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Intelligence What do we know, need to know, and how do we get there?

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Old 03-04-2009   #41
marcus.climenole
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Wow, great information. I will have to go back through the information posted in this thread more closely. In addition, I'll repost whatever information I find on the topic from elsewhere.

(slightly off topic). Somebody notified me of another spy, Stig Bergling, who was busted in 2005, who they say used shortwave radios to receive communications from the FSB. I'm going to dig into him as well.

You've been very helpful. And thanks for the compliment.
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Old 03-04-2009   #42
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Default Dangers in meeting a spy exposed (again?)

The vulnerability to traditional methods (investigation and surveillance) appear to be present in this case. This vulnerability might explain the FSB's delight in exposing a UK spy network / method when an electronic dead letter box was found; IIRC disguised as a rock containing a recording device and you broadcast over a very short distance the text. This appeared on news websites in January 2006 and this is the BBC's report: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/4638136.stm

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Last edited by davidbfpo; 03-04-2009 at 10:25 AM. Reason: Add research and link
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Old 03-04-2009   #43
jmm99
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Default I noticed that the FSB ....

did not reveal its sources and methods, at least in the BBC article, used to detect the "rock radio".

Since the transmission signals may have been very short range (don't know that, but that is an inference), signal intercepts may not have been the key. If the FSB surveils adversary diplomats as well as the KGB did, investigation and surveillence may, indeed, have been the key - too many UK diplos hanging around a location punching their hand-helds.

In any event, the 2006 incident seems closer to what m.c is looking for - simply updated in technology.
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Old 03-04-2009   #44
bourbon
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Default Allegedly this is how it worked....

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Old 03-07-2009   #45
jmm99
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Default Were it only so easy ....

as this .....
Attached Images
File Type: jpg rat cats.jpg (40.3 KB, 1112 views)
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Old 09-02-2009   #46
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Default Cold War continuations

To paraphrase Our Lord (and the cats), the spies will always be among us. Two briefs notes on spy convictions, one in the US and one in Russia:

Quote:
Ex-CIA spy's son pleads guilty to conspiracy
By WILLIAM McCALL (AP) – 5 days ago

PORTLAND, Ore. — The son of an ex-CIA spy has pleaded guilty to conspiracy after admitting he met with his father's former Russian handlers and accepted money from them.

Nathaniel Nicholson entered guilty pleas Thursday to conspiracy to act as an agent of a foreign government and conspiracy to commit money laundering.

Federal prosecutors said the younger Nicholson traveled around the world taking cash from agents of the Russian Federation, who were trying to find out how much ex-CIA agent Harold "Jim" Nicholson had told U.S. investigators.

Jim Nicholson, an Oregon native, was the CIA's chief instructor in spy "tradecraft" when he sold information on the agents he was training to the Russians. He was convicted in 1997 and sentenced to 23 years in prison.
and

Quote:
Russian officer sentenced for spying
.Published: Aug. 28, 2009 at 11:49 AM

ROSTOV-ON-DON, Russia, Aug. 28 (UPI) -- A Russian military officer has been sentenced to six years in prison after being convicted of spying for Georgia in the conflict involving South Ossetia.

Lt. Colonel Mikhail Khachidze, a deputy unit commander in the North Caucasus Military District, was accused of passing military secrets to Georgia after being recruited in October 2007, the Russian information service RIA Novosti reported Friday.

Prosecutor Lt. Gen. Vladimir Milovanov said Khachidze was motivated to spy because he needed money.

"He passed sensitive information for just $2,000," Milovanov said. "He was always in debt."

In addition to a prison sentence, the military court stripped Khachidze of his rank.
The "Great Game" continues.
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Old 09-02-2009   #47
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Default Hey Mike...

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmm99 View Post
Lt. Colonel Mikhail Khachidze, a deputy unit commander in the North Caucasus Military District, was accused of passing military secrets to Georgia after being recruited in October 2007, the Russian information service RIA Novosti reported Friday.
Now this one in particular worries me the most. He got 2 grand for that funky information

The Georgians certainly didn't win and the Russian aircraft missed almost all of their targets... WTF

I need a new job
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Old 09-03-2009   #48
jmm99
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Default Hey Stan ...

Cost of Russian LTC - $2,000
Cost of CIA officer - ~ $100,000+
Cost of EOD SNCO - priceless


If you want legal advice on your new employment contract, PM me - I can still read a little Cyrillac with some assistence.
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Old 10-22-2009   #49
Stan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmm99 View Post

If you want legal advice on your new employment contract, PM me - I can still read a little Cyrillac with some assistance.
Mike,
You'd be surprised to know that we have legal assistants known as Bankruptcy Managers who handle things such as auctioning off Herman's art and firearm collection as he "sits" in holding. Basically, Herman was no where near bankrupt til the State determined what damage he had done in $$$. Now he is truely bankrupt

They hope to get 70 grand or so, selling his booty (or is that bounty?) and estimate that he will still be in debt should he live through his incarceration.

It gets even better... there's a film in the making - Betrayer of the State coming to cinemas soon (unlikely to your area)

Regards, Stan
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Old 10-23-2009   #50
jmm99
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Default Truly, this was a tragedy ...

which had to affect adversely many innocent people. Probably something I shouldn't have joked about.

Best as always

Mike

PS: I won't spend much time sreaching for the video. I think I'll stick with the old Meg Ryan romances, which always turn out well.
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Old 06-04-2014   #51
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Default We catch spies, do you?

A fascinating Foreign Affairs article 'The Estonian Spymasters: Tallinn's Revolutionary Approach to Stopping Russian Spies':http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articl...masters-000000

The title comes from this comment by Estonia's President:
Quote:
We caught four moles in the last five years....That means one of two things. Either we’re the only country in the EU with a mole problem, or we’re the only country in the EU doing anything about it.
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Old 06-06-2014   #52
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I talked a little with the Estonians this week about the articles. They take their counter intel seriously.
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Old 09-02-2016   #53
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Default Simm has been interviewed for a book

Spotted in a the journal INS a review of Edward Lucas's book, Deception: The Untold Story of East-West Espionage Today, published 2013, that the book's capstone was:
Quote:
remarkable interviews with the imprisoned Simm
Edward Lucas is an Economist writer, based in London, with a stint in Moscow. The interviews are an 'exclusive' from a comment by a reviewer on:https://www.amazon.com/Deception-Unt...spionage+Today

Or UK:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Deception-U...spionage+Today

INS in full is Intelligence and National Security which is published six times a year, with a global group of academic and other contributors. The review is behind a paywall.
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