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Old 03-28-2017   #161
OUTLAW 09
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ZVEZDA: "All-Seeing" A-50U in action for the first time revealed the latest military flying radar
http://tvzvezda.ru/news/forces/conte...1222-psle.htm#
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Old 03-28-2017   #162
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Planned Russian military exercises near Baltics at same time as Sweden drills sow NATO worries over miscalculations
https://www.wsj.com/articles/planned...es-1490715830#
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Old 03-29-2017   #163
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Russian Ministry of Transport intended to ugrade 8 #Arctic airports, can only afford 2 #Tiksi #Chokurdakh
https://thebarentsobserver.com/en/ar...vuBvk.twitter#
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Old 04-01-2017   #164
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Conscripts will not go to war in Syria. Putin signed a decree on drafting 142,000 people for military service
https://www.pnp.ru/social/2017/03/30...e-poedut.html#
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Old 04-14-2017   #165
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Thanks to a "lurker" and Forum member away from the web for a pointer to this monograph, which is topical: 'Thinking Like a Russian Officer: Factors and Contemporary Thinking on The Nature Of War' by Timothy Thomas, a US Army civilian analyst, an ex-US Army FAO who specialised in Russian/Soviet affairs. It was published in April 2016.
Link:http://fmso.leavenworth.army.mil/doc...%20(final).pdf
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Old 04-18-2017   #166
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Analysis of leaked images of new #Russia Yasen-M Class cruise missile submarine
http://www.hisutton.com/Pr885_Analysis.html#


17 APR: USAF F-22s scrambled from Elmendorf AFB to intercept 2x RUAF Tu-95 100 miles off the coast of Kodiak Island, Alaska
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Old 04-18-2017   #167
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Russian Military Airfields and Communications Objects Around NATO, Ukrainian and Finnish Borders
http://www.numbers-stations.com/mili...nish-borders/#

via @Spy_Stations
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Old 04-28-2017   #168
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Default Shoigu Promotes Russia’s ‘Effective Army’ Plans to 2025

From The Jamestown Foundation: https://jamestown.org/program/shoigu...my-plans-2025/

By Roger McDermott:

Quote:
Russia’s Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu has outlined the country’s military modernization achievements in the context of the ongoing drafting and internal discussion regarding the new State Armaments Program to 2025 (Gosudarstvennaya Programma Vooruzheniya—GPV). Shoigu put forward a vision of greatly enhanced military capabilities, but he has moved beyond simply promising more military hardware and modern systems. Rather, he indicated that, over the next decade, Russia would invest in modernizing and expanding military infrastructure. Despite the country’s economic challenges, it appears that state planning will not downgrade defense spending in favor of other aspects of governmental budgeting. As the drafting of the GPV to 2025 moves into its final stages, following considerable delay, the underlying message is greater emphasis on force multipliers linked to high-technology assets and further expansion of infrastructure (Moskovskiy Komsomolets, April 21).

The GPV to 2025 experienced numerous delays linked to concern over spending levels following the precedent set by the GPV to 2020—which hiked expenditures to 19.3 trillion rubles ($346 billion). The recent suspended animation for the new GPV reflects divisions between the defense and finance ministries (see EDM, September 15, 2016; October 6, 2016), domestic fears that the state cannot afford to continue such investment levels in national defense, as well as a number of related economic and security factors. This general background stems from the downturn in the Russian economy that resulted from declining global oil prices, sanctions imposed on Russia following the annexation of Crimea (with its knock-on impact based on losing access to the Ukrainian defense industry), and the ensuing dispute between the defense and finance ministry. Amidst the GPV drafting process, Russia has been involved in the conflict in Donbas, it deployed forces to the Syrian conflict, and it faces an increasing stand-off with the United States and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). This has meant additional recalibration of the requirements for the GPV to 2025; in other words, the delays are about politics more than economics (see EDM, March 14). The lengthy process will, therefore, only see its final resolution in summer of 2017, with governmental approval scheduled in the fall.

