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Old 11-12-2008   #41
JeffWolf
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Default USINDO: Indonesia’s War on Terror

http://www.usindo.org/publications/r...arOnTerror.pdf

Indonesia’s War on Terror, by William Wise describes the threat from international terrorism and Jakarta’s response. The desirability of law reform and
improving Indonesia’s intelligence capabilities are highlighted.
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Old 05-20-2009   #42
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ICG, 20 May 09: Indonesia: Radicalisation of the Palembang Group
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Indonesia has earned well-deserved praise for its handling of home-grown extremism, but the problem has not gone away. In April 2009, ten men involved in a jihadi group in Palembang, South Sumatra, were sent to prison on terrorism charges for killing a Christian teacher and planning more ambitious attacks. Their history provides an unusually detailed case study of radicalisation – the process by which law-abiding individuals become willing to use violence to achieve their goals. The sobering revelation from Palembang is how easy that transformation can be if the right ingredients are present: a core group of individuals, a charismatic leader, motivation and opportunity. Another ingredient, access to weapons, is important but not essential: the Palembang group carried out its first attack with a hammer and only later moved to making bombs......
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Old 07-07-2009   #43
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Default Conflict, Community, and Criminality in Southeast Asia and Australia

CSIS, 30 Jun 09: Conflict, Community, and Criminality in Southeast Asia and Australia: Assessments From the Field

A collection of essays with a foreword by Marc Sageman.
Quote:
....In Southeast Asia, as in the rest of the world, it would be naïve to believe that terrorism can be defeated. It is and will remain a tactic of the weak against their government, and Southeast Asia has seen its share throughout modern history. However, the appeal of Islam is fading in some theaters but gaining strength in a few others due to local reasons. In the future, terrorism in Southeast Asia may still be waged in the name of new concepts. The key to holding it in check is to not overreact, punish only the criminals directly involved in violence, and encourage young people that might be attracted to violent ideology to pursue their political activism in a more effective and lawful way.
Essays include:
  • Radical Islam in the Middle East and Southeast Asia: A Comparison
  • The Middle East, Islamism, and Indonesia: Pull versus Push Factors
  • Jemaah Islamiyah and New Splinter Groups
  • Can Indonesian Democracy Tame Radical Islamism?
  • The Role of Radical Madrasahs in Terrorism: The Indonesian Case
  • Communal Violence in Indonesia and the Role of Foreign and Domestic Networks
  • Radical Islam in Malaysia
  • Governmental Responses to Extremism in Southeast Asia: “Hard” versus “Soft” Approaches
  • The Malayu Insurgency in Thailand’s Southern Border Provinces
  • “A Carnival of Crime”: The Enigma of the Abu Sayyaf
  • Will the Conflict in Mindanao Look Like the Insurgency in Southern Thailand?
  • Little-known Muslim Communities and Concerns in Cambodia, Burma, and Northern Thailand
  • Assessment of Criminal Threats Emanating from Burma
  • The Extremist Threat in Australia
  • Muslim Alienation in Australia: Europe Down Under?
  • Jihadi Ideology: An Overview
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Old 07-23-2009   #44
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CTC, 22 Jul 09: Radical Islamist Ideology in Southeast Asia

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....The 17 July 2009 terrorist attacks on two hotels in Jakarta, Indonesia were a vivid reminder of the breadth of the battle space and the importance of constant vigilance. This break in Indonesia’s four-year calm might be a one-time event or an indication of a resurgent regional terror threat. With crude weapons and little logistical support, a small group of people were capable of carrying out an attack that received global media attention. The focus on the perpetrators of this attack may also veil the importance of ideologies other than global jihadism to political violence in the region, such as various strands of ethno-nationalism. As this report highlights, global jihadism is not the only ideology animating terrorist violence, and ethno-nationalism is still a prevalent force in Southeast Asia.

The inherent difficulty of tactical defense makes it ever more important to address the broader ideological and strategic aspects of the terror threat in the hopes of identifying important trends. This volume examines the salience and content of jihadi ideology across Southeast Asia in an attempt to gain a better understanding of the types of threats and susceptibility to global jihadist violence in the region.....
Essays Include:
  • The Landscape of Jihadism in Southeast Asia
  • The Current and Emerging Extremist Threat in Malaysia
  • The historical development of Jihadi Islamist thought in Indonesia
  • The Influence of Transnational Jihadist Ideology on Islamic Extremist Groups in the Philippines: The Cases of the Abu Sayyaf Group and the Rajah Solaiman Movement
  • Ideology, Religion, and Mobilization in the Southern Thai Conflict
  • A Survey of Southeast Asian Global Jihadist Websites
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Old 07-24-2009   #45
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ICG, 24 Jul 09: Indonesia: The Hotel Bombings
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On 17 July 2009, suicide bombers attacked two hotels in the heart of a Jakarta business district, killing nine and injuring more than 50, the first successful terrorist attack in Indonesia in almost four years. While no one has claimed responsibility, police are virtually certain it was the work of Noordin Mohammed Top, who leads a breakaway group from Jemaah Islamiyah (JI), the regional jihadi organisation responsible for the first Bali bombing in 2002. One of the hotels, the Marriott, was bombed by Noordin’s group in 2003; this time, a meeting of mostly foreign businessmen appears to have been the target. The restaurant of the nearby Ritz-Carlton was also bombed.

