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Old 03-25-2014   #681
davidbfpo
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Carl asked:
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Did they ever get the whole story on that attack?
IIRC the official Pakistani report was "leaked" and is within this thread. It was quite damming. Obviously I maybe mistaken.
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Old 03-25-2014   #682
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Originally Posted by carl View Post
Did they ever get the whole story on that attack?
I am assuming they did. I am also assuming we never will.
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Old 03-25-2014   #683
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Default Four Pakistani conspiracy theories that are less fictitious than you'd think

A succinct explanatory comment on WoTR; which ends with:
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Ultimately, the point here is not to legitimize Pakistani conspiracy theories. Rather, it is to highlight how U.S. policies in Pakistan often strengthen—and validate—anti-American narratives that Washington would much prefer to undercut.
Link:http://warontherocks.com/2014/03/fou...an-youd-think/
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Old 03-27-2014   #684
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LOL. I wonder if Mr Kugelman has been picked up by paknationalist psyops yet? His work will be much cited in the days to come. If national security types get credit for citations, this will transform his ratings completely.
I do realize that he means well, but I am not sure what the meaning is supposed to be? what is the lesson here?

Not that it matters. We are about to win a strategic victory (probably with US support as Kerry and company arrange an honorable exit). But as I asked in 2011, what then? What if we win?

http://www.3quarksdaily.com/3quarksd...if-we-win.html
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Old 03-27-2014   #685
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Default The bad guys might make hay, ergo he should remain silent?

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Originally Posted by omarali50 View Post
LOL. I wonder if Mr Kugelman has been picked up by paknationalist psyops yet? His work will be much cited in the days to come.
And? If not his, someone else’s.

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Originally Posted by omarali50 View Post
I do realize that he means well, but I am not sure what the meaning is supposed to be? what is the lesson here?
One lesson would be to keep things in perspective. Don’t sacrifice big picture, long term success at the altar of the crisis of the moment. Anyone who thinks endangering the closing round of decades of work towards eradication of polio from our planet was worth the risk if it meant getting a DNA sample from OBL (talk about risk aversion; were there not multiple lines of evidence that lead the U.S. Intelligence Community to that compound? why the need to nail it down that tightly?) is ignorant or a moron. But this is a nurse’s son speaking here.
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Old 03-27-2014   #686
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On polio I absolutely agree that the CIA should not have added fuel to the anti-polio vax fire, but I would point out that the ban against polio vaccination has been there since 2007, well before poor Dr Afridi and his team of health visitors tried to get DNA. The campaign against polio vaccine started even before the 2007 ban on vaccination in Waziristan. You can read more about the Polio Jihad here: http://www.3quarksdaily.com/3quarksd...lio-jihad.html

I am curious, what do you think was the big picture that was missed in Pakistan?

Again, I would add that I dont think the US did a good job. Far from it. I now think the US was not culturally or institutionally capable of obtaining a really good outcome in the region and would have done much better to stay out. Long distance punishment of hostile governments, support to their enemies and carrots to buy them out would have been cheaper and at least as effective, probably far more so. But the US public wanted a war after 9-11 so there was a war. By now the blood lust has settled, so the whole exercise is looking pointless.
But I dont think the mistakes were the ones Kugelman thinks were mistakes. (To be fair, I am not sure what he thinks. I dont think he has spelled out his "lessons learned" in that article).
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Old 12-08-2014   #687
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Default US transfers Taliban commander to Pakistani custody

As the USA reduces its presence in Afghanistan The Long War Journal's blog has this intriguing story, which starts with:
Quote:
The US military turned over Latif Mehsud, formerly a senior commander in the Movement of the Taliban in Pakistan, to the Pakistani government within the past week. Latif was snatched by US forces from Afghan intelligence officials in the Afghan province of Logar in October 2013.

Just whether as a 'bad' Pakistani Taliban leader he remains in custody is a moot point.
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Old 04-10-2015   #688
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Default US$31 billion later

The following BBC News report acted as a catalyst to post Christine Fair's WoTR piece. Working with Pakistan has hardly gone away!

The BBC headline 'Mumbai attack suspect Lakhvi released on bail in Pakistan', this man has been in custody since 7 December 2008, days after the Mumbai attack:http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-32250763

His detention was reportedly symbolic rather than actual; with LET visitors, internet access and the like. As we know, especially for India, symbols are important.

