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Old 05-02-2017   #21
Azor
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Default Updates from Syria Liveuamap

  • Leaked video purports to show YPG/SDF forces in Raqqa countryside going into civilian houses looking to loot/steal, Raqqa Governorate, Syria
  • Clashes between the Free Syrian Army and the YPG/SDF on the axis of A'zaz -Maranaz, north of Aleppo

Turkish-YPG Fighting
  • Turkish artillery pounding YPG positions in Afrin with artillery
  • Howitzers and T-122 Sakarya MLRS is reportedly pounding YPG positions in Afrin

Perhaps Washington will come to the realization that there are no angels here, except the White Helmets.

Neither the YPG nor the FSA should be fighting in Sunni Arab and Kurdish areas, respectively, and any operations in mixed areas should come under strict joint oversight to prevent cleansing.

Last edited by Azor; 05-02-2017 at 01:14 AM.
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Old 05-02-2017   #22
OUTLAW 09
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Meh. This is like trying to stay out of a barroom brawl but just get a few kicks in on one of the brawlers. It doesn't work. Either you go in with some friends and a chair, or you stay out of it and sip a beer while you watch.

BUT when you pick the wrong bar...the wrong friends...have no chair and no beer...will you then realize you might in one heck of a serious problem....THIS is where SOF and CENTCOM are now and yet I do not think they even realize it...

AND that is sad....

Maybe if they read SWC/SWJ more often????
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Old 05-02-2017   #23
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Everyone wants to have their own Holocaust it seems whilst denying the real one that took place.
Should this be an attempt to explain I'm denying the Holocaust (of Jews, Roma and few other ethnic and religious, as well as political groups, and by German Nazis and allies in 1930s and 1940s), our exchange is herewith over.
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Old 05-02-2017   #24
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Another wiki-leaks affair: Somebody stole the super-modern, ultra-secret digital map of Syria, used by the CENTCOM for its operations there - and posted it on the internet....
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Old 05-02-2017   #25
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This is a post especially for all the fans of Brigadier-General Sohail 'Botox' Hussein. While reading it, please turn on this music (right-click, please): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGuNsiSZ9RI

One of visitors of the ACIG forum has recently drawn my attention at an increasing number of photographs showing Assadist Brig-Gen Sohail 'Botox' Hussein...'escorted'... by young, or at least cleanly shaven, 'pretty'... well, boys.

I've seen 1-2 of these too, but didn't pay attention early on, and thus wasn't aware how many are meanwhile circulating the internet. Nor, actually, that a few of the boys in question are around him all the time - or that Hussein is clearly showing his predilection for such...ahem... 'visitors'. That aside, my standpoint is that everybody is free to do whatever he/she likes to do in his off time. So, why care?

But then, our visitor made me aware of the 'practice' of 'powerful men' having 'sex with pretty boys' being quite widespread in the Middle East, and not even considered as 'homosexuality'. Apparently, even some very religious men do it, whether in Syria, or Iran, even in Afghanistan (apparently, even some US servicemen reported receiving sexual advances while serving in Iraq and Afghanistan).

Anyway... Sohail 'Botox' Hassan seems to have an entire group - i.e. a 'harem' - of 'pretty boys' around him nearly all of time. And, since the internet is meanwhile flooded with... loving images of him in their company... well: why not post a collection of at least a few of them?

Here something like 'Best of Botox Hussein and his Harem'... with love,

(...uuuu-uuuuu-uuuu....)
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Old 05-02-2017   #26
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Should this be an attempt to explain I'm denying the Holocaust (of Jews, Roma and few other ethnic and religious, as well as political groups, and by German Nazis and allies in 1930s and 1940s), our exchange is herewith over.
You forgot to include Polish and Soviet civilians and prisoners of war.

Often you will find that the same people claiming a "Holocaust" of women (witch trials), Arabs (by Europeans and later Israelis), and Native Americans (by Europeans, Americans and Canadians), seem to want to refute some or all aspects of the Shoah.

For instance, Russians have inflated the number of Soviet civilians and POWs who were mass murdered by the Germans, by including non-Soviet victims as well as those of Stalin's brutality, which continued unabated throughout the war. Russians have then taken the Soviet total and claimed it as a Russian total. Yet Holocaust denial and anti-Semitism abounds in Russia, and no effort is made to recognize the greater suffering of Belorussians, Ukrainians and Kazakhs, or Russia's own genocides against non-Russians.

