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Old 09-23-2012   #1
davidbfpo
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Default Effectiveness: Law Enforcement -v- Organised Crime

An intriguing passage in an article by the ex-Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police today:
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In a speech two years ago, I estimated that there were about 6,000 organised criminal groups in the UK, with a total of around 38,000 individuals. Most of them operate without being disrupted by the police: indeed, in 2010, I estimated that nearly 90 per cent do. That was better than the figure for 2003, which was 94 per cent.
Link:http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukne...sed-crime.html

Organised crime has not been my area of interest, but I cannot recall seeing such an estimate in the British public domain before.

Anyone aware of any similar local, regional or national estimates of effectiveness?
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Old 09-24-2012   #2
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David, in America organized crime dosen't mean the same thing as it does in the UK. The article you posted is talking about what we would call street gangs over hear. Try researching Gang Statistics.

here is a goody.... FBI Gangs includes success stories.
http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/investig...orthefts/gangs

Last edited by slapout9; 09-24-2012 at 05:33 AM. Reason: add link
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Old 09-24-2012   #3
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Default Effectiveness

Slap,

Thanks, I expected definitions would be different. For reasons I don't fully understand here we group gangs and organised crime together.

What I was seeking was other figures on effectiveness.

I have read through the offered 2011 FBI National Gang Assessment, which has nothing on effectiveness; indeed has a few rather negative pointers.
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Old 10-01-2012   #4
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Default Confusing too

From a friend who watches this area of public policy, from a different viewpoint:
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Even in the UK, a country with many years experience of developing intelligence and collating crime statistics extremely vague and contradictory estimates might be provided by government: ‘Total cost of economic and social harm caused to the UK by organised crime is estimated at between £20 billion and £40 billion each year.’ (Home Office, 2012).

There is similar vagueness over the numbers of published targets: in July 2011 this was c38,000 individuals involving around 6,000 criminal groups; in May 2012 it was c30,000 individuals and 7,000 groups!

Confusing things further, in 2009 the Cabinet Office had published estimated costs for different types of organised crime totalling £68.4 billion!

It is instructive to compare these estimates with those for the costs of tax avoidance (legal) and tax evasion (illegal) in the UK: tax avoidance costs the UK £25 billion a year; tax evasion £70 billion a year; and uncollected tax amounts to £27 billion to £28 billion.
Later figures from:http://www.taxresearch.org.uk/Blog/2...tax-realities/
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Old 12-19-2012   #5
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Default What has worked, what has not worked, in the past

An intriguing commentary by a UK academic, Michael Woodiwiss, on organised crime and law enforcement. Within is this passage:
Quote:
The importance of dealing with organized crime... cannot be over-emphasized. Intelligent action requires knowledge - not, as in too many cases, a mere redoubling of effort in the absence of adequate information and a definite plan. The carrying out of our recommendation for immediate, comprehensive, and scientific nation-wide inquiry into organized crime should make possible the development of an intelligent plan for its control.
It is an American report:
Quote:
In 1931 the Wickersham Commission
Worth a read:http://www.historyandpolicy.org/pape...paper-138.html
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Old 12-20-2012   #6
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When one combines bad laws that create vast illegal markets with bad policies that create significant populace groups that feel there is little opportunity within the legal avenues enjoyed by others, it creates a breeding ground for gangs and organized crime.

The instinct of government is to "enforce the rule of law" - which may mitigate the symptoms a bit, may change the actors as many are shunted off into a growing network of prisons, but often serves equally to make this illegal competition even more violent and more disruptive to society.

Instead we need to take a hard look at the laws that create these illegal markets and ask if there are smarter, more effective ways to achieve the effects those laws were intended (but failed) to attain? Look at the populace groups that these organized groups are created within and honestly assess how do these populations feel and how can governance evolve to better include them into legal society.

Harder and faster and pouring in more money and people to enforce the rule of law is simplistic. We need to find simple. But simple requires deeper understanding and a willingness to honestly assess and accept one's own contribution to the problem one seeks to solve.
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Old 07-24-2013   #7
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Default Headlines =v- reality

Tackling child pornography is often seen as 'organised crime' and this week David Cameron, the UK PM, announced some new steps and this led to a figure being given by a former CEOP head on BBC Radio 4:
Quote:
There are 50,000 predators, we're told by CEOP, downloading images on peer-to-peer, not Google, peer-to-peer. Yet from CEOP intelligence, only 192 were arrested last year.
Link:http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/383215/p...-ex-ceop-chief

Elsewhere an Opposition speaker claimed; citing the same figures with "spin" IMO:
Quote:
Despite identifying 50,000 cases of British residents accessing images of child abuse online last year, Ceop had pursued only about 2,000.
Link:http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-23393851

CEOP is the UK Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre, originally a LE body, it now has extensive commercial and charity funding.
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Old 07-24-2013   #8
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Default The most dangerous words in government: Just Do Something!

Quote:
Originally Posted by davidbfpo View Post
Tackling child pornography is often seen as 'organised crime' and this week David Cameron, the UK PM, announced some new steps and this led to a figure being given by a former CEOP head on BBC Radio 4:

Link:http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/383215/p...-ex-ceop-chief

Elsewhere an Opposition speaker claimed; citing the same figures with "spin" IMO:

Link:http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-23393851

CEOP is the UK Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre, originally a LE body, it now has extensive commercial and charity funding.
I don't think pushing Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo to “do more” is going to help much. The problem is likely on P2P and TOR networks, and facilitated by an global cybercrime infrastructure that is partly state-sanctioned (the lines between organized cybercrime and national cyber war/intel programs get blurry).
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Old 07-24-2013   #9
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Organised crime was the favourite bogeyman used in Germany to undermine privacy protection against the state, long since replaced by terrorists and paedophiles.


The actual treatment of organised crime by the German government(s) looked very different from the rhetoric, at least as far as I can tell:

Some organised crime was suppressed by bilateral police cooperation, notably cooperation with Romanian police against Romanian clans which went on outright looting campaigns in Germanyi in the early/mid 90's, crashing with trucks into jewellery and electronics stores and so on.

On an even larger scale, German law enforcement appears to have become fed up with overly violent foreign organised crime groups (Albanians, Russians, Chinese, occasional Italian Mafia in exile and the like). They cracked down on particularly violent groups, but the really grand design appears to have been to apply asymmetric pressure.
LE pressured the foreign organised crime, but apparently largely tolerated predominantly German 'rocker' gangs (Hell's Angels, Bandidos), which consequently took over market shares.
Organised crime learnt the lesson to stay in the shadows and not attract undue attention with anything spectacular such as blowing up a Mafia racket pizzeria and the like.

The story of the last few years is that some 'rocker' gang chapters got into conflict with each other* or simply too brazen and thus provoked crackdowns by state ministries of the interior and LE, leading to the apparent dissolution of the offending chapters.


So German LE appears to have had a simple grand strategy concerning law enforcement: It's always been, it will always be - but it better behave in public or else.


Just my observations and opinion, of course. The ordinary policeman on patrol may tell you a less (or even more) cynical story if you ask him about it.


*: Including famously blowing buildings up or shooting at each other with Panzerfaust munitions.
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