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Old 08-09-2010   #1
AdamG
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Default Greece (catch all)

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Struggling under massive debt and squeezed by sweeping spending cuts, Greeks are relying on the tourist trade to help give its economy a much-needed bump. So the last thing they need right now is a terrorist group threatening to turn Greece into a "war zone." But when the Sect of Revolutionaries recently warned that "tourists should learn that Greece is no longer a safe haven of capitalism," keeping the country crippled was clearly one of their goals.

In a CD containing a proclamation sent to the center-left newspaper Ta Nea on July 27, the group promised "arson, sabotage, violent demonstrations, bombings and assassinations."
http://news.yahoo.com/s/time/2010080...9pc3RoZW5ld2c-
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Old 08-09-2010   #2
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Default Big Jim Van Fleet

This is Old Hat for Greece because Communists causing trouble there has been going on ever since 1945.

It may be too long ago for folks to remember it now, but in 1947 when the British pulled out of the civil war in Greece between the the Royalists and the Communists the U.S. Army moved in with a military advisory command and helped them fight against the Reds. The trouble in Greece was what caused President Truman to announce the "Truman Doctrine," the American policy of assisting governments that were fighting internal Communist subversion. For a period the commander there was Gen. James Van Fleet, who also served in WW II and Korea. There is a fictionalized account of the civil war in Greece in the W.E.B. Griffin novel The Lieutenants.

I could be mistaken but Ken White probably remembers when this happened.
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Old 08-09-2010   #3
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Default Quick comment

Adam G,

Greece has a long standing problem with extremist groups, as the November 17th group showed and I suspect the causes are more than poor governance and incompetent security agencies - hopefully the later is history. On a quick read no-one is able to estimate the size of the group(s), their intent is partly in the open - with statements published and what is their real capability? Yet again proof that a small minority can have such an impact.

BBC 2009 comment:http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7872214.stm

Wiki:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terrorism_in_Greece

The recent crisis in Greece could, dangerously IMHO, give a spurious legitimacy to such protests and a "blind eye" by some to their activities. Have a look at Stefan Aust's book on the Baader-Meinhof gang (Post 691 on What are you reading thread) and 'Europe's Last Red Terrorists and The Revolutionary Organisation "November 17" By George Kassimeris.
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Old 08-09-2010   #4
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Dave,
Thanks for directing the answer to me by name, but I merely posted the interrogative as written in the headline.

We've all read about the post-WWII fun-fest in Greece, I'm sure, but I found this passage to be the foot-stomper in the article:

Quote:
"This is the first time we have ever had a terror organization in Greece saying they plan to target innocent bystanders and even tourists," says Mary Bossis, a security expert and professor at the University of Piraeus. "It's a change in mentality that's very troubling."
nb : a year ago, they were refered to as the 'Sect of Rebels'.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/22/wo.../22greece.html
Must have gotten a new drummer.
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Old 08-09-2010   #5
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Dean Acheson's book Present at the Creation is worth reading for background on the early days of the Cold War. As Secretary of State under Truman he was the main architect of the Containment policy.
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Old 11-02-2011   #6
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Default Greek military leadership changes spark opposition outcry

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As Greek politics grew ever more chaotic strong political protests erupted as the government moved to replace military chiefs with officers seen as more supportive of George Papandreou, the prime minister.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/f...on-outcry.html
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Old 11-03-2011   #7
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(Reuters) - Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou defied demands on Thursday that he resign over his decision to hold a referendum on the nation's euro zone bailout deal, calling instead for his party to unite for a confidence vote in the government.
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/...2F+Top+News%29

Quote:
(Reuters) - The Greek government's sacking of its military brass at the height of the debt crisis may signal that the cabinet sees its own days as numbered, but the outside world need not worry about the army installing a junta as it did four decades ago.

Greeks have largely shrugged off suggestions that appeared in foreign media that the firing on Tuesday of top generals might have been aimed at thwarting a coup. The military is nowhere near the formidable political force that seized power in 1967 and held it for seven years.
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/...7A17BZ20111102
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Old 11-04-2011   #8
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Not much good can come of this. I thought the European countries were beyond this sort of nonsense.
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Old 11-04-2011   #9
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Default Nonsense?

Jon,

The WW2 motto 'Keep Calm and Carry On' appears to fit the situation in Greece, as regards this story and this sentence from the original story posted helps and with my emphasis:
Quote:
the sudden, sweeping changes, which were scheduled to be considered on November 7 as part of a regular annual review of military leadership retirements and promotions. Usually the annual changes do not affect the entire leadership.
There are different ways of interpreting these moves, notably that Greece is in a bad predicament and if emergency civilian rule is required a new set of fresh, younger military leaders could be a wise move.

Looking back at recent history, when Greece had military rulers so did for far longer Portugal and Spain. Europe I hope has moved a long way from that.

