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Old 01-17-2015   #61
kaur
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This month was established "Antimaidan" movement. Before last Russian presidential elections couple years ago was established "Antiorange" movement. Some of those guys (Dugin, Prohanov, Shevtchenko, Kurginjan) are actively involved in fight against Ukraine today. This site has been inactive almost 3 years now.

http://www.anti-orange.ru

Back then 1 communist blogger explained that Antiorange was Kremlin project. This is not hard to belive. Text is in Russian.

http://ruscesar.livejournal.com/4588...thread=6675275

Last edited by kaur; 01-17-2015 at 09:28 PM.
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Old 01-25-2015   #62
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Yesterday there was Grikin's conference in Moscow. It starts with prayer.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=4_TLWd9qbcI

This is good illustration to Schindler's column.

http://20committee.com/2014/12/27/pu...rthodox-jihad/

Grikin's fresh comment how in Crimea things were forced by Russia.

Quote:
Have you actually been to Crimea during the referendum? Well, I have. I have been there since February the 20th. What you are describing here is absolute rubbish. There were no policemen who supported our side at that time. The only law-enforcement subdivision that has joined our ranks back then was the Berkut. The rest of the law-enforcement agencies remained under control of Ukrainian Ministry of Internal, and kept carrying out the MIA’s orders. Yes, sometimes they were sabotaging these orders, but all in all they were under Ukrainian control. I haven’t seen any support from official governmental representatives in Simferopol. Our troops had to force the deputies into the Oblast Council hall so that these representatives would vote in favor of our initiatives. I know this because I have been at the time commandeering one of such militant teams and I’ve seen it all from the inside. We had absolutely no support from the people, not to mention the army. The Ukrainian army units remained loyal to Kyiv as they were. Furthermore, most of the army remained that way. The only thing that made what we have accomplished in Crimea possible was the presence of Russian army.
(Fragment of video in Russian):

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/3250361/posts

Last edited by davidbfpo; 01-25-2015 at 06:29 PM. Reason: fix quote
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Old 01-25-2015   #63
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That would fit perfectly my impression I gathered from various sources at that time. Obviously Russia enjoyed the sympathy of many, mostly among the eldery and Russian-speakers but without the Russian invasion the illusion of an uprising, not to speak about the annexation of the Crimea, would hardly have been possible in such form.
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Old 02-26-2015   #64
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Interesting document from House of Lords
http://www.publications.parliament.u.../115/11502.htm

European Union Committee - Sixth Report
The EU and Russia: before and beyond the crisis in Ukraine



Quote:
MEMBER STATES: LOSS OF ANALYTICAL CAPACITY

56. Witnesses told us that Member States had lost analytical capacity on Russia. This, we judge, contributed to a concomitant decline in their ability to maintain oversight of the direction of the EU-Russia relationship and, in particular, to monitor the political implications of the Commission's trade and technical programmes.

57. Mr Klaus recalled that there had been a historic asymmetry, whereby former communist countries "knew the West much more than you knew the East", and that this asymmetry remained.[74] His Excellency Dr Revaz Gachechiladze, Georgian Ambassador to the UK, also noted that there was "not a good understanding of Russia in the West".[75] Turning to recent events, Mr Lukyanov recalled that on the day of the Crimean referendum, when the question had already been announced, he continued to receive disbelieving calls from European diplomats saying: "'It cannot happen. It is just a bluff'." He warned us that with "this level of analysis, I am afraid that more surprises are to come, and not only from Russia."[76] Dr Casier agreed that there was a "huge need for more knowledge about the local situation both in Russia and in the Eastern Partnership countries." This was where "we have to build much stronger analytical capacity."[77] Dr Casier pointed out that President Yanukovych's decision not to sign the Association Agreement (AA) "had been the subject of speculation in the Ukrainian press long before he announced his decision, but took the EU by total surprise."[78]

58. Mr Josef Janning, Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, noted that while there remained experienced diplomats in national capitals, there had been a shrinking of the "strategic space" within ministries of foreign affairs, in which to "go through the options and do analysis".[79]