The attack sets back Indonesia’s counter-terrorism efforts, but its political and economic impact has been minor. On 23 July President Yudhoyono was declared the winner of the 8 July elections with more than 60 per cent of the vote; nothing about the bombing is likely to weaken his government or prompt a crisis. The impact on the business community, which lost four prominent members, has been devastating, but economic indicators are stable.....
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Old 07-26-2009   #46
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I'm not sure I'd agree that the attacks are a "setback to Indonesia's counter-terrorism efforts"... they seem to me less a setback than an indication that the job is not finished.

JI and other jihadi groups have been substantially alienated from the Indonesian public. The deaths of Indonesians and Muslims in terror attacks have not been well received, and the jihadi agenda lacks popular appeal. The general quiet in sectarian violence in Maluku and Sulawesi has removed a powerful recruitment driver. Many JI leaders and members have been arrested and the group has splintered to a large extent.

It must be remembered, though, that JI is not an insurgency, it's a terrorist group. In many ways the group is most dangerous when it is pared down to a small core network of committed extremists. Even with very limited manpower and resources, a group like Top's can still generate very dangerous attacks.

ICG's recommendations make sense, though I would emphasize the need to achieve a permanent resolution to the sectarian conflicts that have provided extremists with their raison d'etre in the past. The Indonesians are on the right track and need to stay on it, but that does not and cannot assure that there will not be more such attacks as the process goes on. Unfortunately the nature of modern terrorism allows even a largely defeated group to make an enormous mess.
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Old 08-28-2009   #47
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ICG, 27 Aug 09: Indonesia: Noordin Top’s Support Base
Quote:
This briefing examines the linkages among the people Noordin drew on for the 17 July attacks in an effort to understand his support base. It is focused on the local network, mostly on Java, not on the overseas links, as those were still being uncovered as this went to press. It is not about the ongoing police investigation and does not draw on any privileged information from the men arrested since 17 July. It is necessarily an interim study, using the known pieces of the puzzle to help explain why Noordin and his network have not only survived in Indonesia, but in some senses thrived. It is based on press reports and interviews conducted in connection with the current investigation, and extensive reading of documents collected for previous Crisis Group reports.
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Old 08-19-2010   #48
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Default Update to listen to

A little reported insurgency, even if in a strategic location and understandably Indonesia did not want an external media role. This is an update on Aceh, with a podcast:http://www.lowyinterpreter.org/post/...ceh-today.aspx

I'd forgotten the eventual peace agreement was signed in Helsinki and without research a sign that Nordic quiet diplomacy worked.
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Old 09-14-2010   #49
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The link in the original post appears to be broken. If you are looking for this document, please try this link instead: The Political Consequences of Military Operations in Indonesia 1945-99.
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Old 03-31-2011   #50
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Default Decoding Indonesia’s radical Islamists: What to de-radicalize?

Quote:
Due to a host of factors, Indonesia continues to witness an upsurge of religious radicalism. Some salient characteristics, the DNA of radicalism so to speak, stand out when one analyses the attitudes and behavior of jihadists.

The jihadist embodies the following characteristics:
Link:http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2...adicalize.html
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Old 04-19-2011   #51
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ICG, 19 Apr 11: Indonesian Jihadism: Small Groups, Big Plans
Quote:
Violent extremism in Indonesia increasingly is taking the form of small groups acting independently of large jihadi organisations but sometimes encouraged by them. This is in part a response to effective law enforcement that has resulted in widespread arrests and structural weakening of Jemaah Islamiyah (JI), Jama’ah Ansharut Tauhid (JAT) and other organisations accused of links to terrorism. But it is also the result of ideological shifts that favour “individual” over “organisational” jihad and low-cost, smallscale targeted killings over mass casualty attacks that inadvertently kill Muslims....
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Old 04-22-2011   #52
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Default One big plan disrupted

http://www.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/asiapc...lan/index.html

Quote:
Authorities found about 150 kilograms (330 pounds) of explosives near the church on Thursday, said Boy Rafli Amar, the national police spokesman.

