SMALL WARS COUNCIL
Go Back   Small Wars Council > Small Wars Participants & Stakeholders > Adversary / Threat

Adversary / Threat One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter. Talk about (or with?) them.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-22-2015   #101
OUTLAW 09
Council Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 35,749
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Moore View Post
WarPorcus,

I'm not sure what statistics you're looking for, but I'll do a search through my computer tomorrow and see what I have for foreign fighter flow from Southeast Asia. A few reports point to several foreign fighters being disillusioned by ISIL's extreme behavior, so hopefully that trend continues. As for Indonesia and the Philippines (similar but still very different), JI and ASG's initial core were foreign fighters from Afghanistan during the USSR occupation. The vast majority of fighters returning that conflict didn't engage in terrorism, but it only takes a handful to have a strategic impact.

We can't compare this to the Crusades where Christians go out and fight and return to their Christian homes, nations that were already somewhat extremist on the Christian side. Fighters today are returning to countries that don't embrace their extreme (and illegitimate) beliefs, so some seek to impose their views via violence. Indonesia from what I can gather from a few short trips there, discussions with experts, and reading is that the government is doing a relatively good job of addressing the concerns of their people (within reason in a developing country), so people aren't fighting because they're being discriminating against. They're fighting to impose their extreme and unpopular beliefs. We're talking Martin L. King freedom marches here (lol).

The Philippines is another issue altogether, since their government does discriminate against their Muslim population. The government does little to address the concerns of their Muslim population, and while President Aquino has a been light of hope, his time is getting short, and not unlike our system their Congress is corrupt and eager to undo much of the progress he has made. I project the situation will devolve for the worse in the Philippines.

Regardless of the conditions on the ground, the terrorists in these countries will reconnect, or strengthen their existing links with global terrorist networks based on foreign fighter flow to support ISIL. That points to a bigger challenge for security forces. I also think those who were repulsed by ISIL may find al-Qaeda more attractive if they're still looking a group to affiliate with. Reportedly, the jihadist websites/blogs in Indonesia contain a fierce internal debate between jihadists on whether to support ISIL or AQ.

For one, I see no reason this will go away in 10 years, but hopefully it can be contained to a manageable level.
Bill--will give you a short story on just how shortsighted the US government, the US IC and just about the entire senior military leadership has been since 1993 when it comes to guerrilla warfare and Islamic insurgents.

Back in 1991-1993 when the US Army had a light infantry fighting division the 7th they came to our Reserve Intel Center near the Presidio and asked if we could design a "guerrilla/insurgent scenario" for them to train all non intel types in their BN staffs for the whole division--they picked this as it was similar to their Panama mission and their general outlook on how they were going to be used in the future.

And presto the 7th "disappeared" after the training was completed as we were in the "peace dividend drawdown" and there were going to be "no future needs for a light infantry division focused on UW/guerrilla warfare".

I together with a great Order of battle Tech (which "disappeared as well) then took the NEO for the Philippines and designed a complete 10 day scenario around no other than Abu Sayyaf who many at that time had heard not much from--we built then a robust guerrilla scenario focusing on driving staff functions designed to first detect what actually was ongoing, define the players and human terrain, design a info war messaging and then design a robust military response using light fighters coupled with Philippino military while protecting the civilian populations as much as possible.

After 10 days the staffs were exhausted but they had developed into a solid C-UW thinking team and had now a far deeper understanding of guerrilla warfare than when they came to us.

Fort Huachuca wanted a complete copy of the scenario and over 3000 messages as this was the day of the 289 computers and all was done by hand and typewriter.

THEN suddenly after they reviewed it--came the following "we anticipate no future guerrilla warfare or UW conflicts" and thanks for the efforts and it was canned somewhere in the depths of Ft. H.

Now 23 years later we are facing again what and where?? What a wasted 23 years when some truly saw what was coming at us over the horizon and the political and military leadership felt "peace was forever".

Remember it was the Philippines where we lost a truly great former SF officer/VN POW COL Rowe (remember this was 1989) in an out right assassination- who by the way knew it was coming as he called his wife the evening before to check on "legal things "and said goodbye something he had never done--and by the way that assassination was never fully investigated and had it's ties to the Islamic side of the house and some say the KGB. They had fired into what was later proven to be the only weak point in the armored glass which reflected someone knew our armored glass production and deficiencies.

