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View Poll Results: What is the near-term future of the DPRK
It will fall into chaos as a result of renewed famine and poverty, resulting in military crackdowns. 3 15.79%
There will be a military coup that displaces the current leadership, hopefully soon. 4 21.05%
It will continue to remain a closed society, technologically dormant and otherwise insignificant. 12 63.16%
The leadership will eventually make a misstep, forcing military action from the United States. 0 0%
Voters: 19. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-24-2016   #501
AdamG
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Moore View Post
The consequences of one nuclear bomb smuggled into a port in a container

The NorKs keep threatening to hit the mainland USA. You don't need a long range missile for that, if you can move the firing platform right up to the target's front stoop.

See http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/dprk/nd-b5.htm

See also http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/wo...rk/missile.htm




See also http://www.strategycenter.net/resear...pub_detail.asp



Just park your cargo ship in with all the others off NOLA, set your fire control system to Remote and look at what you can range.

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Old 04-25-2016   #502
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Default The expanding threat from a nuclear North Korea

I think we get overly focused on missile capabilities due to our tendency to apply mirror analysis and assume our adversaries seek to fight the way we do. Even after the non-traditional attack on our homeland on 9/11 the military-industrial complex as shown little real progress in addressing increasingly dangerous non-conventional threats.

However, that doesn't mean we should ignore missile technology, it may or may not be a red herring in this case, but it still bears watching as these two articles point out. At the end of the day, our adversaries have nuclear weapons, and they can be utilized in various ways to achieve their ends to include with and without missiles.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/...g-on-n/?page=1

The miniaturization myth

Quote:
The public is being misled by the White House, some so-called “experts” and mainstream media casting doubt on whether the Great Leader’s threat is real. They claim North Korea has not demonstrated sufficient “miniaturization” of a nuclear weapon to be delivered by a missile.
Quote:
Technologically, “miniaturizing” a nuclear warhead is much easier than developing an atomic bomb or a multi-stage missile for orbiting satellites — as North Korea has already done.
Quote:
On February 7, North Korea orbited a second satellite, the KSM-4, to join their KSM-3 satellite launched in December 2012.

Both satellites now are in south polar orbits, evading many U.S. missile defense radars and flying over the United States from the south, where our defenses are limited. Both satellites — if nuclear armed — could make an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack that could blackout the U.S. electric grid for months or years, thereby killing millions.
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/...-kor/?page=all

Hyper-proliferation in North Korea
Help from China and Russia makes the situation all the more dangerous

After laying out how the author believes China and Russia are helping North Korea with their nuclear program, he ends with

Quote:
Some of the implications of hyper-proliferation are that Russia and China are part of the problem, not part of the solution; that hyper-proliferation by these actors is a weapon in the New Cold War; and that we should
reassess the nuclear missile threat from other nations of concern — including Pakistan and Iran.
Peter Vincent Pry is executive director of the EMP Task Force on National and Homeland Security and served in the Congressional EMP Commission, the Congressional Strategic Posture Commission, the House Armed Services Committee and the CIA.
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Old 3 Days Ago   #503
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Best Korea must need more free USGovernment cheese.

Quote:
SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea said on Wednesday it had conducted a ballistic missile test that simulated pre-emptive strikes against South Korean ports and airfields used by the U.S. military, a likely reference to the launches of three missiles on Tuesday.

*

Lee Chun-geun, a scientist at South Korea's Science and Technology Policy Institute, said that the North Korean missiles were believed to be carrying warheads, which contain trigger devices but not plutonium or uranium, to see whether those warheads could detonate properly.

The launches were the latest in a series of weapons tests North Korea has carried out since Kim in March ordered tests of a nuclear warhead explosion and ballistic missiles capable of carrying such warheads.
http://www.nbcnews.com/news/north-ko...es-u-s-n613016
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Old 3 Days Ago   #504
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Moore View Post
I think we get overly focused on missile capabilities due to our tendency to apply mirror analysis and assume our adversaries seek to fight the way we do. Even after the non-traditional attack on our homeland on 9/11 the military-industrial complex as shown little real progress in addressing increasingly dangerous non-conventional threats.

However, that doesn't mean we should ignore missile technology, it may or may not be a red herring in this case, but it still bears watching as these two articles point out. At the end of the day, our adversaries have nuclear weapons, and they can be utilized in various ways to achieve their ends to include with and without missiles.
Nothing was said about *just* a missile attack. Depending on who is involved and what their perceived victory conditions are, an attack might involve 1) missile(s) + 2) hacking +3) terror attacks on select targets + 4) infrastructure attacks (see California power grid) and whatever chaos is caused from that equation might be more about hamstringing a US response to a changing situation somewhere else on this globe.
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