There is a race among the groups of the living to make claims upon the dead - real and imagined - whilst denying other groups their own claims.

Do you truly think that I am accusing you of Holocaust denial? Or are you looking for an excuse to disengage?

What I am accusing you of is playing fast and loose with the history of mass murder, purely to deflect from a series of genocides perpetrated by the Turks in the 20th Century, which continue in the form of low-level war.
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Old 05-02-2017   #27
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Originally Posted by CrowBat
Anyway...Sohail 'Botox' Hassan seems to have an entire group - i.e. a 'harem' - of 'pretty boys' around him nearly all of time. And, since the internet is meanwhile flooded with...loving images of him in their company... well: why not post a collection of at least a few of them?
Nothing wrong with that. You may also recall the quirks of such previous warlords as General Butt Naked in Liberia. These characters would be laughable if they weren't so lethal...

As homosexuality no longer exists in Iran according to its former president and various crane operators, perhaps it still does in Syria?
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Old 05-02-2017   #28
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Nothing wrong with that. You may also recall the quirks of such previous warlords as General Butt Naked in Liberia. These characters would be laughable if they weren't so lethal...

As homosexuality no longer exists in Iran according to its former president and various crane operators, perhaps it still does in Syria?
Definitively alive and well in AFG and Iraq...
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Old 05-02-2017   #29
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Carpet bombings by #Kremlin regime war planes on #Hama towns today.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZpp...ture=youtu.be#

At Merkel presser, #Putin called it "ceasefire".

Putin says he doesn't interfere in domestic affairs of other countries.

AND as Syria and eastern Ukraine continue to be in a deep war...we have the American FP bogged down in a debate on the "Civil war"?????

TRUMP (yesterday): I would've used my dealmaking skills to prevent the Civil War

TRUMP (today): I can't get anything through a GOP Congress


YET after his "red line" TLAM strike..he has done nothing more in Syria....

Russian MoD denies @hrw report that Soviet-era bombs were used in chemical attack, says not 1 Western inspector has visited site in Syria.
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Old 05-02-2017   #30
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Syria: after these advances Western/Jordanian backed rebels have entered #DeirEzzor governorate from the SW, controlling most of the desert

Syria: Maghaweer al-Thawra (#FSA) rebels have captured Jabal Ghrab, wadi Swab, Muayzilah & the T3 Pumping station in the Syrian desert

Hama : Regime barrel bomb massacre in #Latmenah as a mother, father and four children were killed by a helicopter.
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Old 05-02-2017   #31
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Afrin today.

#Kremlin regime soldiers patrolling with #PKK-affiliated fighters.

Putin's middle finger to Erdogan, one day before the visit.
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Old 05-02-2017   #32
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Default To CrowBat RE: Blockade/NFZ/NDZ

Quote:
Originally Posted by CrowBat
After Gorbachev stopped the military cooperation with Syria, and stopped all the arms deliveries too, in 1988, Damascus stopped paying all debts to the USSR, rumoured at between US15 and 17 billion. From 1988 until today, Syrians didn't pay a single cent of that debt back to Moscow.
According to SIPRI, Russia provided more than 50% of the value of the arms transferred to Syria from 1992 to 2013, with data being scarce for 2014 and unavailable for 2015-2015. Russia was the single largest transferor in 2002-2003 and 2009-2013, or for one third of that period. Has the Syrian account been up to date? Certainly not. But such is the cost of doing business in the arms trade, and neither Yeltsin nor Putin have had problems providing corporate welfare to Russian defense contractors.

With regard to Tartus, it is effectively a glorified dock. Russia has been unable to even thinly spread its assets across its existing bases, let alone take advantage of naval facilities in Syria and Vietnam. Recently, the Russian Navy had to cannibalize its Black Sea Fleet to reinforce its Baltic Fleet, and deploying the naval group off of Syria has been a strain.

As stated previously, I referred to “client” in a very loose sense given that Russia’s international relationships are far fewer and far weaker than those of the United States, and I won’t belabor the point further.

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Originally Posted by CrowBat
How often have the Russians violated the airspace of any NATO country with their IFF-transponders off since that ROE was introduced, back in 2015? How do you provide proofs for 0?
What new ROEs have been introduced? Thus far Russia has offered to turn transponders on if all NATO aircraft (i.e. spy planes) will do likewise.