It was there in 1993 for all to see--just no one wanted to seriously connect the dots to include the IC.

This fight has been with us since the very early 80s and it is not going away any time soon and the guesses of within the next 20 years is also wrong since the fight has been on since 1979 beginning with the name called Khomeini.

Last edited by OUTLAW 09; 03-22-2015 at 08:57 AM.
OUTLAW 09 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015   #102
Bill Moore
Council Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,972
Default

Outlaw 09,

I have painful memories of the 90s, and it wasn't just the conventional military that ignored the hard lessons related to irregular warfare. Special Forces officers were falling over themselves to demonstrate to their senior leaders that they were more conventional than the conventional army, because unconventional warfare was dead. Officers that today claim they always supported unconventional warfare, were the same ones fighting to kill our advanced HUMINT training (why would we need that?), kill our advanced urban warfare training, a few were even advocating killing our sniper program and SERE training (which actually taught you a lot about modern warfare), they killed our operations and intelligence course, which as you know was key was key to developing our future team sergeants (backbone of the ODA), got read of the Assistant Operations Sergeant position, in exchange for a specialized intelligence sergeant, they quit sending guys to advanced demolitions training, and on and on. Fortunately a few diehards resisted the dumbest proposed changes, but it didn't serve their careers well.

This mind set was based on the perceived need to conventionalize SF because UW was dead. It took a war and few years of it to get our heads right. Speaking of great leaders, I remember COL Nick Rowe well (I had the honor of him appointing me just before he went to the Philippines). He was one of the great ones, and his field of expertise went well beyond SERE. SF is making a come back, but it took a lot longer than it should have. Now that the wars have ended , we may be at risk of turning the clock back to 1994 or so.
Bill Moore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015   #103
OUTLAW 09
Council Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 35,749
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Moore View Post
Outlaw 09,

I have painful memories of the 90s, and it wasn't just the conventional military that ignored the hard lessons related to irregular warfare. Special Forces officers were falling over themselves to demonstrate to their senior leaders that they were more conventional than the conventional army, because unconventional warfare was dead. Officers that today claim they always supported unconventional warfare, were the same ones fighting to kill our advanced HUMINT training (why would we need that?), kill our advanced urban warfare training, a few were even advocating killing our sniper program and SERE training (which actually taught you a lot about modern warfare), they killed our operations and intelligence course, which as you know was key was key to developing our future team sergeants (backbone of the ODA), got read of the Assistant Operations Sergeant position, in exchange for a specialized intelligence sergeant, they quit sending guys to advanced demolitions training, and on and on. Fortunately a few diehards resisted the dumbest proposed changes, but it didn't serve their careers well.

This mind set was based on the perceived need to conventionalize SF because UW was dead. It took a war and few years of it to get our heads right. Speaking of great leaders, I remember COL Nick Rowe well (I had the honor of him appointing me just before he went to the Philippines). He was one of the great ones, and his field of expertise went well beyond SERE. SF is making a come back, but it took a lot longer than it should have. Now that the wars have ended , we may be at risk of turning the clock back to 1994 or so.
Bill--the best school I had in SF in 1966 was the lock and key course at Fort Holabird as a part of O&I and then it was onto the worst misery--six weeks at the Jungle School Panama (although only a few worn the Jungle Warfare patch in those days)--the second best was night navigation in Tunisia with no compass and just the stars.

Advanced demo/ADM I got at Bragg before leaving for Berlin and while in Berlin I thought I had joined OSS from 1945 when it came to advanced demo techniques.

We bit the bullet and did all the courses in those days as it was part and parcel of SF then following the mantra you never know when you will need it as SF in those days was truly UW focused---the changes starting hitting SF in late 72 early 73 as the draw down from VN as ongoing and the conventional mindset was still there when I came back in 1986 on a volunteer tour until 1991. Face it in 1972/73 the Conventional Forces senior leadership were literally gunni
ng to do in SF for once and for all times.

With one exception--COL Jesse Johnson the 10th Commander allowed me to run a C-UW mission set during the last Reforger in Germany before the Wall came down using the Soviet counter SF doctrine that I had been privy to while in Berlin. He was seriously interested in could a Soviet counter SF doctrine actually work and we proved the point that it could.

I had a Ranger Company and infantry support to control the largest Reforger AO and using Soviet doctrine complete with dogs and speaker teams--the one that gave Noriega a hard time in the Vatican embassy-- we held out extremely well against 10 SOF teams from various services and countries until told to surrender the AO.