59. The Rt Hon David Lidington MP agreed that there was a gap in knowledge and analysis, and judged this to be a function of time and of "various assumptions" made about Russia during the Gorbachev and Yeltsin years. These meant that, by the beginning of 2014, "there were very few officials in any government department or agency, here or elsewhere, who had personal professional experience of working with the old Soviet Union before it collapsed."[80] During our informal discussions we were told that a similar situation prevailed in other Member States as well.
Gawd, does European political class really works like that? "It can't be true because I don't believe it!"
Your ruling classes urgently need Eliezer Yudkovsky as a political specialist, because he really nows how reality works: "There is only one reality that generates all of the observations".
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Old 04-01-2015   #65
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Interesting reading.

What does the fascist conference in St. Petersburg tell us about contemporary Russia?

http://anton-shekhovtsov.blogspot.be...nce-in-st.html
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Old 04-01-2015   #66
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Kaur,

This conference appeared briefly within the main Ukraine thread and a week ago I posted this:

If the St. Petersburg conference relies on Nick Griffin they have a problem, at least here in the UK - although I doubt the main media will report it.

Nick Griffin was the leader of the British National Party (BNP) from 1999 to October 2014, when he was expelled and left to form an even smaller fringe group. To many he was a figure of derision:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nick_Griffin

Clearly no-one in the Russia government understands irony!

Apart from the very small fringe of democratic politics in Western Europe these people IMHO have no impact, although in places they can make conservative / nationalist parties wander what is going on behind them.

Whether they have any impact in Russia is a moot point. I expect those Russians who did attend like listening to like-minded folk.
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Old 04-02-2015   #67
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David, thanks for Griffin backround. My humble opinion is that these European nationalists (I mean those who gathered in Petersburg) are just useful idiots for Kremlin. You can bring them to TV shows, take interviews, bring to different elections campaigns (Crimea, Donbas, Abkhazia, Transnistria etc). Russian people are watching all this and think even Europeans support them. Just one tool in their box. Who are they fooling? I think just their own people. At one moment I thought those European nationalists are like peace movement in 80s. If you consider FN support to Kremlin Russians are doing better this time and this is more serious achivement than St Petersburg episode.

http://www.foia.cia.gov/sites/defaul...7/19830201.pdf

One aspect from Saint Petersburg. Usually the most important person in the room will make the last speech. According to program this man was from RISI.

http://realpatriot.ru/reports/

Couple month ago the backround of RISI was made open.

As Kseniya Kirillova documents on Novy Region 2, the head of the Russian Institute for Strategic Studies (RISI), earlier part of Russia’s Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR) and now in the Presidential Administration, admits his institution “over the course of the year has actively cooperated with analysts of the Greek SYRIZA Party” and that its leader, the new Greek prime minister, visited RISI.

That admission came in the course of a press release from RISI director Leonid Reshetnikov, a retired lieutenant general, concerning statements by Aleksandr Sytin, his former staffer, about RISI’s involvement in planning the Russian Anschluss of Crimea and the war in the Donbass and its current appeals for forming “pro-Russian” groups in Belarus on the basis of ties with the security agencies in that country.

http://www.interpretermag.com/kremli...greek-premier/

Last edited by kaur; 04-02-2015 at 09:22 AM.
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Old 04-03-2015   #68
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Fresh survey (close to Kremlin polling firm ФОМ) shows 54% of Russians belive in danger of large scale war between Russia and NATO countries. 2/3 of Russians belive that Russia peace loving politics works hard to diminish this risk. Article in Russian.

http://www.kommersant.ru/doc/2700003

Continued Confrontation With the West Will Prop up Putin’s Regime for Years

April 2, 2015
By: Pavel Felgenhauer

http://www.jamestown.org/programs/ed...b#.VR5_ChhXerV

Levada's poll shows how Russians perceive Russia's role in the world.

http://www.levada.ru/eng/russia’s-role-world

Last edited by kaur; 04-03-2015 at 12:00 PM.
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Old 04-04-2015   #69
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RF MFA statement.