In 2017, there were at least six incidents of Russian military aircraft flying in international Baltic airspace with their transponders off.

In 2016, there were 110 intercepts in the Baltic area, including at least four where Russian transponders were off, and six violations of Estonian airspace. In addition, there were ten violations of Bulgarian airspace and at least one unsafe interception by Russia over the Black Sea. NATO intercepts were lower for 2016 than 2014 and 2015, but are still far above 2013 levels.

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…it's simply silly to insinuate whatever kind of 'what ifs' about a country with the GNP of Spain and its ability to challenge the USA in an open military confrontation. Even more so in an area 2000 kilometres away from its borders, where it has NO bases, nor even any true allies.
Well, Russia may be “Upper Volta”, but it still has “rockets”, does it not? This country has directly challenged American interests since 2008, and has invaded and partitioned two prospective American allies.

Regardless, you continue to have difficulty reading what I actually write. I never said that Russia would attack American or Coalition forces in Syria. What I did assert was that Russia probably would ignore a no-fly zone, no-drive zone and/or a blockade, and dare the Coalition to fire on it first. Despite lacking true allies, Russia would certainly have allies of convenience in Damascus and Teheran.

Consider the Berlin Airlift, when American and British forces were faced with overwhelming Soviet quantitative and qualitative superiority, frayed lines of communication and only perhaps two dozen atomic bombs were available to the U.S. once the B-29s had been deployed. The Allies violated the blockade peacefully, adhered to pre-blockade arrangements as much as possible, and were prepared to lose men and machines to Soviet aggression and the weather, if need be. The airlift was a logistical feat for the British and French, and humiliated the far stronger Soviet Union.

After the fall of Qaddafi and the refusal of Obama to treat him as an equal partner, Putin has been determined to humiliate the U.S. despite Russia’s weaknesses. Were the U.S. to establish a blockade or NFZ/NDZ, I believe that Putin would move heaven and earth to violate it and risk the lives of Russian sailors and pilots doing so.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CrowBat
Assad's air force is grounded, and he realizes he's left without troops to continue the war - which is why Iran launched its military intervention in Syria, in 2012. So what?
And? It all boils down to whether the U.S. would fire upon Russian and Iranian blockade runners.

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Originally Posted by CrowBat
Tehran concluded this already in 2011. Moscow didn't care until July 2015. As of 2013, neither was in a position to do anything about this.
Of course Moscow cared. It just had bigger fish to fry. Assuming that the blockade did not include airstrikes on Assad’s ground forces, it would have taken the rebels some time to defeat Assad, during which Moscow and Teheran could have tried to run men and materiel through the blockade, by air, sea and overland through Iraq, which was not exactly an American ally in 2013.

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Originally Posted by CrowBat
…didn't happen (at least not in 2013; otherwise it would've been reported). While, the Pentagon and various of NATO allies stopped something like 15 minutes before from launching a military operation against Assad.
If Obama had launched TLAMs or established a blockade in 2013, Assad would have been screaming for help.

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Originally Posted by CrowBat
…didn't happen (at least not in 2013). And was also not intended by the Russians.
Right. We are talking about your alternate timeline where Obama launches TLAMs and establishes a blockade.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CrowBat
This happened only in 2015 and then for reasons I explained above: Putler went to Syria because he was sure Oblabla wouldn't. Indeed, because the Iranians told him that Oblabla promised Tehran he wouldn't. And Iranians could do so because Oblabla told them so - in exchange for his silly nuclear deal, signed... drums... in July 2015.
The Iranians would have had this prerequisite long before the JCPOA was drafted, and would have signaled Obama if he had intervened in Syria in 2013.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CrowBat
And then, all provided you can still follow, explain me please: who can, say, prevent Turkey from closing its airspace for all Russian aircraft if it likes to do so? (And keep in mind: Turkey did close its airspace for Russian military aircraft, ever since September 2015). Who can prevent Jordan from closing its airspace for all Iranian aircraft? And: who was in control of the Iraqi government as of 2013?
Russia could take an alternate air route with refueling, rely upon sealift or transit via Iraq, which was led by Maliki, who would probably have allowed it. After all, Iraq currently hosts Iranian special forces and has sent Iranian-led Iraqi Shia militias to Syria.
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Old 05-02-2017   #33
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You forgot to include...
That was no invitation for more polemic, but a very serious, 'closed' question: i.e. I expect a clear yes or no reply.
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Old 05-02-2017   #34
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Russian MoD denies @hrw report that Soviet-era bombs were used in chemical attack, says not 1 Western inspector has visited site in Syria.
...as if one needs any 'Western inspector' - to get killed by old Russian bombs: there are enough photos and videos of what are VKS fighter-bombers dropping around.