So while guerrilla warfare is old and proven and really only the technology changes--wish people would fully understand that when talking about Russian/Chinese/Iranian non linear warfare--there are some serious surprises that need to be looked at.

Last edited by OUTLAW 09; 03-22-2015 at 03:56 PM.
OUTLAW 09 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015   #104
davidbfpo
Council Member
 
davidbfpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 11,164
Default Has the global jihad changed, should we?

The Soufan Group publish a free e-newsletter and so far they have been of interest. This week came this short comment:http://soufangroup.com/tsg-intelbrie...-global-jihad/

The opening two passages:
Quote:
As the tragedy in Tunis shows, the realities of the new terror spectacular of low-scale attacks with large-scale reactions—carried out by malevolent actors driven by motivation as much as affiliation—have pushed away the responsibility of effective counterterrorism from national agencies down to local police and security The age of large-scale international intervention into conflict areas has passed for the moment and the battlefield is shifting back from war zones to disaffected neighborhoods—forcing intelligence agencies to work extremely closely with local police to disrupt known wolves of terror instead of documenting their crimes after the fact

I do think the era of containment overseas maybe evolving, although without any clear direction. Just whether staying alert at home and simply being better pre-attack intervention is a moot point.
__________________
davidbfpo
davidbfpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015   #105
Bill Moore
Council Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,972
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by davidbfpo View Post
The Soufan Group publish a free e-newsletter and so far they have been of interest. This week came this short comment:http://soufangroup.com/tsg-intelbrie...-global-jihad/

The opening two passages:


I do think the era of containment overseas maybe evolving, although without any clear direction. Just whether staying alert at home and simply being better pre-attack intervention is a moot point.
I read the short article and frankly was disappointed that so many senior analysts could come to this conclusion.

Quote:
The age of large-scale international intervention into conflict areas has passed for the moment and the battlefield is shifting back from war zones to disaffected neighborhoods—forcing intelligence agencies to work extremely closely with local police to disrupt known wolves of terror instead of documenting their crimes after the fact.
Before and since 9/11 there have been several terrorist attacks outside war zones, so to assume the recent attack in Tunisia represents a turning point seems a bit odd. To assume there are no longer any war zones discounts the major war zones in Syria, Iraq, Yemen, Nigeria, and Libya. I see little new in the character of Islamist terrorism other than its mindless escalation in violence, especially violence directed against other Muslims. Countering the threat will continue to require military, diplomatic, law enforcement, and informational efforts.
Bill Moore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015   #106
davidbfpo
Council Member
 
davidbfpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 11,164
Default An alternative Soufan text

Bill,

I did wonder if the Soufan conclusion reflected their own expertise as a commercial provider of expertise.

Citing that one passage again:
Quote:
The age of large-scale international intervention into conflict areas has passed for the moment and the battlefield is shifting back from war zones to disaffected neighborhoods—forcing intelligence agencies to work extremely closely with local police to disrupt known wolves of terror instead of documenting their crimes after the fact.
It would have made more sense if had stated:

The age of large-scale Western international intervention into conflict areas has passed for now, unless an attack akin to 9/11 happens. Instead of a battlefield where the West dominates the emphasis will be on local and regional responses to violence. In many places violence occurs in less governed spaces e..g. the Sahel and for many societies the competition with jihadists is in their disaffected urban neighborhoods. The identification of attackers, whether 'lone wolves' or groups, will come from the joint work of intelligence agencies and local police. Retaining community support is vital - they may even help!
__________________
davidbfpo
davidbfpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2015   #107
OUTLAW 09
Council Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 35,749
Default

LTG (R) Mike Flynn @MTPFLYNN

Should Islam Be Reformed; So says a former Muslim who believes the religion she's rejected is completely corrupted.

http://www.newsmax.com/t/newsmax/article/631746
OUTLAW 09 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2015   #108
davidbfpo
Council Member
 
davidbfpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 11,164
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by OUTLAW 09 View Post
LTG (R) Mike Flynn @MTPFLYNN
Should Islam Be Reformed; So says a former Muslim who believes the religion she's rejected is completely corrupted.