The Russian defense minister stands at the forefront of defending the interests of the military against the arguments by officials in the finance ministry. And Shoigu has used multiple platforms to advance the cause of maintaining realistic levels of defense spending to successfully modernize the Armed Forces. One such platform is the regular meetings of the defense ministry’s collegium. Normally, the collegium has been used to update officials as well as representatives of government bodies, the defense industry, and various interested organizations on the progress made in modernizing the military. But on April 21, Shoigu addressed this body with an eye toward longer-term financial issues. Specifically, he spoke about the completion of state tests of the Admiral Gorshkov frigate, the plan for the Northern Fleet to 2020, the development of ground-based space infrastructure for the Armed Forces, the GPV to 2025, and the success of the new Military Police (Mil.ru, April 21).

Shoigu certainly tried to impress his audience with a number of apposite military statistics to support the theme that the modernization remains highly relevant for Russia: these ranged from numbers of newly formed units to reporting on advances in contract personnel levels. According to Shoigu, earlier this month, the 14th Army Corps was created. The number of contract personnel serving in the Navy reached “95 percent,” with the Ground Forces boosted by 100 percent contract manning of all battalion tactical groups. He also mentioned the aircraft carrier Admiral Kuznetsov and its use in combat operations in Syria. Shoigu noted the first combat use of Russian cruise missiles and said the Navy will be further strengthened by introducing greater numbers of these precision-strike systems. Turning to the GPV to 2025, Shoigu admitted likely budgetary constraints compelling “capital construction,” but he declared that spending will continue to introduce new weaponry and equipment and develop military infrastructure. This effort will involve strengthening the nuclear triad, building more infrastructure, and laying 24,000 kilometers of fiber-optic communication lines. Regarding the latter, he confirmed that the future Russian Army will depend on more high-technology assets and approaches to modern warfare (Mil.ru, April 21).

These themes and their fiscal aspects were explored during an extensive interview by Deputy Defense Minister Tatyana Shevtsova in Voyenno Promyshlennyy Kuryer. “Sequestration” and “budgetary constraints” were much in evidence, but Shevtsova delivered a reassuring message based upon improved planning and greater efficiency in defense planning. In discussing defense sequestration, Shevtsova highlighted the important role played by forming the budget to fulfil the development plans for the Armed Forces, enhancing financial efficiency to implement the “effective army program,” and monitoring the use of the funds to carry out the state defense order. However, the use of monitoring mechanisms and a range of measures to improve the efficiency of fiscal planning and implementation seem to offset any negative impact of small levels of sequestration (Voyenno Promyshlennyy Kuryer, April 19).

Such efficiency themes in Shevtsova’s interview are consistent with many of Shoigu’s public statements, lending credibility to the idea that future defense spending will support ongoing transformation toward a more high-tech force capability. Indeed, given Russia’s positive assessment of its use of cruise missile systems in Syria, the defense ministry has swung behind investing in large numbers of precision-strike systems in the future. Moreover, it has raised the prospect that this will also reduce reliance upon Russia’s nuclear deterrence (Voyenno Promyshlennyy Kuryer, April 19).

Shoigu’s comments also suggest more airfields will be built to support long-range aviation. Naval infrastructure will be similarly boosted. And the Russian military will build greater numbers of precision-strike systems for air and coastal defense as well as to provide more effective offensive capabilities. No outward evidence exists that belt tightening will mitigate Russia’s existing aspirations to build a formidable military capability to meet modern challenges (Lenta.ru, TASS, April 21).