Except of ODAB-500s, the 'newest' stuff are FAB-500M-62s: 62 stands for the year of their design... (1962).

BTW, the VKS now has at least one A-50 SRDLO (Russian for AWACS) in Syria. The source is 'murky', to put it mildly, but the photo appears to be genuine: it was taken near Hmemmem AB, on 29 April.

This, in turn, is 'little surprising', considering number of sorties flown every day is indicating that the Russians meanwhile have about 50 combat aircraft - mind: combat aircraft, i.e. fighter-bombers alone - deployed at Hmemmem.
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Old 05-02-2017   #35
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That was no invitation for more polemic, but a very serious, 'closed' question: i.e. I expect a clear yes or no reply.
No
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Old 05-02-2017   #36
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Default AQ leader calls for followers to change their strategy

From an Israeli source, citing a speech on April 23rd 2017:
Quote:
Al-Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri calls on his followers in al-Sham (greater Syria) to abandon the concept of territorial control and concentrate on guerilla warfare, joined by other Muslims around the globe
Link:http://www.terrorism-info.org.il/en/article/21198
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Old 05-02-2017   #37
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Default Testimony (Charles Lister): Syria After the Missile Strikes: Policy Options

The following testimony was presented to the United States House Committee on Foreign Affairs on April 27, 2017, by Charles Lister