http://www.newsmax.com/t/newsmax/article/631746
Ayaan Hirsi Ali was on the BBC last night explaining her stance. It is hard to think of a person less likely to be listened to by Muslims than her, an openly declared atheist and awhile ago a Muslim who recanted her faith. Being a best-selling author, appearing on TV and courting controversy is IMHO hardly a recipe for Muslims to listen.
__________________
davidbfpo
davidbfpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015   #109
OUTLAW 09
Council Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 35,749
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by davidbfpo View Post
Ayaan Hirsi Ali was on the BBC last night explaining her stance. It is hard to think of a person less likely to be listened to by Muslims than her, an openly declared atheist and awhile ago a Muslim who recanted her faith. Being a best-selling author, appearing on TV and courting controversy is IMHO hardly a recipe for Muslims to listen.
But her book carries a massive statement centered on the Muslim community as a whole.

There has been coming out of Sisi in Egypt a similar plea lately.
OUTLAW 09 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015   #110
OUTLAW 09
Council Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 35,749
Default

Bill M--someone is seeing the light finally in the Philippines.

Philippine President Benigno Aquino called on lawmakers Friday to pass a bill endorsing a pact aimed at ending a decades-long Muslim separatist rebellion, warning them they would otherwise start counting "body bags".

Aquino had wanted the bill, which would give autonomy to the majority Catholic nation's Muslim minority in the south, passed this month.
But Congress suspended debates on the proposed law in the face of public outrage over the killings of 44 police commandoes by Muslim guerrillas in a botched anti-terror raid in January.

The Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), which signed a peace deal a year ago Friday, had said its members fired in self-defence at the commandoes, who passed through a rebel camp while going after Islamic militants.

"This is the crossroads we face: we take pains to forge peace today, or we count body bags tomorrow," Aquino said in a nationwide television address.
"Perhaps it is easy for you to push for all-out war," he said, hitting out at critics who have condemned the peace deal with the MILF.
"But if the conflict grows, the number of Filipinos shooting at other Filipinos will grow, and it would not be out of the question that a friend or loved one be one of the people who will end up inside a body bag."

The rebellion for a separate state or self-rule has claimed nearly 120,000 lives and cost billions of dollars in economic losses, according to government estimates.
Under a peace deal signed with the MILF, the 10,000-member group pledged to disarm while the Philippine government vowed to pass an autonomy law in Muslim areas of the south.

"The Bangsamoro basic law is one of the most important proposed bills of our administration. It answers the two most pressing problems of our countrymen: poverty and violence," Aquino said Friday.
He warned it would be difficult to restart peace talks if the current process failed and the MILF leadership lost its influence among its members to more radical elements.
Aquino is required by the constitution to stand down in mid-2016 after serving a single six-year term.

The January police raid sought to capture or kill two men on the US government's list of "most wanted terrorists" who were living among Muslim rebels in southern Philippine farming communities.
One of the men, Malaysian national Zulkifli bin Hir who had a $5-million bounty on his head, was reported killed.
But the other, Filipino Abdul Basit Usman, escaped as rebels surrounded and killed the police commandoes.

Last edited by davidbfpo; 03-27-2015 at 11:45 PM. Reason: Copied to the main Phillipines thread
OUTLAW 09 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015   #111
davidbfpo
Council Member
 
davidbfpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 11,164
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by OUTLAW 09 View Post
But her book carries a massive statement centered on the Muslim community as a whole.

There has been coming out of Sisi in Egypt a similar plea lately.
Outlaw09,

Calls for Islam to be reformed from outside maybe listened to by some within. I doubt many will listen to Ayaan Hirsi Ali and a good number will regard General Sisi's statements as self-serving, as he tries to reduce the impact "political Islam" has on Egyptians.
__________________
davidbfpo
davidbfpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2015   #112
davidbfpo
Council Member
 
davidbfpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 11,164
Default Why Islam doesn’t need a reformation

Medhi Hassan has a long commentary on this call, in part raised by non-Muslims, notably the atheist Ayaan Hirsi Ali (cited before):http://www.theguardian.com/commentis...luther-europe?

Here are two passages:
Quote:
Don’t get me wrong. Reforms are of course needed across the crisis-ridden Muslim-majority world: political, socio-economic and, yes, religious too. Muslims need to rediscover their own heritage of pluralism, tolerance and mutual respect – embodied in, say, the Prophet’s letter to the monks of St Catherine’s monastery....



