SMALL WARS COUNCIL
Go Back   Small Wars Council > Conflicts -- Current & Future > Other, By Region > Middle East

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-19-2014   #61
davidbfpo
Council Member
 
davidbfpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 11,160
Default

A short column by Lorenzo Vidino, a SME on the Muslim Brotherhood; in which he succinctly explains the UK governments review as:
Quote:
.... a genuine effort to better understand the group and redesign Whitehall’s strategy towards it as the world’s most significant Islamist movement.
Link:http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/1...otherhood.html
__________________
davidbfpo
davidbfpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2015   #62
davidbfpo
Council Member
 
davidbfpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 11,160
Default

An update on the UK government's review of the Muslim Brotherhood, which in the end effectively "sat on the fence" despite pressure from several foreign nations:http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...-idea-analysis

Sir John Jenkins the report's author writes irregular articles and IIRC one, maybe two have posted on the forum.
__________________
davidbfpo
davidbfpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2015   #63
davidbfpo
Council Member
 
davidbfpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 11,160
Default An elusive global fraternity

Thanks to a "lurker" for the pointer to The Economist's easier to read report and with a link to the published UK government report's summary.http://www.economist.com/blogs/erasm...im-brotherhood

The report:https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...n_Findings.pdf

A fine balancing act for some, as The Economist cites the two author's views:
Quote:
In a relatively tough judgment, one of the report's co-authors, Sir John Jenkins, concluded:

For the most part, the Muslim Brotherhood have preferred non-violent incremental change on the grounds of expediency, often on the basis that political opposition will disappear when the process of Islamisation is complete. But they are prepared to countenance violence—including, from time to time, terrorism—where gradualism is ineffective.
But the report's other co-author, Charles Farr, offered a more lenient view of Brotherhood-inspired groups working in Britain. He found that "such groups had in the past held out the prospect and ambition of an Islamic state in this country as elsewhere" but went on to insist that "there was no indication that the Muslim Brotherhood still held this view or at least openly promoted an Islamic state here."
__________________
davidbfpo
davidbfpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2016   #64
davidbfpo
Council Member
 
davidbfpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 11,160
Default

An interesting review of the Muslim Brotherhood, under the theme of 'Is the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organization or a firewall against violent extremism?' by a US academic:https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2016/03/07/is-the-muslim-brotherhood-a-terrorist-organization-or-a-firewall-against-violent-extremism/?

He concludes:
Quote:
The Muslim Brotherhood’s firewall against extremism, therefore, was a very real thing in the decade following 9/11. It was sustained by the seeming success of the strategic choices by the leadership, a robust organizational structure able to enforce internal discipline and the socialization of its members into the organization’s norms. All three of the key mechanisms by which the firewall operated have now dramatically eroded.
This does not mean that the Brotherhood has been or is becoming a terrorist organization. It does mean that earlier assessments of its ability to play a role as a firewall against violent extremism need to be updated.
__________________
davidbfpo
davidbfpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2016   #65
CrowBat
Council Member
 
CrowBat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Haxbach, Schnurliland
Posts: 1,471
Default

Well... can't talk about MBs at such levels. Only observe that in the case of Egypt, even members of the Brotherhood eventually turned against it - and supported Sisi's (Saudi-sponsored) coup - because of their conclusion that the MB-run gov went 'too far', i.e. 'applied terror against own population'.

That most of them (members of MB that turned against the MB) eventually landed in various of Sisi's prisons is a different story, of course...
CrowBat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2016   #66
davidbfpo
Council Member
 
davidbfpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 11,160
Default

Crowbat,

That story is nearly as good as that by ex-Jihadists whose violence had ended, with individuals bound by a signed agreement with the Egyptian state (via Internal Security agencies) to refrain from political activity. When the overthrow of the Mubarek regime began they were asking can we join in or not? Apparently their leadership IIRC stated "stay at home".

One wonders what happened to them afterwards, let alone with Sisi takng power.
__________________
davidbfpo
davidbfpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2016   #67
CrowBat
Council Member
 
CrowBat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Haxbach, Schnurliland
Posts: 1,471
Default

In the Middle East, most of such stories end in some prison. That's the core problem with that part of the world.
CrowBat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2017   #68
davidbfpo
Council Member
 
davidbfpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 11,160
Default Are they revolutionaries now?

An article from The Hudson Institute, which I understand is conservative in outlook and by Mokhtar Awad (from GWU and other places).

The author earlier on writes:
Quote:
...it is important to carefully examine the relationship between one of the oldest Islamist movements in the world and violence over the past four years, and what ideological revisions have taken place. This paper will focus more on the latter, specifically related to a recent book authored by a group of Muslim Brotherhood and allied Islamist scholars, which was sanctioned by the then leadership of the organization inside Egypt, titled The Jurisprudence of Popular Resistance to the Coup. The book provides a critical insight into how some scholars have successfully attempted to reconcile the group’s methodology with violence.
It ends citing the book's author:
Quote:
The Muslim Brotherhood inside [Egypt] has revised itself since the beginning of 2014. It is a reformist organization that believes in the constitutional approach, gradualist reform, and participated in many elections, and so on. Then after that, the Muslim Brotherhood changed to [adopt] revolutionary thought. This change did not come overnight. This is a change that [is based] on much literature [produced] inside the group, meetings, and workshops. The revolutionary transformation is now in every Muslim Brotherhood household, in every Brotherhood Shu’ba (local branch), and no can, whomever they may be, extinguish this revolutionary thought. This is the transformation. The Muslim Brothers have indeed changed.
Link:https://www.hudson.org/research/1378...im-brotherhood
__________________
davidbfpo

Last edited by davidbfpo; 07-29-2017 at 10:57 PM. Reason: 51,275v
davidbfpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9. ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Registered Users are solely responsible for their messages.
Operated by, and site design © 2005-2009, Small Wars Foundation