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Thread: All about Camouflage & BCU (inc cartoons)

  1. #121
    Council Member Fuchs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMA View Post
    At a personal level? Not sure about that... You can substantiate that statement?
    Different printing technology.

    Emission of infrared radiation (energy) due to firing rather than due to body heat.

    Munitions (such as rifle grenades, hand grenades, LAW) may be hidden behind textiles most of the time, only exposed during use.

    Camouflage (such as netting) must not obstruct interface or operation of rifle (no problem with arms, for example).

    Firing signatures are more important than weapon/munition visuals themselves.

  2. #122
    Council Member Fuchs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMA View Post
    At a personal level? Not sure about that... You can substantiate that statement?
    Different printing technology.

    Emission of infrared radiation (energy) due to firing rather than due to body heat.

    Munitions (such as rifle grenades, hand grenades, LAW) may be hidden behind textiles most of the time, only exposed during use.

    Camouflage (such as netting) must not obstruct interface or operation of rifle (no problem with arms, for example).

    Firing signatures are more important than weapon/munition visuals themselves.

  3. #123
    Council Member Firn's Avatar
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    Just some minor observations on animal 'camouflage', for example tiger stripes and leopard spots, and why they should be use with carefully as a specific example.*

    A great shot of a leopard which gets widely published is usually one in relative bright, low-angle light of the animal out in the open not actively stalking or hunting seen by us humans through a camera lens. It is bit like a soldier standing to attention during a ceremony on the parade ground as seen by a (enemy?) crow overlooking the scene.

    1) For a leopard's prey, a deer, orange or reddish tones don't stand out of green and brown ones of similar brightness.

    2) The colour spectrum of the predator, prey and habitat during it's prime hunting periods over the 24 h cycle is is different from the one observed during day time. Leopars tend to spent most of the day hidden and resting, investing their energy ressources when their chances are relatively high. Too much activity also tends to spook the jungle.

    3) Cats see better at night then primates while their sight is more accute then deer prey. Truth be told I don't know how much light they gather relative to deer, but in general a stalk is easier in during a time full of long shadows, low light and coarse vision resolution.

    4) Their coloration, patter and counter-shadowing works in conjunction with 1-3 plus the their often amazing fieldcraft in stalking, using terrain, vegation and shadows.

    There is obviously not only the prey-predator relationship but also the role of competitors (bears, some birds), potential predators (tigers) and other jungle folk. For example some birds and monkeys are know to be keen spotters (generally in good light conditions) of the cats and sound loud warnings.

    *There are of course many valid tendencies to be gained by close study.

    It is overall a vast and rich topic with deep ties to other threads like animal vision and many others. So much to learn and understand and so little time. A nice primer on animal eyes by a lecture of Gresham university. New insights in Deer vision is of particular interest for hunters and other predators, showing also the evolutionary response of the prey's eye sight. You learn a great deal IMHO from different sources like Corbett books and Peterson Reference Guide to the Behavior of North American Mammals and from your personal experience out in the woods, up the mountains facing some animal stare.
    Last edited by Firn; 05-30-2014 at 06:32 PM.
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  4. #124
    Council Member ganulv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firn View Post
    2) The colour spectrum of the predator, prey and habitat during it's prime hunting periods over the 24 h cycle is is different from the one observed during day time.

    3) Cats see better at night then primates while their sight is more accute then deer prey. Truth be told I don't know how much light they gather relative to deer, but in general a stalk is easier in during a time full of long shadows, low light and coarse vision resolution.
    This is related to the fact that they are dichromats, yes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Firn View Post
    For example some birds and monkeys are know to be keen spotters (generally in good light conditions) of the cats and sound loud warnings.
    By the same token, this is related to the fact that primates are trichromats, right? And I believe that it has been suggested that some birds possess superior color vision to humans.
    If you dont read the newspaper, you are uninformed; if you do read the newspaper, you are misinformed. Mark Twain (attributed)

  5. #125
    Council Member Firn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ganulv View Post
    This is related to the fact that they are dichromats, yes?



    By the same token, this is related to the fact that primates are trichromats, right? And I believe that it has been suggested that some birds possess superior color vision to humans.
    To a good degree. Keep in mind that a leopard moving silently through a ravine with thick vegatation can get hugely annoyed by birds and primates telegraphing their current location sitting on rocks and trees. In that case the reddish, orange, yellowish tones work against him. This aspect of his coat is a classic trade-off. Roe deer, red fox and red deer have also clearly not evolved their specific coloration in response to those pesky two-legged primates*. Their habbits a great deal, especially more experienced ladies tend to become nocturnal ghosts when human hunting pressure is high. They tend to chose their rest areas very well.

    Countershading tends to be much more universal with little trade-off, from what I know. Just browse through your mental images of varios animals in their habitat during the times of activity and go through some field guides.

    As said before the whole topic is so rich especially if you combine it with personal activities like birding, tracking and hunting.

    *Obviously even their sommer coat is not just red. It also looks very different in shades of grey when they are most active and still open to shoot.
    Last edited by Firn; 05-30-2014 at 06:52 PM.
    ... "We need officers capable of following systematically the path of logical argument to its conclusion, with disciplined intellect, strong in character and nerve to execute what the intellect dictates"

    General Ludwig Beck (1880-1944);
    Speech at the Kriegsakademie, 1935

  6. #126
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    http://lbxtactical.com/collections/b...ge-combat-pant

    good price... however, I go with issued stuff. Not because its so good, but because I would feel like airsofter if buying even the uniform. Hopefully our failing logistics will not force me to deploy in PT sweatpants...
    Last edited by BushrangerCZ; 06-06-2014 at 08:24 PM.

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