Quote:
Comment by the Information and Press Department on an anti-Russian campaign in the United States


628-03-04-2015

We are witnessing with dismay and indignation an unrestrained anti-Russian campaign, which is unfolding in the United States. The US national media and leading political research centres splash, as if at a command, russophobic pasquinades, diligently portraying Russia as an enemy and instilling hatred towards all things Russian in ordinary people.
Veteran “knights of the Cold War”, like Robert Scales, a retired general, who in March openly called for “killing Russians”, or Wesley Clark, the former top commander of NATO forces in Europe, are straining at the leash. Back in 1999, Mr Clark all but provoked a large-scale conflict when he ordered an attack on Russian airborne assault troops who arrived at the Pristina airport in Kosovo before the Americans. Addressing the Atlantic Council in Washington a couple of days ago, he again blew the whistle about the so-called “Russian threat”, demanding immediate supplies of weapons to Kiev to be used against Donbass and openly lauding Bandera supporters.
It should be said, however, that statements made by those odious characters are only slightly more offensive than what we hear from US officials. Echoing the retired US-NATO general’s odes to Hitler’s collaborators, US Deputy Secretary of State Antony Blinken said that attempts to defend the right to speak Russian were “Russia’s linguistic nationalism”. To put it differently, Russians and Russian-speakers in other countries, including in Ukraine, are to blame just because they speak Russian and think in Russian.
In a word, those are propanganda-spewing loudspeakers working hard on Washington’s political assignment.

April 3, 2015
http://mid.ru/bdomp/brp_4.nsf/e78a48...6!OpenDocument
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Old 04-04-2015   #70
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http://windowoneurasia2.blogspot.de/....html?spref=tw

A must read article that provides an unusual view into Putin ie Russian end state goals in the Ukraine, the "altered state of reality" they reside in and to a degree a certain amount of paranoia:

Saturday, April 4, 2015

Quote:
Novorossiya Will Never Be Part of Ukraine Again, Kremlin Advisor Says
Paul Goble

Staunton, April 4 – Leonid Reshetnikov, a retired SVR general, director of the Russian Institute for Strategic Studies (RISI), and an advisor to Vladimir Putin, says that there is no possibility that Novorossiya will be part of Ukraine ever again because “the people of the south-east do not want to be Ukrainians.”

He also rules out the likelihood that the territories of the Donetsk Peoples Republic and Luhansk Peoples Republic, with their “millions of people,” could become something like a Transdniestria, a partially recognized country within the borders of another country recognized by most.

And thus he suggests that the immediate future is more war and the longer term future is the annexation of these areas and ultimately the rest of Ukraine and much of the former Soviet space into a new Russian state that will combine “the best features” of the pre-1917 Russian Empire and the USSR.

These are just some of the views that Reshetnikov offers in the course of a wide-ranging interview he gave to Aleksandr Chuikov, a journalist for “Argumenty Nedeli” (rgumenti.ru/toptheme/n481/394395).

Reshetnikov says that his institute which began as a secret part of the SVR has long specialized on “the analysis of available information on the far and near abroad,” information “which is needed not only for intelligence but for the structures which define the foreign policy of the country.”

“However strange it may seem,” until very recently, “there were no such serious analytic centers in the Presidential Administration of Russia,” the former SVR general says. Instead, what the Kremlin had too many of were “’institutions’” which consisted of “a director, a secretary, and the wife of the director” but without the staff that could make them effective.

RISI is different, he continues. It was created by Vladimir Putin, “and all government assignments for its investigations are signed off by Sergey Ivanov, the head of the Presidential Administration.”

When RISI was set up as a separate institution in 2009, Reshetnikov says he thought then that if Moscow would finance it the way Stratfor or RAND are financed, he would be in a position to leave Western analytic centers in the dust because “Russian analysts are the very strongest in the world.”

“I can say this with confidence,” he adds, “on the basis of 33 years of analytic work initially in the First Chief Directorate of the KGB of the USSR and then in the SVR.”