Christine Fair has a very clear stance on Pakistan, which is critical and the WoTR piece is an effective update:http://warontherocks.com/2015/04/gro.../?singlepage=1

Her aim is:
Quote:
The United States needs a more realistic policy towards Pakistan. In this essay, I argue why these decades-long policies have long failed and I put forward several propositions that should inform a new policy towards a state that is the problem from hell.
She ends:
Quote:
In the end, such a realistic policy towards Pakistan may not result in a Pakistan that behaves better in the policy-relevant future. However such a policy will at least spare the American public the continued indignity of subsidizing Pakistan’s most dangerous policies, several of which account for thousands of dead Americans and many more injured in the Afghan war.
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Old 04-10-2015   #689
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Quote:
His detention was reportedly symbolic rather than actual; with LET visitors, internet access and the like. As we know, especially for India, symbols are important.
David,

Symbols are not important in India.

The dispensation of law as per the criminal code, rules and procedure are.

In India is you are in prison, then you do not get the privileges of the open society at large.

Lakhvi has all facilities of open society available to him while in Jail and he also fathered a child in Jail.

I wonder if that is symbols or miscarriage of justice.

Which country allows a terrorist organiser such facilities?

I am sure none in the West.

The Prosecution, it is said, did not present the case well leaving loopholes that the Pakistani Judges exploited to free this man.
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Old 04-21-2015   #690
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Default Twitter giggles as Pakistan, China launch RANDI think tank

ISLAMABAD:
Chinese President Xi Jinping’s two-day visit to Pakistan has been replete with flowery rhetoric extolling mutual love between both countries, but the name chosen for a new joint think tank has left some social media users in titters.

Dedicated to research on the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor, a $46 billion dollar plan linking China’s restive west to the Arabian Sea, the newly inaugurated Research and Development International (RANDI) organisation has been widely pilloried because its acronym sounds like “whore” in Urdu and Hindi.


http://tribune.com.pk/story/873511/t...di-think-tank/

People are having too much fun at twitter and other fora because of RANDI. Some are assuming that the name is deliberately chosen by the Chinese. Earlier Shireen Mazari, a "security expert" created a think tank called
P.I.S.S(Pakistan Institute of Strategic Studies).
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Old 04-21-2015   #691
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The hashtag #RANDI was number one on Pakistani twitter today, so the joke has been widely shared. English acronym fails have a long history in Pakistan. The first incarnation of the genocidal anti-Shia party "Sepah e Sahaba Pakistan" (soldiers of the (prophet's) companions, Pakistan) was named "Anjuman Sipah e Sahaba" (ASS) "Party of soldiers of the (prophet's) companions".
what is different in this case is that the thing was started as an English language title, not an off-chance weirdness of translation from Urdu to English.
Some people think the Chinese are in on the joke, but of course that too is a joke (Pakistan, like the old Soviet Union, is very joke-happy and there is a joke for every possible political and military development): from what I can tell the Chinese are generally clueless about the cultural nuances of Pakistan (and about Middle eastern societies). So clueless that their imperium may make US imperialism look subtle and deeply knowledgeable..perhaps in the same way that some people look back to the British (with their insatiably curious, astonishingly successful and "proof of the pudding" street-wise "soldier-sahibs") as imperial wizards compared to the easily fooled but highly arrogant Americans.
On the other hand, the Chinese are known to be able to count money, so their actual losses may be less than what the Americans sank into their adventures in imperial policing.
Pakistan has almost certainly promised Big-Big more than Pakistan can possibly deliver. But then again, Big-Big and his accountants may or may not buy the spiel, but they will not sink real money till they see some real returns on early pilot efforts. GHQ will have to up it's game after the first round of investments, otherwise, "you broke it, you pay". Uncle Chin will not extend credit forever...
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Old 05-02-2015   #692
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Default Explaining Pakistan’s Self-Defeating Afghanistan Policy

A short article via the Lawfare blogsite, whose Editor writes:
Quote:
The relationship between Pakistan and Afghanistan has long been ugly. Pakistan’s efforts to control and influence Afghanistan have played a major role in advancing radical groups like the Taliban and fomenting unrest in Pakistan itself. The last few months have seen signs of improvement, but Pakistan’s policies will not be easily changed no matter how self-defeating, as its perceived strategic interests and domestic politics are both intertwined with radical groups. Khalid Nadiri of SAIS explains the logic of Pakistan’s actions in Afghanistan and why a true rapprochement between the two countries is likely to remain elusive.
Link:http://www.lawfareblog.com/2015/04/t...nistan-policy/

The author concludes, optimistically IMHO:
Quote:
In short, matching deeds to words will be a critical requirement for peace in Afghanistan and, by extension, in Pakistan. If Afghanistan is to become stable, it will be a country that maintains active and cordial but independent relations with all of its near and far neighbors and is not used to objectively threaten any other country. In return, Afghanistan’s neighbors would have to refrain from interfering in its internal politics. Such a situation could provide extraordinary economic benefits and open up new political possibilities. Afghanistan and its key partners, including the United States, will need to forge a political formula that provides for regional cooperation. But to get there, Pakistan needs to act in line with its own commitments.
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