There were two large bombs and five smaller ones, he said.
The actual CNN report (on T.V.) also mentioned the bombs were placed next to a gas pipeline and that the potential casualty figures could have been quite high if this attack wasn't disrupted.

The security forces in Indonesia have been highly successful in the past few years, but extremist groups are still operating. One of their goals is to re-create the ethnic strife responsible for hundreds of deaths a decade ago, which appears to be the logic behind this target.

Indonesia is the largest Muslim nation in the world, so what happens there matters.
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Old 04-23-2011   #53
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Default something else matters

Off topic, but another side of Indonesia:

Quote:
Tens of thousands of fans will greet teen heartthrob Justin Bieber at his concert in Sentul Bogor Saturday, event organizer Berlian Entertainment said.

...

Around 1,000 security personnel will be deployed to secure the concert, Berlian Entertainment Project Director Marcel Permadhi said. Security will consist of the police, the military as well as private security personnel, Marcel said. Bieber will also bring his own bodyguards, Marcel said. About 100 medical staff and 10 ambulance units will be on stand by during the event.
Thousands of fans to greet teen heartthrob at concert - Prodita Sabarini - Jakarta Post - 23 April, 2011

and 'back in the day'...

Quote:
In 1993, youths rioted outside a Jakarta stadium after being denied entrance to a "Metallica" concert. The Indonesian news agency reported 13 people were taken to hospital, and cars and houses were damaged. But independent reports said the rioting was much more serious. The Indonesian government said it would take more care in issuing rock concert permits.
global metal - metallica concert, jakarta 1993 - youtube

Metallica setlist, April 10, 1993, Jakarta - metallica.com

...

but also:

Quote:
A suicide bomber attacked the Adz-Zikro mosque located within a police complex in Cirebon City in Indonesia last Friday, April 15, 2011. Dozens were injured when the bomb exploded during Friday prayers. Indonesia is the most populous Muslim dominated nation in the world and in recent years, it has been targeted by extremist terrorist groups.
Indonesia: Suicide Bomber Targets Police Mosque - Tikno - Global Voices - 21 April, 2011

Last edited by Backwards Observer; 04-23-2011 at 11:15 AM. Reason: add link
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Old 04-24-2011   #54
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I don't what concerns me more, thousands of Justin Bieber fans in Indonesia, or Islamists in Indonesia?

Actually I think one feeds the other, and there are at least two movements that appear to be gaining traction in Indonesia. One is a movement towards the West. They want to incorporate some western business models and culture. Another movement is back towards fundamentalist Islam, and they'll employ extreme tactics in hopes of stopping the progression towards the West. I think the fact that there are thousands of Bieber fans simply makes the situation both more dangerous in the short run and perhaps more hopeful in the long run.
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Old 04-24-2011   #55
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Default it's bieber's world (2.0), we just live in it

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Moore View Post
I don't what concerns me more, thousands of Justin Bieber fans in Indonesia, or Islamists in Indonesia?
I know, tough call. If it was thousands of Islamist Justin Bieber fans, then there might be real trouble...or something.

Quote:
Actually I think one feeds the other, and there are at least two movements that appear to be gaining traction in Indonesia. One is a movement towards the West. They want to incorporate some western business models and culture. Another movement is back towards fundamentalist Islam, and they'll employ extreme tactics in hopes of stopping the progression towards the West. I think the fact that there are thousands of Bieber fans simply makes the situation both more dangerous in the short run and perhaps more hopeful in the long run.
I agree with this. Thousands of Metallica fans can't be wrong...er, can they?
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Old 05-06-2011   #56
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Default no rest for the wicked problem

More very naughty behaviour averted in Indonesia.

Quote:
JAKARTA - INDONESIAN police said on Thursday they had found six unexploded bombs similar to one detonated by a suicide bomber inside a police mosque last month.

National police spokesman Boy Rafli Amar said the improvised devices appeared to have been prepared for a wave of suicide attacks in the mainly Muslim archipelago of 240 million people.