Reshetnikov says that his institute was one of two that has been working most intensively on Ukraine. (The other is the Institute of CIS Countries.) “From the very beginning of our activity, we wrote analytic reports about the growth of anti-Russian attitudes in central Ukraine and the intensification of pro-Russian ones in Crimea.”

He says that RISI was not alarmist about this but rather urged that Moscow take steps to use NGOs in both places to promote pro-Moscow feelings, something the Russian embassy in Kyiv did not do as much as it should have and as Russian embassies are now doing thanks to the intervention of President Putin.

The probability that there will be more war in Ukraine in the coming months is “very high,” Reshetnikov says, because the idea of the federalization of Ukraine has been rejected by Kyiv which is operating under pressure from the United States which wants a united Ukraine so that it can put cruise missiles there to be directed at Russia.

That is so important to Washington, the RISI director says, that “the US will fight for the Donbas down to the last Ukrainian.”

When Yanukovich was ousted by the Maidan, Moscow lost its “SOB” in Ukraine, even as the US installed its “SOB,” he says. But both Russia and the US received “compensation.” Russia got Crimea and the resistance of Ukraine’s south-east, even though “the enemy also received an enormous territory which was part of the Soviet Union and the Russian Empire.”

At the same time, Reshetnikov says that it is “too early” for Moscow to go for broke and attempt to seize all of Ukraine. That is because Putin understands that “in Europe there are taking place certain processes which are hidden for outsiders,” processes which “give hope that we will be able to defend our interests by other methods and means.”

Putin understands as many do not, Reshetnikov says, that the US has organized a plan to dismember Russia – something he says is “not propagandistic but real” -- even as it keeps its dominance over Europe. Washington is acting in Central Asia as well as Ukraine. Indeed, the US may strike first at Turkmenistan using various proxies, as some in Moscow have suggested.

According to Reshetnikov, Russian-American cooperation in the struggle with terrorism is “a fiction,” because the US “creates, feeds, provides for and then gives orders” to groups like ISIS for its own purposes. “Perhaps,” it will shoot attack one group of terrorists but only to be in a position to better control the others.

But all these American actions, the RISI director says, are part of a general plan and thus they must be countered as a whole rather than responded to piecemeal. That affects how Putin acts in Ukraine, even if many do not recognize the reasons that he does one thing or another, Reshetnikov adds.

According to the RISI director, what is occurring in Ukraine is not a fight between Ukrainians and Russians, “but a war of world systems. Some consider they are ‘all Europe’ but others that they are Russia. For our country is not simply a territory; it is a separate and enormous civilization which has brought to the attention of the entire world its views on world organization.”

The next year is going to be difficult for Russia, he continues, but “in the course of the next five or six years, we will see” the restoration of “a Russian empire as a model of eastern Slavic civilization. The Bolsheviks destroyed it,” but they brought “a new civilization idea.” Now, Reshetnikov says, Russia is moving toward “a good symbiosis” of its two predecessors.

The West understands that and consequently, “an attack has begun” on Russia “from all sides,” he says. That attack is being made by American presidents, but the real power lies with “secret forces,” including “transnational financial corporations” which want to define the new rules of the game.

But both the attractiveness of what Russia is offering and the ugliness of what the West is doing is leading to “an explosive growth of anti-American attitudes,” in Hungary, Greece, Italy, Austria, France and so on. “If Russia holds out now,” he says, “then processes will occur in Europe that will not be helpful to those now seeking world domination.”

At the end of his interview, Reshetnikov says that he is “extremely” opposed to the idea of uniting the SVR and the KGB. Were that to happen, he argues, the number of sources of information available to the president would be reduce to one, and thus he would be subject to distortions that that one would almost inevitably introduce.

He says that when he was a captain in the KGB in Soviet times, he was aware of “such manipulations with information” by his employer.

Chuikov appends a biographical sketch of Reshetnikov. The RISI director was born in Potsdam in East Germany in 1947. He graduated from the Kharkiv State University and did graduate work at the University of Sofia in Bulgaria. From 1974 to 1976, he worked at the Moscow Institute of the Economics of the World Socialist System.