What they don’t need are lazy calls for an Islamic reformation from non-Muslims and ex-Muslims, the repetition of which merely illustrates how shallow and simplistic, how ahistorical and even anti-historical, some of the west’s leading commentators are on this issue. It is much easier for them, it seems, to reduce the complex debate over violent extremism to a series of cliches, slogans and soundbites, rather than examining root causes or historical trends; easier still to champion the most extreme and bigoted critics of Islam while ignoring the voices of mainstream Muslim scholars, academics and activists.
__________________
davidbfpo
davidbfpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2015   #113
davidbfpo
Council Member
 
davidbfpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 11,164
Default Ayaan Hirsi Ali: you're wrong

A short detailed rebuttal of the arguments of Ayaan Hirsi Ali from Will McCants @ Brookings, which IMHO is devasting. Here is his opening paragraph:
Quote:
Ayaan Hirsi Ali is correct that darker passages of Islamic Scripture endorse violence and prescribe harsh punishments for moral or theological infractions. And she is right that in many Muslim countries, too many citizens still think it is a good idea to kill people for apostasy, stone them for adultery, and beat women for disobedience just because Scripture says so. But Hirsi Ali is profoundly wrong when she argues that Islamic Scripture causes Muslim terrorism and thus that the U.S. government should fund Muslim dissidents to reform Islam.
Link and not behind a paywall:https://www.foreignaffairs.com/artic...re-not-problem
__________________
davidbfpo
davidbfpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-29-2016   #114
davidbfpo
Council Member
 
davidbfpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 11,164
Default Studying German fighters

From ICSR a short commentary after an official German publication, which they explain as:
Quote:
The German security authorities recently published a new study that brings together information on 677 individuals who departed Germany for Syria or Iraq before June 30, 2015.

The analysis is based on data provided by the German police and domestic intelligence agencies both at the federal and state level. It was jointly conducted by the Bundeskriminalamt (the Federal Criminal Police Agency), the Bundesamt fr Verfassungsschutz (the Federal Domestic Intelligence Service), and the Hessian Centre of Information and Expertise on Extremism, and released by the Permanent Conference of the Ministers of the Interior of the Lnder.
According to the German authorities, more than 800 people have left Germany for Syria or Iraq since the beginning of the Syrian conflict, though it is not possible to verify that they all reached the region. Around one third of the departees is known or assumed to have returned to Germany, of whom 70 are thought to have experienced armed combat with Islamic State, or at least undergone military training. About 130 Islamists from Germany are presumed to have been killed in the conflict.
This ICSR Insight highlights some of the other findings.
Link:http://cache.nebula.phx3.secureserve...ZhMmJkYmY6Ojo6
__________________
davidbfpo
davidbfpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2016   #115
davidbfpo
Council Member
 
davidbfpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 11,164
Default Terror threat grows more random by the day

In part prompted by recent "lone wolf" and other terrorist attacks, this wide-ranging thought piece by Raffaello Pantucci is worth a read:https://raffaellopantucci.com/2016/0...om-by-the-day/
__________________
davidbfpo

Last edited by davidbfpo; 06-18-2016 at 11:17 PM. Reason: 8,347v
davidbfpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2016   #116
Azor
Council Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 801
Default To David

I am responding to your 2 most recent posts from this week...

I broadly agree that the solution to Islamic terrorism is not a Western-originated top-down reform of Islamic texts and practices. Certainly there are texts in Judaism and Christianity that can be used to justify aggressive violence against non-Christians and Christians deemed heretical. Moreover, the Christian Reformation and Counter-Reformation were not struggles for tolerance and peace, but violent struggles driven by fanatics.

Yet we must also acknowledge that people identifying as Muslims and acting on behalf of Islam are committing atrocities in Western countries against non-Muslims. Taken into a global context, the statistics indicate that wherever Muslims and non-Muslims exist in the same country, there is inter-communal violence. Nor do non-Muslim minorities in Muslim-majority countries ever not face oppression, whether in the 8th Century or 21st Century.

In the United States, since 9/11, Muslim terrorists have killed 105 people and wounded hundreds. Yet Muslim Americans constitute only 1% of the population. In comparison, anti-Muslim attacks have killed 17, of which 10 were non-Muslims mistakenly identified. We hear about Islamophobia, but if non-Muslim and Muslim Americans had the same propensity toward violence toward one another, we would see either much greater anti-Muslim killings or far less killings by Muslims.