http://www.mei.edu/content/article/t...policy-options

Selected excerpts and my comments - Part 1/2:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Lister
Whereas the U.S. decision not to act in August 2013 was justified at the time by a Russian-facilitated deal to remove and destroy Syria’s chemical weapons stockpile, events in Khan Sheikhoun demonstrated starkly that that deal had been a ruse. Israeli intelligence now assesses that Bashar al-Assad has secretly retained at least three tons of Sarin nerve agent, enough to kill many thousands more people, should he choose to do so. This was not much of a secret. Officials in the U.S. government and all of our principal allies have known as much for years.
In August 2013, Assad had at least 1,000 tons of chemical weapons, including several hundred of Sarin. According to the DOD (https://fas.org/sgp/crs/nuke/R42848.pdf), securing Assad’s stockpiles by force would have required the deployment of up to 75,000 soldiers, including thousands of regular and special forces on the ground in Syria, and an air and naval campaign far larger than the 60 aircraft and 7 ships required for Operation Odyssey Dawn in 2011. Not only did the 2013 “Framework” destroy or remove nearly all of Assad’s CWs, it dismantled their infrastructure and delivery systems. The deal prevented Assad’s formidable arsenal from being transferred to Hezbollah for use against Israel, or falling under Al Qaeda or Daesh control, which U.S. military intervention may not have been able to achieve. Unfortunately, the deal ensured Assad’s survival and continued war against his own citizens, with increased Iranian and Russian support.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Lister
The Syrian crisis is immensely complicated – I have spent virtually every single day since March 2011 trying my best to understand it. Despite this very clear complexity, one thing ought to be simple: the continued presence of Bashar al-Assad in Damascus as Syria’s self-proclaimed President does not promise any semblance of hope for the country’s future…the single biggest push and pull factor for both Al-Qaeda and ISIS in Syria, is the Assad regime’s continued survival and the brutal violence it unleashes upon its people.
I agree. Yet behind Assad is Iran, much as Iran was behind Maliki’s efforts to marginalize the Sunni Arabs of Iraq. Therefore, we arrive at the second humanitarian compromise in order to minimize the threat of WMDs: permitting Iran to pursue a sectarian war in Iraq and Syria in return for an agreement on Iran’s nuclear weapons program.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Lister
In April 2017, the Assad regime finds itself sat more comfortably in Damascus than at any point since the start of the crisis in the Spring of 2011. Its use of banned chemical weapons a few weeks ago is almost certainly a result of that confidence.
I doubt Assad is comfortable, as he sits only at the pleasure of Teheran, whose calculus may well change. His recent use of Sarin was an unambiguous test of the new U.S. administration’s interest in Syria and resolve.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Lister
It is also important not to forget history. To claim that Bashar al-Assad was never our enemy would be to brush over his extraordinary and widely documented role in empowering ISIS’s predecessor movements in Iraq, who fought against and killed American soldiers for years on end.
This is in addition to Syria’s invasions of Israel and Lebanon, ties to U.S. adversaries Iran and North Korea, support for designated terrorist group Hezbollah, and attempt to develop nuclear weapons.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Lister
So what now? Clearly the status quo is not working…Major foreign intervention in search of regime change, however, carries far too many risks and promises only further chaos. What is needed is a policy that sits in-between. Determined U.S. leadership backed up by the credible and now proven threat of force presents the best opportunity in years to strong-arm actors on the ground into a phase of meaningful de-escalation, out of which eventually, a durable negotiation process may result.
Specifics will be needed. Is the U.S. supposed to partition the country into ethnic and sectarian enclaves and then use force to prevent one group from aggressing against another? What about the mixed areas on the frontlines? Should the U.S. be neutral except where Al Qaeda and Daesh are concerned, but ignore the foreign Shia mercenaries marauding on behalf of Assad? How can the U.S. ensure compliance from Iran and Russia? Currently, the regime is determined to reconquer the country, despite being reliant upon foreign funding, manpower and materiel to do so. How can its calculus be changed without changing the regime itself?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Lister
More punitive military strikes and other assertive acts of diplomacy will be inevitable, but if anything is now clear, it is that the U.S. has more freedom of action in Syria than the Obama administration was ever willing to admit. Opponents of limited U.S. intervention who have long and confidently pronounced the inevitability of conflict with Russia are now faced with the reality that Moscow failed to lift a finger when American missiles careered toward Assad regime targets. This is not to suggest that Russia plans to sit back and watch the United States threaten or undermine its proxy, Assad.
Exactly. Moscow will tolerate a slap on the wrist that does not materially alter the balance of forces, but not a decapitating blow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Lister
Beyond Russia though, Iran is arguably a far greater challenge and obstacle to progress…Keeping Assad in place also secures Iranian hegemony through Tehran-Baghdad-Damascus-Beirut and into the Palestinian Territories. Beyond being a great victory for Iran, that also represents a major defeat to American interests and influence in the region. It also risks inflaming further, existing great power competition involving Iran, Saudi Arabia and Turkey.
Agreed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Lister
Russia’s intervention in Syria saved Assad from possible defeat, that is clear. However, the more secure Assad feels, the less he appears restrained by Russian instruction. In other words, Russia’s leverage over Assad may be declining…As one prominent Russian in Moscow recently told me in Europe, even Russia’s own Spetsnaz special forces have come to respect one such Iran-backed terrorist group — Hezbollah — more than the Syrian Army itself.
Russia is likely interested in a negotiated settlement and a partitioned country with a “frozen conflict”, whereas Iran is determined to secure total victory over every inch of Syria.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Lister
As things stand today, Syria can be divided up into dozens of semi-contained conflicts, every one of which is individually unique. Assad may be more secure than ever, but he is a very long way from a full territorial re-conquest of his country. That objective may take a decade, or not even be possible at all. Despite this dissolution into multiple conflicts, the solution to Syria is not to be found in partition. In fact, that is one of the only issues that the opposition and the regime currently agree on. Despite the intensity and complexity of conflict, Syrians on both sides of the conflict still share a shared sense of Syrian identity. Although hard to see through the bullets and gas, this is a crucially important realization. Syria’s non-jihadist opposition, as varied, complicated and imperfect as it is, remains a force of 80,000-100,000 heavily-armed men. A substantial majority of these men, and their sons, are not considering giving up their struggle anytime soon. That is also a crucially important realization. It will only be by addressing these kinds of realities that we will begin to define a meaningful policy.
They may not have a choice. The Sunni Arab majority will not accept minority Alawi rule; neither will the Alawis, Christians and Druze accept a possible tyranny of the majority by way of democracy (such as in Iraq). Moreover, the Kurds are not about to surrender a de facto independent Rojava, which ideology aside is not dissimilar to Iraq’s KAR.
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Old 05-02-2017   #38
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Default Testimony (Charles Lister): Syria After the Missile Strikes: Policy Options