NOTE: Putin as a KGB Major assigned to the KGB headquarters in Potsdam. Was the RISI a child of a Russian KGB member assigned to :Potsdam after the end of WW2?

Then, from 1976 to 2009, when he became RISI director, Reshetnikov served in the analytic sections of Soviet and then Russian foreign intelligence. His last post was as chief of the SVR’s Information and Analysis Administration. In addition to his native Russian, he speaks Serbian and Bulgarian and can communicate in Greek.

Last edited by davidbfpo; 04-04-2015 at 09:09 PM. Reason: quotes
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Old 05-09-2015   #71
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May parade in Grozny - escort of German prisoners, throwing trophies to Kadyrov, attack of Reichstag

http://lifenews.ru/news/153687

Yesterday Kadyrov gave 16 motorcycles to Nighwolves bikers club visiting Berlin today.
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Old 06-10-2015   #72
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I just put it here. This icon really exists:
https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C8%EA...E0%EB%E8%ED%BB
Miraclous Order of Lenin will follow, I am sure.
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Old 06-10-2015   #73
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http://euromaidanpress.com/2015/06/1...garding-ukrain...

Russian newspaper: Regarding Ukraine, Putin’s actions undercut Putin’s arguments

2015/06/10

Quote:
Russian actions in Crimea and the Donbas “have weakened Russian arguments about the change of power in Kyiv” at the time of the Maidan and thus cost Moscow support in European and other Western capitals, according to a lead article in “Nezavisimaya gazeta” today.

In his interview with “Corriere della Sera,” Vladimir Putin repeated his longstanding views about the Maidan and the subsequent change of power in Ukraine, arguing that the change in power in Kyiv was unconstitutional and that the West should not be supporting those who came to power as a result.

Moreover, in the same interview, Putin suggested that the reason the Maidan happened was because then incumbent president Viktor Yanukovich did not immediately sign an agreement with the European Union. “But the new authorities also put off its signing. So why should the former have been overthrown if they behaved reasonably?” in Putin’s view.

Many would dispute Putin’s version of events and suggest that Yanukovich “delegitimized himself” as a result of a whole range of actions. But Putin’s argument “is not without an internal logic” and might have been accepted by Europe as significant “if it were not for two ‘buts’ – Crimea and the Donbas.”

Most of the European political establishment and society, the Moscow paper’s editors say, “consider that Russia seized and continues to occupy the territory of a sovereign state,” something that for them is “completely unacceptable.” And consequently, they are not interested in what Putin has to say about the Maidan, especially when they are convinced that Kyiv’s effort to join the West and “defend itself from an aggressive neighbor” is completely reasonable.

“Putin cannot present the annexation of Crimea in a way that the Europeans will consider it as well-based,” the paper says. The Kosovo argument “doesn’t work,” given that Milosevich was in the eyes of the Europeans carrying out a genocide against the Albanians, something for which there was no analogy in Ukraine.

Nor does his argument that Crimea became part of Russia as the result of an expression of the popular will, the editors continue. Europeans believe that for such a referendum to be valid, it has to be procedurally correct, correspond to Constitutional norms, and involve more time for free debate about its outcome.

Consequently, “if Russia criticizes the change in power in Kyiv as procedural arbitrariness, then does this mean that [the world] must welcome such arbitrary actions in Crimea? How do new mistakes with far-reaching consequences assist in the correction of previous mistakes?”

At the same time, the paper points out, “few in Europe believe that Russia is not providing active support to the militants in the Donbas, not supplying them with arms, not consulting with them, and not sending into the region its own soldiers.” Given that, few Europeans are willing to listen to Putin’s argument about anything else.

And that includes Putin’s arguments about Eurasian integration. He insists it is like European integration and thus is upset that Europeans do not support it. After all, why should they have anything against Moscow when Russia is only doing what they are? But for Europeans, Putin’s analogy in this regard is not convincing either.

