westerners would typically consider an advanced school and medical clinic.

Both structures were built by the local Karen villagers using locally grown resources. Blankets on the floor take the place of clinical beds, and instead of desks students complete assignments on metal folding tables. But the facility's very existence means access to a level of health care and health education that was desperately needed.
7. http://www.ramcjournal.com/past_2011.html (in particular, International Military Medical Engagement with the Indigenous Health Sector - Afghan Security Forces Medical Services, Bricknell, Grigson)

8. http://www.centcom.mil/news/coalitio...-combat-medics

9. http://gh.websedgemedia.com/conferen...r_afghanistan/

The link goes directly to audio!!!!

Quote:
Global Health TV's Stephen Horn talks with Shainoor Khoja, Director of Corporate Affairs at Afghan telecommunications company, Roshan. Khoja, shares her experiences establishing telemedicine and micro-financing initiatives and explains how these ideas can help other developing countries.
10. http://afghanistan.usaid.gov/en/USAI...cal_University

Higher Education Project Kabul Medical University

11. http://www.jsomonline.org/Publicatio...7148Keenan.pdf

Role of Medicine in Supporting Special Forces Counter-Insurgency Operations in Southern Afghanistan

12. And finally, because I think it matters as background:

https://globalsociology.pbworks.com/...Stratification

Modernization theory and development stuff. I keep being told no one believes in such a linear process anymore, except it still seems to form a sort of basis for some of our interaction with other nations. Help, other council members! Am I off-base with this line of thinking?

http://tinyurl.com/8yhbpxw

(Modernization and Medical Care, Sociological Perspective, Gallagher E, 1988)

Quote:
The introduction of modern medicine into developing societies is an important topic for social-scientific analysis. Here I draw upon modernization theory to illuminate this topic. Using Peter Berger's notion of "carriers of modernity," I discuss health care as such a carrier. Compared with premodern modes of health care, modern health care has a calculable, "commodity" character. Its production has become a major and increasingly systematized sector of the economy. In addition to its manifest clinical benefits, health care conveys the symbolic meanings of modernity. It participates in the broad though uneven passage of technology and values from Western societies to metropolitan areas in developing societies and thence to the hinterland. Health care as the focus of demodernization strains is also examined, through case examples drawn from Amish and Islamic contexts.


Again, this is not an area I know very well so the references and links I provide are for discussion and education. I have more links that might be of interest and will post as time permits. I am a forever SKEPTIC on the third party development game, but it doesn't hurt to study and learn what can be studied and learned....or something like that.
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Old 06-28-2012   #26
Madhu
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Oh, and because I've seemed to have gone off in a different direction from my original comments, an abstract on online medical curriculums:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2823389/

Quote:
The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and the National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics (NCHPEG) have expressed the need for the education of physicians about the ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) related to genetic testing and counseling. To help address this need, we have developed and assessed an Internet-based curriculum to educate medical students about topics related to the ELSI associated with genetic testing and counseling. We developed content and interactive features for five core modules and evaluated their effect on students' knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and intended behavior. Statistically significant increases in knowledge and positive changes in attitude, self-efficacy and intended behavior were observed in all these studies. We believe that this web-based curriculum is a valuable supplement to typical medical school genetics coursework and an effective means of teaching students about ELSI associated with genetic testing and counseling. The modules are available online for review by the general public for free and for use by medical student groups at a nominal charge at www.GeneticSolutions.com.

So, my basic point in linking the above is that lots of stuff is already available online and for free, so if anyone wants to adapt a cell phone medical curriculum or translate it to radio or whatever, the material is already out there. Tons and tons and tons of it.

No need to re-invent the wheel, yada yada yada.

Found other sites of interest, don't know a thing about any of it, but as examples:

http://medicalcurriculum.com/

http://www.acpmedicine.com/acpmedici...wc_prog.action

Quote:
The ACP Medicine Weekly Curriculum is a convenient email-based program that guides residents through an ongoing study of the key elements of internal medicine and patient care from ACP Medicine, an official publication of the American College of Physicians. The program is simple and economical. Each week, program directors and their residents receive an email alerting them that the new Weekly Curriculum has been published live online. The email contains a tip and goals relating to a chapter and questions published in ACP Medicine. The email also contains a link to the chapter. Residents review the chapter, click on the convenient ACP Medicine link in the email to access the ACP Medicine Web site (provided to you and all your residents as part of your Weekly Curriculum subscription). There they access the Weekly Curriculum tab at the top of the screen, and enter their user name and password. The residents take the weekly test online and receive immediate feedback on their scores, with detailed discussions of the topics and the answers, as well as access to the full text of the related chapters for additional review.

Last edited by Madhu; 06-28-2012 at 07:30 AM.
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Old 06-28-2012   #27
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Okay, one more for now and then I'll give it a rest for a bit:

Quote:
This is the second in a series of three papers that examine the role of international military medical services in stability operations in unstable countries. The paper discusses security sector reform in general terms and highlights the interdependency of the armed forces, police, judiciary and penal systems in creating a ‘secure environment’. The paper then looks at components of a local military medical system for a counter-insurgency campaign operating on interior lines and the contribution and challenges faced by the international military medical community in supporting the development of this system. Finally the paper highlights the importance of planning the medical support of the international military personnel who will be supporting wider aspects of security sector reform. The paper is based on background research and my personal experience as Medical Director in the Headquarters of the NATO International Stability Assistance Force in Afghanistan in 2006.
http://www.ramcjournal.com/2007/jun07/bricknell.pdf

So, what happens to the brick-and-mortar once we can't be there or funding dries up? That's why I'm interested in the stuff that's already available, so to speak.