Something quite significant has changed in Russian defense planning and in smoothing out the financial planning features of the state arms procurement agenda; it stems from correcting the historical defense planning deficiency rooted in the absence of military statistics. The defense ministry is in the early stages of correcting this weakness, allowing much greater confidence in planning cycles, spending efficiencies, and monitoring progress in implementing modernization programs. Moscow is becoming smarter in prudent defense spending and planning, with implications for a move away from the former Soviet legacy force and toward a credible and usable force in the future.
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Old 05-01-2017   #169
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Putin's ambitions in the high North—How selfies exposed #Russia's Artic bases. Latest by @Benimmo & @MaksCzuperski:
https://medium.com/dfrlab/selfies-ex...ae-1493192868#

Ah...that Russian Opsec will get them every time.... it seems they have never learned anything from eastern Ukraine and Syria....
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Old 05-19-2017   #170
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TASS: Military and industry discussed the creation of missiles of increased range of "Iskander-M"
http://tass.ru/armiya-i-opk/4266086#

Russians are talking about direct and open INF treaty violation here.

Last edited by OUTLAW 09; 05-19-2017 at 02:22 PM.
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Old 05-19-2017   #171
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OUTLAW 09 View Post
TASS: Military and industry discussed the creation of missiles of increased range of "Iskander-M"
http://tass.ru/armiya-i-opk/4266086#

Russians are talking about direct and open INF treaty violation here.
On the contrary, the Iskander-M's range can be improved while adhering to the INF Treaty. The discussion also revolved around non-range qualitative improvements.
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Old 05-19-2017   #172
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Originally Posted by Azor View Post
On the contrary, the Iskander-M's range can be improved while adhering to the INF Treaty. The discussion also revolved around non-range qualitative improvements.
Depends on exactly what improvements are made to the engine and fuel....one has to wait for the test firings...the question is the last time for another cruise missile test firing the US did not catch the actual firing ....and had to wait until they could clearly get an actual measurement.....which took time

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Old 05-19-2017   #173
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Originally Posted by OUTLAW 09 View Post
Depends on exactly what improvements are made to the engine and fuel....
If it "depends" then why make the leap?
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Old 05-20-2017   #174
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Azor View Post
If it "depends" then why make the leap?
Here is why you never get anything...in the world of cyber security that I work in...the internet is driven by IEEE engineering standards and protocols the language of how things talk to and act with each other....

BUT never think engineering laws applies to everything....when one runs into a major hack and or virus and or a misbehaving internet or network...and a ton of Cisco CCIE's stand around discussing and or whiteboarding the problems...in the end ...mantra "it depends" comes up...meaning depending on what variable you set determines the outcome...you in fact might be seeing.

The military uses the terms "2nd, 3rd or 4th order of effects after a COA has been decided on"....

You can pick which mantra fits your needs...

Last edited by davidbfpo; 05-20-2017 at 11:53 AM. Reason: One of five posts moved here from Ukraine thread
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Old 06-15-2017   #175
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Default Moscow’s Pursuit of Military Strategic Parity With NATO

From the Jamestown Foundation: https://jamestown.org/program/moscow...c-parity-nato/
Publication: Eurasia Daily Monitor Volume: 14 Issue: 79
By: Roger McDermott


Selected Excerpts:

Quote:
Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu promises the arrival of the PAK FA (T-50) fifth-generation fighter jet in 2019 and the new S-500 surface-to-air missile system the following year. Shoigu believes such procurements will help to protect Russia against modern means of aerospace attack. While, Colonel (retired) Viktor Baranets argues that such developments, coupled with other trends in Russia’s military modernization, will offer the country a level of “strategic parity” with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)....

However, such perspectives seem rooted in optimistic defense ministry information campaigns, which explicitly promote an image of a resurgent military well on its way to meeting modern challenges—including any possible threat posed by the United States or NATO. The generally positive publicity for Russian manufactured arms and equipment is certainly doing no harm to arms exports...

...there are persistent and deeper issues at play within the domestic defense industry that no amount of information spin can conceal.

...low level of state investment in research and development (R&D)

Delays to procuring new systems frequently center on the inherent failure to coordinate between the various interested parties, including the defense companies and arms or branches of service that those new assets are earmarked for.