“The European Union is an historically unprecedented project,” the Moscow paper says. “Bt the integration processes which have Moscow as their center recall to Western Europe the Soviet Union, which for decades was conceived as an opponent. Any movement toward the reintegration of the post-Soviet space generates among Europeans distrust and fear.”

Moreover, the paper continues, “Russia is not doing anything to dispel this fear. On the contrary, to take pride in the Soviet past and ‘the times when they feared us’ is considered correct in the Russian Federation.”

European integration is “super-national” and based on “blurring” the borders of member states, “Nezavisimaya gazeta” says. “If Russia asserts that its project is analogous, then why does its ruling elite talk so often about some kind of Russian world? And why has it annexed Crimea if integration processes are objective and Ukraine has nowhere to escape from them?”
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Old 06-18-2015   #74
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Another icon with Stalin. Prohhanov was visiting strategic bomber unit with it.

http://pln-pskov.ru/society/207487.html

Prohhanov is close to Rodina party. Rodina guys are Glazev, who is responsible for Eurasian project in Administration and Rogozin, who is deputy PM responsible for military industrial complex. Prohhanov's colleague from Den TV Borodai was DNR PM last summer and during first peace talks with Ukraine.
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Old 06-19-2015   #75
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Here is Prohhanov's icon's pic.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Stalin.jpg (51.7 KB, 19 views)
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Old 11-10-2015   #76
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Back to the spins of 19th century.

Quote:
Russophobia in the Kremlin’s strategy. A weapon of mass destruction

2015-11-02

Jolanta DarczewskaPiotr Żochowski

Building up an image of Russophobic countries is currently instrumental in shaping a neo-imperial political identity among the citizens of the Russian Federation, mobilising them in the face of real or alleged threats, and also serves as a form of restoring psychological comfort to them in the face of the failure of the Kremlin’s actions (as in Ukraine, for example). The mythologised stereotype of Russophobic countries also remains a crowning argument and a simple explanation for the ongoing tensions in relations between Russia and the West.
http://www.osw.waw.pl/en/publikacje/...ss-destruction
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Old 11-10-2015   #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kaur View Post
Back to the spins of 19th century.
Blaming Russo/Sovietophobic countries for anything was never out of stile in Russia, actually, except short phase of romantic relations with West in early90-s.
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Old 11-20-2015   #78
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Default Russian adventurism under Putin: Lessons from Ukraine and Syria

A podcast (55mins) by a retired US diplomat Ambassador Jack Matlock and his service:
Quote:
During his 35 years in the American Foreign Service (1956-1991), Jack Matlock served as Ambassador to the Soviet Union from 1987 to 1991, Special Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs and Senior Director for European and Soviet Affairs on the National Security Council Staff from 1983 until 1986, and Ambassador to Czechoslovakia from 1981 to 1983. Before his appointment to Moscow as Ambassador, Mr. Matlock served three tours at the American Embassy in the Soviet Union between 1961 and 1981. His other Foreign Service assignments were in Vienna, Munich, Accra, Zanzibar and Dar es Salaam, in addition to tours in Washington as Director of Soviet Affairs in the State Department (1971-74) and as Deputy Director of the Foreign Service Institute (1979-80).
Link:http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/...k-matlock.aspx
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Old 03-30-2016   #79
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Default A Look at Russian Civilization: Power, Truth, Trust, and War

A Look at Russian Civilization: Power, Truth, Trust, and War

Entry Excerpt:



--------
Read the full post and make any comments at the SWJ Blog.
This forum is a feed only and is closed to user comments.
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Old 04-01-2017   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SWJ Blog View Post
This article contents some factual bull$hit, usually called lie, for example:

Quote:
A heart-breaking present day example of this is the appearance of anti-theft devices in Russian supermarkets on mundane wares like cheese and sausage.
and its general tone sounds like mundane dehumanisation of Other, with lengthy qutations of some crackpots like Dugin, and know-nothings like Akunin while thorouthly ignoring good science like http://www.worldvaluessurvey.org/wvs.jsp, for example.
but some points are a true, as it should be with good propaganda.
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