There is a fair amount of educational "medical tourism" to neighboring countries and other countries, too.

http://www.afghana.com/SocietyAndCul...sociations.htm

Last edited by davidbfpo; 06-28-2012 at 06:02 PM. Reason: Fix spacing in quote
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Old 06-29-2012   #28
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Default It’s like they say about Brazil…

Quote:
Originally Posted by Madhu View Post
Modernization theory and development stuff. I keep being told no one believes in such a linear process anymore, except it still seems to form a sort of basis for some of our interaction with other nations. Help, other council members! Am I off-base with this line of thinking?
O país do futuro! E sempre será. The fact that the term “Developing World” continues to be used despite decades of evidence to the contrary says more about the nature of belief than it does about the validity of modernization theory, if you ask me.
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Last edited by ganulv; 06-29-2012 at 12:13 AM.
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Old 07-02-2012   #29
Madhu
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Default The Brazilian saying is right on the money....

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Originally Posted by ganulv View Post
O pas do futuro! E sempre ser. The fact that the term Developing World continues to be used despite decades of evidence to the contrary says more about the nature of belief than it does about the validity of modernization theory, if you ask me.
Anyway,

A medical stability operations curriculum development program exists, apparently, but I know nothing about it. Anyone else know something useful? Bueller? Bueller? (Does anyone under a certain age even recognize the reference?)

Quote:
The Medical Stability Operations Curriculum Development Program (MSOC) was created to develop an educational program for the U.S. Military, United States Governmental (USG) inter-agency partners, and partner and host nations as identified by the geographical Combatant Commands (COCOMs). This program will be a collaboration and partnership between the Uniformed Services University through the Center for Disaster and Humanitarian Assistance Medicine (USU/CDHAM) and Defense Medical Readiness Training Institute (DMRTI)
I don't mean to pick on anyone, but there sure are a lot of different acronym-groupings on that site....

http://www.cdham.org/medical-stabili...t-program-msoc

Last edited by Madhu; 07-02-2012 at 01:36 AM.
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Old 08-01-2012   #30
Madhu
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Default From Zenpundit's Charles Cameron

More on cell phone medicine:

Quote:
Yesterday was my first day at work on my new job with Urb.Im:
http://zenpundit.com/?p=12047


Quote:
M-chanjo: Saving lives by mixing health care with mobile technology

The project's name is M-chanjo, and its aim is to harness the power of mobile phones — ownership of which has increased tenfold over the last ten years in Kenya — to keep patients up to date on their upcoming inoculations and on any outreach programs that are due to take place in the area.
and

Quote:
Ushirika medical clinic, which serves several thousands of people monthly, aims to provide quality and affordable health care to the community members. In addition to the clinic's emphasis on curing illness, its staff also is deeply involved in disease prevention.
http://urb.im/nr/120729mc

I am sure the VA has similar pilot programs? Teaching hospitals in the states are very, very good at some things, but they move at the pace of a snail in terms of envisioning something really radical in terms of the delivery of health care. At least, that's been my experience. Much of it has to do with established stakeholders and the rest with a health care policy literature and attitudes stuck in the mid twentieth century. Like so many others. Just why is there such intellectual stagnation here, there, and everywhere, institutionally speaking? Or am I being unfair?
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Old 08-01-2012   #31
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Default Stagnation?

Madhu asked:
Quote:
Just why is there such intellectual stagnation here, there, and everywhere, institutionally speaking? Or am I being unfair?
This maybe trite, it is alas very accurate: Jack be nimble, Jack be quick.

Curious that the example given is in Kenya, which has started a number of ground-breaking uses of IT, in finance and information sharing, alongside a paucity of public capital and increasing demand for public services.

We in the 'developed' world are rarely nimble, let alone quick. I cannot recall the details now, two sports stadium in London were recently built, one for a public body took years longer than another built for a privately-owned football club.
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Old 11-28-2012   #32
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Default Military Medical Assets as Counterinsurgency Force Multipliers: A Call to Action

Military Medical Assets as Counterinsurgency Force Multipliers: A Call to Action

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Old 11-28-2012   #33
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Default "The Medical Role In Army Stability Operations": COL Neel, Military Medicine (1967)

Military Medical Assets as Counterinsurgency Force Multipliers: A Call to Action

Entry Excerpt:



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Read the full post and make any comments at the SWJ Blog.
This forum is a feed only and is closed to user comments.

Last edited by davidbfpo; 11-28-2012 at 02:58 PM. Reason: Copied here for reference. There are comments on SWJ.
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Old 04-03-2013   #34
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Default Conflict, war and medicine (catch all).

Iraq and Afghanistan through the Lens of American Military Casualties

An important SWJ Blog link that needs to sit here, especially due to the information on casualties.

Last edited by davidbfpo; 04-09-2013 at 10:29 AM. Reason: Copied here and note added
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