We are told that diversity enriches Western countries, yet I fail to see what good Islam gives us that cannot be gained from other non-Muslim immigrants. As for the bad, well, that is what keeps the FBI, MI5, et al, up at night.

The problem is Islamic Supremacism. It does not matter whether it is endorsed in the Quran or by the local Imam, or not. Individuals and groups of individuals are drawn to it either due to their cultural backgrounds or because of its anti-Western revolutionary counter-culture "credentials", as it seems to have supplanted the lure of Fascism and Revolutionary Socialism.

Unlike in Northern Ireland, where the political solution involved the deconstruction of Loyalist Protestant supremacy, and equality rather than independence or union with Ireland, I fail to see what political solution is possible for Islamic Supremacism.

Supposedly Muslims are entitled to freedom of religion, but what about freedom of ideology, which is all religion is? We don't allow "practising Nazis", now do we?
Azor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2016   #117
slapout9
Council Member
 
slapout9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 4,811
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Azor View Post
I am responding to your 2 most recent posts from this week...

I broadly agree that the solution to Islamic terrorism is not a Western-originated top-down reform of Islamic texts and practices. Certainly there are texts in Judaism and Christianity that can be used to justify aggressive violence against non-Christians and Christians deemed heretical. Moreover, the Christian Reformation and Counter-Reformation were not struggles for tolerance and peace, but violent struggles driven by fanatics.

Yet we must also acknowledge that people identifying as Muslims and acting on behalf of Islam are committing atrocities in Western countries against non-Muslims. Taken into a global context, the statistics indicate that wherever Muslims and non-Muslims exist in the same country, there is inter-communal violence. Nor do non-Muslim minorities in Muslim-majority countries ever not face oppression, whether in the 8th Century or 21st Century.

In the United States, since 9/11, Muslim terrorists have killed 105 people and wounded hundreds. Yet Muslim Americans constitute only 1% of the population. In comparison, anti-Muslim attacks have killed 17, of which 10 were non-Muslims mistakenly identified. We hear about Islamophobia, but if non-Muslim and Muslim Americans had the same propensity toward violence toward one another, we would see either much greater anti-Muslim killings or far less killings by Muslims.

We are told that diversity enriches Western countries, yet I fail to see what good Islam gives us that cannot be gained from other non-Muslim immigrants. As for the bad, well, that is what keeps the FBI, MI5, et al, up at night.

The problem is Islamic Supremacism. It does not matter whether it is endorsed in the Quran or by the local Imam, or not. Individuals and groups of individuals are drawn to it either due to their cultural backgrounds or because of its anti-Western revolutionary counter-culture "credentials", as it seems to have supplanted the lure of Fascism and Revolutionary Socialism.

Unlike in Northern Ireland, where the political solution involved the deconstruction of Loyalist Protestant supremacy, and equality rather than independence or union with Ireland, I fail to see what political solution is possible for Islamic Supremacism.

Supposedly Muslims are entitled to freedom of religion, but what about freedom of ideology, which is all religion is? We don't allow "practising Nazis", now do we?

Well said!
slapout9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2016   #118
davidbfpo
Council Member
 
davidbfpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 11,164
Default Radicals are exploiting a common misunderstanding of sharia.

I think this article by a SWC member fits here:http://nationalinterest.org/feature/...errorism-16409
__________________
davidbfpo
davidbfpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2016   #119
SWJ Blog
Council Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 10,789
Default Flow of Foreign Fighters Plummets as Islamic State Loses its Edge

Flow of Foreign Fighters Plummets as Islamic State Loses its Edge

Entry Excerpt:



--------
Read the full post and make any comments at the SWJ Blog.
This forum is a feed only and is closed to user comments.
SWJ Blog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2016   #120
SWJ Blog
Council Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 10,789
Default Then and Now: Comparing the Flow of Foreign Fighters to AQI and the Islamic State

Then and Now: Comparing the Flow of Foreign Fighters to AQI and the Islamic State

Entry Excerpt:



--------
Read the full post and make any comments at the SWJ Blog.
This forum is a feed only and is closed to user comments.
SWJ Blog is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
academic, coin, coin theory, conference, counterterrorism, denmark, fighters, foreign fighters, gwot, idf, insurgency, israel, jihad, military service, norway, radicalisation, radicalization, syria, terrorism, terrorists, ussocom

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 07:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9. ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Registered Users are solely responsible for their messages.
Operated by, and site design © 2005-2009, Small Wars Foundation