From my limited viewing of events in Greece the violence is very limited, with the focal point being the national parliament and this week I've seen footage of the Greek PM arriving at the parliament in an unescorted car (unlike David Cameron in the UK, even when driving the half mile or less to parliament).
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Old 11-04-2011   #10
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Default

I suppose I should clarify that I see the sweeping replacement of all the heads of the service branches as an unwise move. Admittedly, I am neither Greek nor in Greece at the moment.

I'm mostly stumped that a sitting government would even have "some of their own" to be able to install when they are on the cusp of leaving. Then again, I've never even paid attention enough to American politics in terms of heads of service branches and the JCS, and their tours of duty, to ascertain if they are shifted around in a cycle similar to what is going on in Greece.

Still seems odd to change military leadership like that. Doing it during trying times like this seems bizarre.

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Old 12-05-2013   #11
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Default 17N: a terror group without arrests for 27years

The Greek terrorist group 17N or 'Revolutionary Organization 17 November' was remarkable for eluding detection for so long, twenty seven years from foundation in 1975 and the first, critical arrests in 2002. Wikipedia shows:
Quote:
The group assassinated 23 people[3] in 103 attacks on U.S., British, Turkish and Greek targets.
Link:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revolut...on_17_November

A new, exceptionally well reviewed book has been published 'Inside Greek Terrorism' by George Kassimeris, this comment is by Bruce Hoffman:
Quote:
This is both an important and a timely work, especially given the recent re-emergence of extremist violence in Greece. Kassimeris is without any doubt the leading analyst today on Greek violent extremism and one of the leading younger scholars in the field of terrorism and political violence.
From the publisher's website:
Quote:
The long story of Greek terrorism was meant to have ended in the summer of 2002 with the collapse of the country’s premier terrorist organisation and one of Europe’s longest-running gangs, the notorious 17 November group (17N). However, rather than demoralising and emasculating the country’s armed struggle movement, the dismantling of 17N and the imprisonment of its members led to the emergence of new urban guerrilla groups and an upsurge in and intensification of revolutionary violence.

Given the sheer longevity of the 17N terrorist experience, George Kassimeris sets out to analyse the life histories of the group’s imprisoned members. Their stories, told through their own words, offer us a clearer picture than we have ever had of the political and ideological environment that provided the foundations upon which revolutionary terrorism took root in the mid-1970s. This book also brings up to date the gritty story of Greek terrorism by analysing the country’s post-17N generation of urban guerrilla groups, placing their extremism and violence in a broader political and cultural perspective.
There is a small thread on Greece, which refers to them in part and has other references:http://council.smallwarsjournal.com/...ad.php?t=11125

Link to publisher's website:http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=...8&e=80d42c7c0a
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Old 03-08-2014   #12
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Default Update

I finally got to read this book whilst commuting this week.

It is a slim book, 176 pgs and is easy to read. 17N is not the only group examined, indeed Greece has had a plethora of small terrorist groups; one killed two and then was never active again. The group is mentioned in the footnotes at the rear of the book - a reminder to me to check them as reading, not at the end.

How the Greek state failed to counter terrorism is not included - which is a weakness. The state certainly contributed to the radicalisation of tiny groups. Several times the police's propensity to accidentally fire shots during protests added "petrol to the fire" and I do not overlook the murder of police officers and others.

Well worth reading, especially how a small group can escape detection and fail to be successful - except to themselves.
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Old 03-24-2014   #13
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Default New Dawn is not about to bloom this Spring?

Greece has a long history of what many regard as extremist political activity and in recent years a new political party, New Dawn, has emerged on the right, gaining electoral support - with MPs elected - and street-level activity.

Now it appears under judicial direction New Dawn is being investigated and maybe banned:http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...eece-neo-nazis

Quote:
Last week one Golden Dawn MP resigned, citing ignorance of the party's activities. Another was expelled after indicating that he, too, was about to leave.....The loss of its deputies reduces to 16 the number of seats the neo-Nazis control in the 300-member house – although nine MPs already face charges and six have been jailed pending trial. In February (the judicial figures) Klapa and Dimitropoulou proposed that politicians lift the immunity of another nine MPs who have so far escaped prosecution. A parliamentary vote is expected in the coming weeks.
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Old 04-03-2015   #14
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Default Alexis Tsipras looks to Moscow but risks becoming Putinís useful idiot

An article in The Guardian, the author is unknown to me and her mini bio says:
Quote:
She was previously executive editor and managing editor of Le Monde.
This article could sit in the more active thread on Russian flirting if not subversive activities with the extreme right and nationalists in democratic Europe. See Posts 64 onwards:http://council.smallwarsjournal.com/...t=20681&page=4

Since it is about Greece it is here:http://www.theguardian.com/commentis...-useful-idiot?
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