If expensive items, such as the PAK FA or the S-500, are procured in meaningful numbers, properly integrating these systems will require great coordination and effort. At the same time, lingering doubts apparently exist concerning new technologies linked to main battle tanks, with the defense ministry planning to procure modernized older tanks rather than rely exclusively on the new T-14 Armata...

But to extrapolate from this that Russian forces have already reached some level of conventional parity with NATO—or even that they might sometime in the near future—stretches the spin too far.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #176
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Default Russia’s Military Precision Strike Capability Prioritizes Iskander-M

From the Jamestown Foundation: https://jamestown.org/program/russia...es-iskander-m/

Publication: Eurasia Daily Monitor Volume: 14 Issue: 82
By: Roger McDermott
June 20, 2017 09:39 PM Age: 14 hours


Introduction:

Quote:
As Russia’s Armed Forces await the details and specific implications of the new State Armaments Program to 2025 (Gosudarstvennaya Programma Vooruzheniya—GPV), there is widespread expectation that the military will receive more high-precision strike systems to complement its efforts to develop greater operational capabilities (Utro.ru, June 15; see EDM, June 14). Among these, the Iskander-M road-mobile theater ballistic missile system raises serious concerns for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), not least due to its deployment in Kaliningrad and the fact that it is capable of carrying either a conventional or a nuclear warhead. Presently, the Russian defense ministry intends to build enough additional Iskander-Ms to entirely replace the older Tochka-U system by 2020. However, given the further expansion of the Missile Troops (see below), it is likely that more systems will enter service beyond 2020 (RIA Novosti, June 9).
Highlights:
  • Officially there are 10 Missile and Artillery Troop Brigades (RV&A), with another being formed: 4 in the Western MD, 1 in the Southern MD, 2 in the Central MD and 3 in the MEastern MD
  • The RV&A commander notes that there is a trend toward improving Russia’s precision-strike capabilities and that the Iskander-M is a crucial part of this strategy
  • By 2020, all 10 RV&A brigades should be equipped with the Iskander-M, fully replacing the old Tochka-U
  • Iskander-Ms were recently deployed to Tajikistan, and although they may feature in Zapad 2017, Moscow is not planning to sell any to Belarus
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #177
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Azor View Post
On the contrary, the Iskander-M's range can be improved while adhering to the INF Treaty. The discussion also revolved around non-range qualitative improvements.
Those missiles have certainly caused considerable havoc in Yemen for Saudi/UAE forces, somewhere around 500 fatalities based on reports, including some ugly hits of CPs/HQs.

The Russians have developed a lot of formidable weapon system designs on paper that don't make the necessary leap to positive feedback from end users.

But they certainly seem to have done a solid job with that SS-21 Iskander.

And I would guess there could be potential to develop flight profiles that could make interception a real challenge(at drastically reduced range I assume).

It seems like we are finally living the 1950's sci-fi future of rockets fighting rockets.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #178
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flagg View Post
Those missiles have certainly caused considerable havoc in Yemen for Saudi/UAE forces, somewhere around 500 fatalities based on reports, including some ugly hits of CPs/HQs.

The Russians have developed a lot of formidable weapon system designs on paper that don't make the necessary leap to positive feedback from end users.

But they certainly seem to have done a solid job with that SS-21 Iskander.

And I would guess there could be potential to develop flight profiles that could make interception a real challenge(at drastically reduced range I assume).

It seems like we are finally living the 1950's sci-fi future of rockets fighting rockets.
Flagg,

The ballistic missiles used in Yemen are at best Tochkas, and older export variants at that.

See here from Tom Cooper at War is Boring:

http://warisboring.com/how-did-the-h...sile-at-mecca/

https://medium.com/war-is-boring/muc...g-fe178ffbc973
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #179
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Report: Russia may have accidentally revealed new military satellites
http://www.defensenews.com/articles/...ry-satellites#
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