'They planned to use the six pipe bombs for another terror attack like the one which was carried out by Syarif,' he told reporters, referring to the mosque bomber's name. Thirty people were wounded in that incident.
Indonesian Police Find Six Unexploded Bombs - Straits Times - May 5, 2011

(hat tip to The Interloper, ah, I mean The Interpreter )

Last edited by Backwards Observer; 05-06-2011 at 07:23 AM. Reason: link
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Old 05-24-2011   #57
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Default Prisons, radicalisation, vigilantes and bombs

A report released last week by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute found that Indonesian jails are an "incubator" of terrorist operations and recruitment, where extremists can preach, mingle freely with others (radicalisation), and have easy access to cell phones and other forms of communication:http://www.aspi.org.au/publications/...293&pubtype=10

The BB's summary:
Quote:
A new report has concluded that Indonesian prisons are incubators of terrorism where jailed jihadis form new links and even plan attacks.
The New York Times last week looked at the rise of Islamic "vigilante groups" in Indonesia, whose violence against minority sects and religions is often ignored by police:http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/20/wo...html?ref=world.

And Indonesian police alleged last week that the group said to be responsible for a deadly suicide attack on a police mosque last month was linked to the hardline cleric Abu Bakir Bashir and the group Jemaah Ansharut Tauhid:http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/home/...-bashir/441851
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Old 10-04-2011   #58
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Default More sectarian violence in Indonesia

Got this from ICG...

http://www.crisisgroup.org/en/region...-in-ambon.aspx

Quote:
Indonesia: Trouble Again in Ambon

Clashes on 11 September between Muslims and Christians in Ambon, capital of Maluku province, and sporadic incidents thereafter raised fears of a return to the communal fighting that wracked the region from 1999 to 2002. This time, an extraordinary effort by grassroots “peace provocateurs” and local officials largely kept the violence from spreading further in Maluku. But the unrest triggered efforts by extremists elsewhere to manipulate communal tensions, apparently motivating the bombing of a church in Solo, Central Java on 25 September...
Small incidents, but with potential to flare up further. Relevant to regional terror issues as well. The decline in Islamist influence in Indonesia has been closely linked to the decline in outbreaks of sectarian violence. JI and similar groups there (as elsewhere in SE Asia) have had very little success with the global jihad message, or in rallying support behind issues in Afghanistan or the Middle East: the concern is overwhelmingly with local issues. They have, however, very successfully portrayed these sectarian outbreaks as oppression of Indonesian Muslims.

Hard to say whether this outbreak was orchestrated for this purpose (the date could be coincidence) or was simply a recurring flare-up, but it bears watching, as this sort of violence has a direct bearing on local support for and recruitment by extremist groups.
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Old 10-27-2011   #59
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[anecdote] A whiles back, I was slated for a business trip to Indonesia. I asked some of the old Asia types if it might be wise to get a cheaper watch owing to stories of people getting their hands chopped off in order to steal Rolexes and such. They said that one shouldn't believe every cock and bull story one hears, and besides where I was headed they'd probably chop off the hand, throw away the watch and keep the hand.

So, it is with mild disbelief one can read today a gender theory critique of Islam as it relates to terrorism published as an editorial in the Jakarta Post, also noting that none of the comments involve chopping. Peace be upon them.

Quote:
Religious radicalism and the masculinization of God
Satrio Wahono, Jakarta | Mon, 10/24/2011

We apparently live in fear now that terrorist bombers are flourishing in the country. Less than a year after the suicide bombing of the police headquarters in Cirebon, West Java, we have again been shocked by similar acts of terror at Bethel Injil Sepenuh Church (GBIS) in Surakarta, Central Java, in late September.

This series of events inevitably leads us to the gloomy conclusion that the movement driven by radical religious doctrine has not disappeared in Indonesia. Such a doctrine believes that any means — including the use of violence — are justified to overthrow an order perceived as secular and corrupt. In exchange, followers of the doctrine aspire to establish an ideal order that they believe will be approved by God. Therefore, analyzing such a doctrine is important for us in an attempt to neutralize it.
Religious radicalism and the masculinization of God - Jakarta Post - Oct 24, 2011
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Old 01-28-2012   #60
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http://www.crisisgroup.org/en/region...n-cirebon.aspx

Quote:
Anti-vice raids and actions against non-Muslim minorities are becoming a path to more violent jihadism in Indonesia. The 2011 suicide bombings of a police mosque in Cirebon, West Java and an evangelical church in Solo, Central Java were carried out by men who moved from using sticks and stones in the name of upholding morality and curbing “deviance” to using bombs and guns. They show how ideological and tactical lines within the radical community have blurred, meaning that counter-terrorism programs that operate on the assumption that “terrorists” are a clearly definable group distinguishable from hardline activists and religious vigilantes are bound to fail. They also mean that the government must develop a strategy, consistent with democratic values, for countering clerics who use no violence themselves but preach that it is permissible to shed the blood of infidels (kafir) or oppressors (thaghut), meaning government officials and particularly the police.
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