The following testimony was presented to the United States House Committee on Foreign Affairs on April 27, 2017, by Charles Lister

http://www.mei.edu/content/article/t...policy-options

Selected excerpts and my comments - Part 2/2:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Lister
A holistic strategy is required that treats all the various symptoms as inter-linked components of a very big problem. The United States can choose to make big decisions and spend substantial amounts of resources now, or we can continue today’s strategy and face virtual certainty of having to come back and do even more to try to fix an even greater problem several years from now.
Washington will go with choice “b”. Even if a commitment on the order of Western Europe, Japan and South Korea is the most sensible choice, Americans will balk at the up-front costs. The war in Afghanistan is not even over, but according to the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, development aid to Afghanistan has already cost the U.S. more than the Marshall Plan in equivalent U.S. dollars. That is a damning indictment of “leading from behind”, leaving a “light footprint” or whatever American bureaucrats call a limited and restricted intervention. Note that today, Japan, Western Europe and South Korea are all American allies and host U.S. forces; they all contribute to American and global freedom, peace and prosperity. Conversely, we all know what losing the peace meant in the former Confederate states, Germany, Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya, and what limiting the war effort meant in South Vietnam.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Lister
There is no perceivable opening for a grand, nationwide settlement to the conflict in Syria. As such, the best available interim solution is to introduce calm to geographically distinct zones in Syria, in which local Syrian actors and external actors with influence in the area can agree to freeze existing lines of conflict...In today’s dynamics, five such zones come to mind: (1) the existing zone under Turkish influence in northern Aleppo; (2) a new zone under Turkish influence in northern Idlib; (3) the formalization of a zone of stability under SDF influence in northeastern Syria; (4) a new zone of stability in southern and southwestern Syria, under the influence of Jordan and Israel; and (5) a new, future zone of stability in eastern Syria, divided between the Assad regime and newly formed, local U.S.-backed anti-ISIS forces…These zones of calm would face multiple determined spoilers, particularly Assad himself.
Regarding:

(2) What about the existing pro-Assad zone around Aleppo and the Kurdish zone around Afrin? Assad would have to give up Aleppo to Turkish/FSA forces and the Kurds would be surrounded by Turkish or FSA forces on all sides of their enclave.

(3) Yet there is evidence of ethnic and sectarian cleansing by the YPG against non-Kurds, and Turkey would not be particularly tolerant about a PKK-aligned statelet bordering its restive southeastern Kurdish region.

(4) Why Israel? Nothing brings Syrians of all ethnicities and faiths closer together than the presence of Israeli forces on their soil.

(5) This is a terrible idea. Having Shias and Kurds occupy Sunni Arab areas is a recipe for endless insurgency. It would be preferable to cede this area to Jordan as well. Assad should be confined to his western enclave.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Lister
The United States must urgently acknowledge and act to confront the malign activities of Iran in exploiting pre-existing instability in the Middle East to undermine its rivals and to establish hegemonic influence for itself.
Yet confronting Iran brings with it serious risks, such as the abrogation of the JCPOA with the looming cloud of war to disarm Iran, as well as a spoiling of the anti-Daesh efforts in northern Iraq, which are dependent upon Shia militias subject to a great deal of Iranian influence. In addition to Iraq, Iran could also make life difficult for the U.S. in Afghanistan and turn Hezbollah’s attention back toward Israel.
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Old 05-03-2017   #39
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Azor...I had already seen the Lister comments via social media...BUT here is the interesting thing...outside of social media comments...US MSM and the Trump WH NSC basically ignored his comments...

AND neither Trump WH NSC nor CENTCOM nor US MSM is actively questioning the American support to and for a Communist inspired and led Kurdish PKK a US named terror group...

Example it took social media pointing out that a proRussian mercenary who had fought in the Russian mercenary army in eastern Ukraine and joined the US Army and was on active duty...then finally a single MSM outlet picked it up...and it ended there...
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Old 05-03-2017   #40
OUTLAW 09
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Join Date: Nov 2013
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As long as the Trump WH and Trump himself is in total chaos there will be no US FP on just about anything.....

Trump called Obama weak on #SouthChinaSea patrols. 100 days in, he seems to have halted them entirely.

Fmr AG Yates warned WH Jan26 that Flynn could be compromised by Russia. Did Trump lie on Feb10 when asked about it?

Sally Yates to contradict White House about Flynn & Russia. She told WH on Jan 26; Feb 10 Trump said he knew nothing
http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/02/politi...y-contradict/#

Lies..bluffs and "Wag the Dog moments" are not FP....and Assad is still using chemicals...
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